(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Leyendas con canciones : legends retold"

Boston Public Library 
Boston, MA 02116 



LEYENDAS GQN EANGIQNES 



Told in Spanish and English 



Legends retold 
Music and Lyrics 
by 

Patti Lozano 
Illustrations 



by 





Dolo Publications, Inc. 

Language through Music 



Acknowledgement 



Several individuals have been very instrumental in the creation of this book, 
and I want to express my heartfelt appreciation to them. 

Thank you to my husband, Alberto, and my friend, Christina Nell, for editing 
and correcting the Spanish many times over. Thank you to Brenda Lozano for 
reviewing the Spanish stories one final time, to Millie Smaardyk for editing the 
English version and to Rose Al-Banna for designing the glossaries. 

I also want to thank Carmen Plott for her beautifijl illustrations which bring 
each legend vibrantly to life. Thank you to Bob Vestewig and Leo O 'Neil for 
sharing their superb musicianship to help create the musical arrangements for my 
songs, as well as to Cindy Miller for her lovely flute accompaniment. 

I must thank my sons, Ariel, Johnny and Jesse, who were eager to hear each 
story, although somewhat less enthusiastic to share me with the computer for 
countless hours. 

Finally, I want to thank my mother, Renate Donovan, who, in addition to 
laboring over the glossaries, has lived and breathed each page of this book with me 
since its beginning. It's been flin! 



Copyright ©Patti Lozano 1997 
All Rights Reserved 
First Printing 1997 
Printed in the United States of America 

ISBN 0-9650980-2-8 

This publication is protected by Copyright and permission should be obtained from the 
publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or 
transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, 
recording or otherwise. 

Dolo Publications, Ina 
12800 Briar Forest Drive #23 
Houston, Texas 77077-2201 
(281) 4934552 or (281) 463-6694 
fax: (281) 679-9092 
e-mail doloiS'wt.net 




Storytelling and music... 

Legends and folksongs.. 



The two genres are inseparable in the history of oral literature. The common 
people have always recorded their cultural identities, their historical milestones and the 
nuances and eccentricities of their daily lives in tales and songs. Teachers have long 
used both of these literary forms in their classrooms, in countless creative ways, in both 
first and second language instruction. Leyendas con canciones is unique in that it not 
only contains a collection of delightfijl legends, but also includes an original song 
composed to accompany and enhance each one of them. 

About the legends... 

The legends have been gathered from all comers of the Spanish speaking 
world, including the United States, Mexico, Central America, South America and 
Spain. Some stories are lighthearted, such as 'T/o Tigre y Tío Conejo''' some are 
poignant and powerfijl, such as "El Sombrerón," some reflect the depth of human 
emotions, such as "Los Arboles de las Flores Blancas,^' and some attempt to 
explain the origin of plants or animals, such as "La familia Real. " 

All the tales are written in a congenial folk style, designed for readers who 
are beginning to feel at ease with the target language. They are presented first in 
Spanish, and later, in English. Although the stories in both languages are the same 
in plot and description, the sentences are not translated word for word. Each story 
is told in a smoothly flowing vibrant style suitable for that particular language. 

Leyendas con canciones will appeal to different types of readers: students 
of Spanish, students of English, devotees of hispanic cultures and music lovers. The 
legends will be enjoyed both when read silently or aloud to a group. Many stories 
lend themselves to role playing, and all invite lively class discussion. 
Both the Spanish and the English interpretations begin with a fiall-page, richly 
detailed illustration, designed for use as an instructional tool. The illustration may 
be discussed as a pre-reading activity before the story and again later, to review the 
high points of the tale. The back of the book has extensive glossaries containing 
definitions for Spanish-English and then English-Spanish vocabulary. 

About the songs... 

Each legend is followed by an original song written specifically to enhance 
and extend the story. Usually the songs are composed in styles common to the 
legend's country of origin. For example, the song entitled "La camisa de Margarita 

i 



PiTTtya, "which accompanies a Peruvian legend, is written in a light Indian folk style, 
accompanied by guitar and flute. "EI Caipora " accompanies a Brazilian tale and 
highlights the driving rhythm and complex percussion of contemporary Brazilian 
music. The songs encompass many varieties of musical styles and instrumentation. 

The songs are significant because they offer different perspectives to the 
legends. Several songs, such as "El soldado y la mujer, " retell the tale in different 
words and from another viewpoint, thereby adding a whole new perspective to oral 
comprehension Certain songs, such as "El canto de la gitana, " develop one 
certain character from the accompanying story Others stress particular 
grammatical objectives, such as 'Téjeme algo de lana, " which explores and drills 
verb conjugations Finally, some songs, such as "Plantaremos una flor, " exist for 
the pure beauty of music and joy of singing. 

Needless to say, the reader cannot hear the songs in the book itself; they can, 
however, be enjoyed on the available audio-cassette The book contains both a lyric 
and a music notation page following the legend in Spanish. The song lyrics are also 
translated into English for the benefit of the non-Spanish speaking listener and 
reader. These translations are not meant to be sung because the rhythms of the 
English words do not flow with the Spanish music. It is not necessary to speak 
either English or Spanish to enjoy the songs We all know that music is a universal 
language, and the songs are catchy, powerful and delightful on their own. The 
musical notation page contains the melody, suitable to be played on piano or any 
band instrument, as well as simple guitar and/or autoharp chords. 

A word about music in the classroom... 

Why does it work so well and so effortlessly? Beginning with birth, music 
is vital to learning. Babies respond to lullabies and preschoolers learn basic syntax 
and social skills from nursery rhymes. Kindergartners memorize their letters with 
the Alphabet Song. But why does it work? Recent studies are finally shedding some 
light on the magic of music in language acquisition. 

Brain-based research tells us that music is one of the seven basic learner 
intelligences. Music, used on a regular basis along with other effective learning 
strategies, improves both students' learning and retention. 

Perhaps music works so well simply because it is fun, expressive, relaxing 
and is a natural motivator. Listening and singing is enjoyable and fulfilling both in 
a social setting and in reflective moments alone. 

Leyendas con canciones will introduce the reader and listener to Hispanic 
cultures, customs, history and sounds through reading, storytelling and music. Go 
ahead! Get started on the first one... and have a great time! 



ii 



EQNTENT5 



Note: Each legend is followed by song lyrics and musical notation 

1 . EI soldado y la mujer una leyenda del suroeste de Estados Unidos 

Song: El soldado y la mujer 2 

2. La familia Real una leyenda de Honduras 

Song: Gritan los loros 8 

3. Tío Tigre y Tío Conejo una leyenda de Venezuela 

Song: Téjeme algo de lana 14 

4. El Sombrerón iwa leyenda de Guatemala 

Song: El Somberón 20 

5. La camisa de Margarita Pareja una leyenda de Perú 

Song: La camisa de Margarita Pareja 28 

6. La profecía de la gitana una leyenda de España 

Song: El canto de la gitana 34 

7. Caipora, el Padremonte una leyenda de Brasil 

Song: El Caipora 40 

8. "Los Árboles de las Flores Blancas" una leyenda de México 

Song: La magnolia 48 

9. "El origen del nopal" una leyenda de México 

Song: Plantaremos una flor 56 

10. "Las manchas del sapo" una leyenda de Argentina 

Song: La canción del sapo 62 

English translations of legends and songs 72 
Glossaries (Spanish-English, English-Spanish) 12S 



1. El soldado y la mujer 

Una leyenda del suroeste de Estados Unidos 



Todo lo que ustedes van a escuchar en esta historia sucedió hace más 
de cincuenta años, pero la gente de esta ciudad del sur de Texas la recuerda 
como si fuera ayer. 

Martín Bemal era un joven soldado, cansado de muchos meses de 
marchar y entrenar en el ejército de San Antonio, Texas. Finalmente le 
dieron una semana de vacaciones en el mes de octubre, 1940. Era al 
anochecer, cuando él, muy fatigado, iba en el camino polvoriento hacia su 
pueblo en el valle de Texas. Solamente pensaba en saludar a sus padres y 
luego acostarse en una cama suave sin que nadie lo despertara temprano. De 
pronto, vio una figura en la distancia. La oscuridad de la noche lo hizo 
pensar que era sólo su imaginación. Su viejo Chevy se acercó más, y con 
sorpresa vio que en realidad era una mujer parada al lado de la carretera. 

La mujer le hizo señas con la mano. Martín detuvo su coche y abrió 
la ventana. Ella se le acercó y le dijo en voz baja y dulce: — Por favor, 
llévame al baile del pueblo. 

Claro que el soldado no sabía que esa noche habría im baile en su 
pueblo, y de tan cansado que estaba, no tema ningún interés en asistir, pero 
oyó ima urgencia en su voz - además, él se sintió cautivado por la mujer 
misteriosa, así que decidió llevarla al baile. 

Mientras manejaba, Martín miraba de reojo a su pasajera. Le parecía 
diferente a todas las demás mujeres que él conocía. Era bella y pálida, pelo 
largo y ojos verdes penetrantes, y se veía frágil y fuerte a la misma vez. 
Mientras que todas las mujeres de esa época generalmente llevaban vestidos 
que apenas cubrían las rodülas, esa mujer llevaba un hermoso vestido negro, 
bordado con hilos de muchos colores; le llegaba hasta los tobülos y parecía 
ser del siglo anterior. Ella lo miraba sin decir nada, y para iniciar una 
conversación él le pregimtó: — ¿Cómo se llama usted? 

— Me llamo Cruz Delgada — le contestó la mujer. 

Ella le sonrió mirándolo con ojos delicados y tristes. No hablaron 
más durante el resto del camino. Él estaba completamente fascinado con la 
mujer. 




2 



3 



Cuando llegaron, el baile ya estaba en plena marcha. El aire vibraba 
con los tonos y ritmos de la ruidosa orquesta y la risa de las parejas bailando. 
Los vieron entrar, pero el soldado no reconoció a nadie y nadie los saludó. 
Todos los miraban con curiosidad: Martín, todavía vestido de militar, y Cruz 
Delgada, resplandeciente con su hermoso pero anticuado vestido. Cuando 
él la invitó a bailar, vió cierta expresión de duda en su cara, pero sin 
embargo, lo siguió a la pista de baile. Martín empezó a bailar, pero la 
mujer se paró en la pista sin moverse. Cruz, mirando desconcertada el 
destello de colores que emanaban de los cuerpos bailando, y conftmdida por 
los ritmos pulsantes de la música de "rock," lo miró con ojos grandes de 
desesperación. Para darle confianza, él sonreía y seguía bailando, pero Cruz 
empezó a llorar y cubrió su cara con vergüenza. Al ver a la pobre Cruz sin 
saber qué hacer, algunas parejas dejaban de bailar para observar el pequeño 
drama, y algunas muchachas se reían cubriéndose los rostros con sus manos. 
Pero en ese momento, la orquesta empezó a tocar un vals famoso del siglo 
anterior. Cruz se secó las lágrimas con el encaje de su blusa, y con gran 
dignidad y sus ojos brillando por anticipado, extendió los brazos para bailar 
con Martín. 

Y así bailaron y bailaron. Todo el mundo los miraba con admiración. 
Cruz parecía estar transportada a otro mundo. A veces ella inclinaba su 
cabeza hacia atrás y reía, otras veces bailaba con los ojos cerrados, perdida 
en la música. La orquesta, notando su felicidad, tocaba vals tras vals. 

El baile acabó a medianoche. Cruz tomó el brazo de Martín y salieron 
del baile, cansados y contentos. Había fiío en el aire de la noche, y el cuerpo 
de la mujer temblaba, así que él, muy caballeroso, le puso su chaqueta 
militar sobre los hombros. Subieron al Chevy, y el soldado le contó de su 
servicio militar y de su familia. Ella escuchaba atentamente pero no decía 
nada. Poco a poco él sintió que ella estaba volviéndose triste otra vez. 

— ¿Le pasa algo? — finalmente le preguntó. 

Ella parecía no escucharlo y no le contestó. A la luz de la luna él vio 
una sola lágrima correr por su pálida mejilla. 

Martín quiso dejarla en su casa, pero cuando llegaron al mismo sitio 
donde la había visto por primera vez, Cruz simplemente dijo con su voz 
baja y dulce — Gracias por todo. Fue un baile inolvidable. 

Suavemente, le tocó la cara a Martín, y su mano le dejó una sensación 
agradable pero fiia. Después salió del vehículo y desapareció en la 
oscuridad. 



4 



Martín la vio irse, sabiendo que quería verla otra vez. Con tal 
propósito había dejado su chaqueta militar con ella, pues tendría una buena 
excusa para volver a verla pronto. Se fijó en el paisaje para poder volver al 
mismo lugar. 

Cuando llegó a su casa, su familia ya dormía. Mientras estaba 
acostándose en la oscuridad, en su propia cama, aún su mente continuaba con 
la imagen encantada de Cruz Delgada en la pista de baile. Cuando él se 
despertó a media mañana, con el brillo del sol pasando a través de su 
ventana, su primer pensamiento fue acerca de esa mujer. Después de saludar 
a su familia, tomó su coche y se dirigió al camino buscando el lugar donde 
había dejado a Cruz la noche anterior. A la luz del día, el lugar estaba 
desolado y quieto. En la distancia sólo vio una casucha de adobe. Caminó 
sobre la tierra seca, entre piedras y cactus, hasta pararse frente a la puerta de 
madera. Martín arregló su pelo nerviosamente y luego golpeó la puerta. 
Pasaron unos minutos y nadie contestó. Volvió a llamar varias veces, hasta 
que finalmente una anciana abrió la puerta un poco, y lo miró sin decir 
nada. 

— Quiero ver a Cruz Delgada, por favor — le dijo el soldado — ¿sabe 
usted dónde puedo encontrarla? 

La anciana lo miró seriamente. — No es posible — le contestó bruscamente, 
y trató de cerrar la puerta. 

— Pero Cruz tiene mi chaqueta militar. Se la presté anoche — le dijo 
Martín inmediatamente. 

La anciana lo miró incrédula, y después de una gran pausa le volvió 
a decir — ^No es posible — pero su voz temblaba. Lentamente salió de la 
casa, y sin decir ninguna palabra, y con un gesto de su cabeza, le indicó que 
la siguiera. Caminaron hacia la parte posterior de la casucha y siguieron por 
una vereda vieja hasta llegar a un camposanto pequeño. Ella se paró frente 
a una lápida alrededor de la cual crecían flores hermosas. Con sorpresa el 
soldado vio que su chaqueta militar estaba colgada cuidadosamente sobre la 
lápida. Él quitó la chaqueta para leer la inscripción. 

Cruz Delgada 
1842—1873 

Un escalofrío corrió por sus huesos, y anonadado, volvió a mirar a la 
anciana. Ella le dijo con lágrimas en los ojos — Cruz Delgada era mi madre. 




1. EI soldado y la mujer 

Words and music by Patti Lozano 



Un joven soldado manejando fui yo 
Cuando la vi parada en el camino oscuro 
Abrí mi ventana y se acercó 

Y me dijo "Llévame al baile, por favor" 

Subió a mi coche pero poco habló 

Me quedé mirando a sus ojos tan místicos 

Su linda cara pálida me encantó 

Y juntos fuimos al baile 



Estribillo: Y no puedo olvidar su felicidad cuando estuvo bailando 
No puedo olvidar la suave caricia de esa mujer 



2. La música moderna la hizo llorar 

Los sonidos y los ruidos no pudo aguantar 
Hasta que la guitarra empezó a tocar 
La música que ayer 

Bailamos y bailamos juntos los dos 
Hasta la hora que el baile acabó 
Con el frío de la noche su cuerpo temblaba 
Y así la cubrí con mi chaqueta militar 



Estribillo 

3. La qmse dejar en su casa, pero no - 
Me hizo dejarla en el camino oscuro. 
Tan sola y pequeña que le tuve pena 
Y así la dejé con mi chaqueta militar 



Volví para verla, una viejita me vio, 
Describí la mujer y la viejita lloró 
Me llevó al camposanto, y ¡ay qué espanto 
En la lápida estaba mi chaqueta militar 




Estribillo 



1. EI soldado y la mujer 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 
Am 



Un JO- ven sol^ da- dcr ma- ne- jan- do ff^ fui y 



Un jo- ven sol^ da- dcr' ma- ne- jan- do ft*^ fui yo 
(Su-) bió a mi co- che pe- ro po- co ha- bló. 



Cuan- do 
Me que- 



Am 



A' 



fe 



!a vi pa- ra- da en el ca- mi- no o- sou- -ro,"*" Ab^ rí "•'mi ~*'ven^ ta- na y 

de- - mi-ran- do a sus o- jos tan mis- ti- eos, Su lin- da:a- ra pá- li-da me 



Dm ] 


Am 


E7 


se a- cer- có Y me 
en- - can-tó, Y 


di- jo, "Llé-va- me al 


bS- le, por fa- vor. Su- 



2. Am 



Estribillo: F 



^5 



jun- tos fiii- mos al f)ai- le, Y No puedo ol- vi- dar 

C G C 



tí 



- do. 



su fe- li- ci- dad - cuan- do es- tu- vo bai- lan- 
C G 



31 



No pue-do oí- vi- dar 



—0 * 

la sua-ve ca- ri- - cia de e- sa mu- jer -. 



2. La familia Real 

Una leyenda de Honduras 



La capital de Honduras es Tegucigalpa. Ahora es una ciudad grande, 
pero hace mucho tiempo, cuando esta leyenda se llevó a cabo, era un pueblo 
pequeño y pintoresco. En las afueras de Tegucigalpa existe una antigua calle 
llamada Floreana. A mitad del camino y a la derecha hay una casa pequeña, 
bonita - y vacía. Nadie ha vivido en esa casa por muchas generaciones. 
Todavía hay vecinos que viven a ambos lados de la casa y gozan de la 
sombra que brindan los altos árboles del patio de la casa vacía. Pero nadie 
se atreve a vivir en ella. ¿Quieren saber por qué? 

Pues, dicen que hace muchos años vivía una famiha cuyo apellido era 
"Real." La familia estaba formada por el papá, Don Periquito Real, su 
esposa, Misia Pepa y su única hija, Laura. Cuando la familia paseaba por 
el centro, todo el mundo notaba su presencia. Era imposible no verlos 
porque se vestían con ropa floreada y de muchos colores vibrantes. Sobre 
todo les gustaban las distintas tonalidades de azul, iluminadas con rojo, 
amarillo y verde muy brillantes. También era imposible no escucharlos 
porque no cesaban de hablar con voces fuertes y ásperas. Si por casualidad 
veían algún conocido durante sus paseos, la familia dejaba de caminar, se 
detenía, y saludaba desesperadamente con las manos gritando — ¡HOLA! 
¿CÓMO ESTÁS? ¡HOLA! ¿COMO ESTAS? ¡HOLA! ¿COMO ESTAS?— 
hasta que la desafortunada persona, con mucha vergüenza, les contestaba. 

Don Periquito tenía una voz muy grave y fuerte; Misia Pepa tenía una 
voz como una sirena ronca de ambulancia, y la voz de Laura era aguda y 
chillona. No era nada agradable escuchar sus saludos, pero a la familia 
Real, no le importaba que la gente mirara a otro lado al verlos acercar 
porque estaban muy entretenidos escuchando sus propias voces. 

Ellos se creían muy inteligentes. Eran ricos y habían viajado a los 
Estados Unidos. Misia Pepa sabía unas pocas palabras en inglés y las decía 
orguUosamente y con mucha frecuencia, aunque no las entendía muy bien. 
Llamaba a su hija "Lora" o "Lorita," como se dice "Laura" en inglés. Solía 
decir a todo el mundo —¡MI LORITA CANTA COMO UN PAJARO 
EXOTICO! 




8 



9 



En las fiestas, se oían las voces de la familia Real sobre las de todos 
los invitados. Si alguien contaba un chiste, los de la familia Real eran los 
primeros en reirse a carcajadas, muchas veces antes del final del chiste. En 
el mercado, por encima de las voces suplicantes de los vendedores, se 
distinguía muy bien la voz chillona de Misia Pepa repitiendo — ¿CUANTO 
CUESTA? ¿CUÁNTO CUESTA?— o —¡QUIERO DOS! ¡QUIERO DOS! 

La gente de Tegucigalpa soportaba a la familia Real, y no les hacía 
mucho caso, hasta que los tres empezaron a arruinar la tranquilidad del 
pueblo con sus chismes aburridos. Todo lo que escuchaban por casualidad 
en un lugar, lo repetían en otro. Repetían sin entender, repetían sin darse 
cuenta que sus frases pudieran hacer mucho daño. Por ejemplo, un día en 
el salón de belleza, Misia Pepa por casualidad descubrió un secreto, y luego 
lo comentó por todo el pueblo —¡LA SEÑORA VELASQUEZ ES CALVA! 
¡LA SEÑORA VELASQUEZ ES CALVA! 

Otro día Don Periquito, con mucha alegría, informó a todo el pueblo 
que Don Tomás debía una cierta cantidad de dinero a Don Ramón, y que 
Don Tomás tenía el dinero escondido pero no pensaba pagarlo. 

A causa de los chismes de la familia Real la gente del pueblo 
comenzaba a enojarse uno con otro. Finalmente, los residentes decidieron 
no incluir más a la familia Real en ninguna fiesta ni reunión del pueblo. 

Esto no los molestaba en absoluto. Se quedaban más y más tiempo 
en su casa, conversando juntos y riéndose a carcajadas. Descansaban a 
gusto en sus sillas en el patio bajo la sombra de los árboles, platicando desde 
la madrugada hasta el anochecer. Como ya no iban al centro, ya no tenían 
más chinchorrerías para compartir, pero estaban muy entretenidos repitiendo 
los mismos chismes y frases viejas. 

Llegó un día en el cual la familia Real dejó de ir al centro para hacer 
sus compras en el mercado. No querían perder los preciosos minutos de 
plática en el patio. En realidad, no era necesario comprar comida en el 
mercado, porque de los árboles de su patio caían nueces y frutas todos los 
días. Los tres estaban siunamente contentos comiendo frutas y nueces, y 
nada más. La familia ya ni siquiera entraba a su casa para dormir en la 
noche; se quedaban afiiera, en el patio. Nadie del pueblo volvió a verlos, pero 
oían el constante murmurar de sus voces durante las noches cálidas y 
húmedas. Pasaron muchos meses viviendo de esa manera. 

Un día, un vecino preocupado entró al patio de la familia Real, pero 
salió en seguida muy asustado y gritando — ¡Ay, ay, ay! ¡Es una brujería! 



10 



Pronto volvió con un grupo de vecinos. Entraron al patio y se 
pararon allí muy sorprendidos y estupefactos. Aún estaba allí la familia 
Real, platicando en el patio, pero era difícil reconocerlos porque parecían 
más pericos que personas. Su ropa de colores vibrantes se había convertido 
en plumas de color azul, rojo, amarillo y verde brillante; sus brazos que 
habían saludado desesperadamente se habían convertido en alas que agitaban 
el aire, sus narices se habían convertido en picos largos y duros. Casi se 
habían olvidado como hablar y solamente repetían fi-ases cortas — ¡HOLA! 
¿CÓMO ESTÁS? ¿CUANTO CUESTA? ¡QUIERO DOS! ¡LA SEÑORA 
VELASQUEZ ES CALVA! 

Cuando los tres se dieron cuenta de la presencia de los vecinos, 
gritaron y volaron a la seguridad de las ramas del árbol. Allá se posaron 
entre las hojas, mirando hacia abajo, chillando con indignación — ¡HOLA! 
¿CÓMO ESTAS? 

Nunca más se bajaron de los árboles. Ahora que eran pericos, 
estaban más cómodos arriba entre las hojas. Por esta razón, la pequeña casa 
de la calle Floreana en Tegucigalpa aún hoy permanece vacía; desde sus 
árboles muchos loros chillan y gritan como en un concierto absurdo. 

Hoy en día se puede escuchar a estos pericos de colores brillantes en 
muchas partes de Honduras. Chillan, gritan y repiten sin cesar. En honor 
de la familia Real, imos se llaman periquitos y otros se llaman "¡loritos 
reales!" 



2. Gritan los loros 

Words and music by Patti Lozano 



Toda la noche escucho de mi cama 
El ruido, el chillido, el pequeño melodrama 
Me enojo y no duermo en toda la semana 
Y tiro mi reloj y quiebro la ventana 

Estribillo: Gritan los loros ¿Por qué gritan tanto 
Sin cualquiera sensibilidad? 
Hablan los loros ¿Por qué hablan tanto 
De chismes - no de verdades? 



Chipi chipi rácasu Quiri papa tócanu 
Bonito al principio y feo después 
Chipi chipi rácasu Quiri papa tócanu 
Bonito al principio y feo después 

2. Viene el sol y suena la campana 

Pero tengo mucho sueño durante la mañana 
Cuando cierro los ojos, una voz proclama - 
"¡El canto de los loros siempre está clavado!" 



Estribillo 



3. No me escuchas pero hablas y hablas 
Y nunca entiendes pero todo repites 
Te emocionas mucho y mueves las manitas 
¡Casi te crecen un pico y alitas! 

Estribillo 




2. Gritan los loros 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 
Am 




12 



To- da la no- che es^ cu- cho de mi ca- ma. El ru- 



1- do, el era- lli- ^do, nr el ^pe- que- ño me- lo- dra- ma. Me e- 



1 J J' j' ' j' ' i' :j' j> J j' ^' 

"•no- "*jo "*y ■•no ■*duer-'*mo "*^en "*to- "«ida :¿ la "•se-"*ma- na 



# — » 



ti- ro mi re- loj y quie- bro la ven- ta- na. 

Estribillo: A FKm E 



# 



M'lrJ I n 



Gri- tan los lo- ros, ¿Por qué gritan tan- to, sincual-qie- ra sen-si- bi-li- dad? 
A llm Bm'' E 



Ha-blan los lo-ros, ¿Por qué ha- blan tan- to de chis- mes, no de ver- da- - des? 
D A 



»" > J' > J' j, Mi' i- i' j' j) i i 

ri r*Q_ na tn- r3- ~^nii Rí 



i 




~* -3^ — ' :«L ^ • 

'ni-^to ^ al ^rin- cT- pió y ft- o después 



3. Tío Tigre y Tío Conejo 

Una leyenda de Venezuela 



A través de las Américas hay una gran abundancia de cuentos acerca 
del pequeño pero astuto Tío Conejo que siempre vence a su rival, el grande 
pero bobo Tío Tigre. Probablemente esas leyendas tienen su origen en 
cuentos creados por los obreros pobres que trabajaban en las haciendas y 
plantaciones ricas del siglo pasado. Veamos entonces, cómo Tío Conejo 
sale victorioso otra vez. 

Era el primer día de invierno, cuando Tío Conejo, sentado en su 
cocina, se sentió muy deprimido. Él veía por la ventana que aimque había 
mucho sol, las ramas de los árboles estaban casi desnudas de hojas. Al 
mismo tiempo escuchaba angustiadamente el bramido feroz del viento que 
salía de su chimenea. 

— ¡Ay de mí! — gimió el conejo — ¿Qué será de mí? ¿Cómo voy a 
sobrevivir el invierno? 

Todos los vecinos le habían comentado desde septiembre, que este 
invierno iba a ser uno de los más duros. Su amigo Mapache había acumulado 
y escondido muchas nueces y granos, y ahora descansaba en paz dentro de 
su casa. Oso tem'a un abrigo grueso de piel para no sentir el frío, y además, 
durante la temporada invernal dormía a gusto al fondo de su cueva oscura. 
Pero Tío Conejo no se había preparado de ninguna manera. En efecto, él se 
había burlado de los demás mientras hacían los preparativos. 

— ^El trabajo es para los bobos — siempre decía Tío Conejo riéndose. 

Ahora, aunque no lo iba a admitir ante sus vecinos, se había 
equivocado. En la despensa había dos recipientes de pepinos, nada más. 

¿Cómo aguantaré el frío sin ni siquiera un suéter para taparme? — se 
preocupaba — ¿Cómo encontraré comida cuando esté nevando? ¡ Ay! ¡Me 
moriré de hambre! 

Al poco rato salió de su casa para caminar y pensar en su situación 
lamentable. No le ayudaba que el viento frío lo hiciera estremecerse casi en 
seguida. Sin embargo, de repente debajo de un roble retorcido vió algo de 
muchos colores. Tío Conejo se acercó con curiosidad y descubrió que era un 
abrigo hecho de lana de buena calidad. Era azul con adornos verdes. 




14 



15 



amarillos y morados, y con capucha y botones elegantes. Él miraba a todos 
lados buscando al dueño del hermoso abrigo, pero no vio a nadie. 
Finalmente se lo puso, volvió a la vereda y siguió caminando. Ahora sonreía 
contento y hasta silbaba porque el abrigo le había quedado perfecto. 

— Un problema está resuelto - ¡y fiie fácil! — pensó él, — tengo suerte 
y soy listo... ahora - qué hacer acerca del problema de la comida... 

Estaba tan perdido en sus pensamientos, que saltó sorprendido 
cuando Tío Tigre apareció en el camino y le gritó — Tío Conejo, ¡qué lindo 
abrigo tienes! ¿Dónde lo conseguiste? 

Al conejo se le ocurrió decirle — ¿Este abrigo? Pues, yo lo tejí — 
Le contestó con indiferencia, dando una vuelta para mostrar mejor su 
hermoso abrigo. 

—¿Tú sabes tejer? — preguntó Tío Tigre incrédulo. 

— ¡Claro que sí! — dijo el conejo. — Paso todas las noches tejiendo 
en mi casa. ¡Me encanta tejer! 

Tío Tigre miró con anhelo el abrigo y pensó en el frío del invierno. 

— Conejo, ¿podrías hacerme un abrigo azul también? Te pago lo que 
quieras. 

El conejo pareció considerar la oferta, y luego contestó — Pues mi 
problema no es el dinero, sino que si yo te tejo un abrigo igual de elegante 
como el mío, no tendré tiempo para ir de compras, ni cocinar mis comidas. 
Así que ... lo siento mucho, pero no te puedo ayudar. 

El conejo se puso la capucha y fingió irse. 

— ¡No, no, no! ¡Espera! — gritó el tigre — ¡Yo puedo hacer tus 
compras y cocinar tus comidas! 

—¿Y también traerás la lana que tú deseas? — preguntó el conejo. 

— ¡Sí! No hay problema. Te traeré lana azul y haré comidas muy 
sabrosas mientras tejes — le contestó el tigre, imaginándose caminar por el 
centro con su lindo abrigo azul. 

— Muy bien — dijo Tío Conejo — Mañana me traes la lana y ya mismo 
podremos empezar. 

Al día siguiente Tío Tigre llegó a la puerta de Tío Conejo con un 
montón de lana azul de la mejor cahdad en sus brazos. El conejo lo recibió, 
tomó la lana y lo mandó al mercado para comprar la comida. Luego 
rápidamente, antes de que regresara el tigre, el conejo sacó de debajo de su 
cama un viejo libro de tejido para aprender cómo tejer; el libro había 
pertenecido a su abuela. Aunque era perezozo. Tío Conejo también era muy 



16 

inteligente y en poco tiempo aprendió a tejer cuadrados de lana. 

— ¡Has avanzado bastante! — dijo el tigre contentísimo al volver con 
bolsas llenas de comida. 

Tío Tigre empezó a cocinar mientras el conejo tejía en la sala. 

Así pasaron todo el invierno. Afuera la nieve caía y las tempestades 
eran furiosas; los lagos se congelaban y los carámbanos colgaban de las 
ramas de los árboles, pero el conejo nunca tuvo que salir fuera de su casa. 
Se quedó en su mecedora al lado de la hoguera, tejiendo miles de cuadrados 
de lana azul. Engordó bastante con las comidas sabrosas del tigre. 

Tío Tigre, pobre bobo, estaba contento de ver la pila de cuadros 
azules, se sentía muy cansado de tanto trabajo. Todos los días tenía que ir 
al mercado, caminando en la nieve con mucho esfuerzo, porque el pequeño 
conejo comía mucho. Sin embargo, el tigre infeliz había adelgazado mucho. 

— ¿Está listo mi abrigo azul? — preguntaba cada día al llegar con las 
bolsas de lana y alimentos. 

— Está casi listo — siempre contestaba el conejo. 

— No olvides la capucha y los botones — siempre le recordaba el 
tigre antes de meterse en la cocina para empezar sus tareas hogareñas. 

Una mañana, cuando Tío Tigre caminaba hacia la casa de Tío Conejo 
se dio cuenta que el hielo en los techos estaba derretiéndose. Escuchó las 
canciones de los pájaros, miró las hojas verdes nuevas en las ramas de los 
árboles y de repente supo que había llegado la primavera. 

— ¿Está listo mi abrigo azul? — le preguntó con poca esperanza al 
conejo cuando abrió la puerta. 

— Está casi hsto — le dijo el conejo como de costumbre, mirando más 
al día soleado que al tigre. 

— Pues, ya no lo necesito — dijo el tigre con una voz triste y fatigada. 

Tío Conejo quiso salir de su casa - quiso correr, saltar y jugar en el 
campo. No solamente había sobrevivido el invierno terrible, sino que se 
sentía descansado y lleno de energía. 

— Sí — dijo el conejo — ^ya no lo necesitas - pero lo vas a necesitar el 
invierno que viene. 

Cariñosamente puso su mano sobre el hombro del tigre y añadió 
— Mira, te haré un favor. Yo recogeré y guardaré todos los cuadros de lana - 
y cuando vuelva el frío, tú vienes otra vez a mi casa para cocinar - ¡y yo 
terminaré tu abrigo! 

A Tío Tigre le gustó este plan y se despidió cansado pero esperanzado 
- y Tío Conejo fue muy contento al campo para reunirse con sus amigos. 




3. Téjeme algo de lana 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 

Téjeme algo de lana 
Un abrigo o un suéter azul 
Para el frío del invierno 
Téjelo tierno 

Un abrigo o un suéter azul 



Téjeme algo de lana 

Un abrigo que han de admirar 

Para protegerme 

Favor de hacerme 

Un abrigo que han de admirar. 



Estribillo: Tejes y tejiste, ahora estás tejiendo 
Siempre has tejido, y siempre tejerás 
De joven tejías día tras día 
Y quieres tejer cada día más y más 

2. Téjeme algo de lana mientras tejes no te molestaré 
Te traigo las bebidas te compro las comidas 
Mientras tejes no te molestaré 

Téjeme algo de lana pon botones y la capucha también 
Seré tu sirviente absolutamente 
Pon botones y la capucha también 

Estribillo 

3. Cuando muy joven era consulté con una costurera \^ 
Le pedí que me hiciera una bandera 
Pero un abrigo me tejió 

Siempre mi abrigo llevaba el invierno ya no me enfriaba \ 

Mi cuerpo crecía fue una agonía 
Un diciembre ya no me quedó 




Estribillo 



3. Téjeme algo de lana 



18 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 
C 



j j j * * é ^ 

Té- je- me aP - go 



la- na 



de 



Un a- 
Un a- 

























1 r- 






m 










































m MM 





bri- go o un sué- ter a- zul 

bri- go que han de ad- nii- rar 



Pa- ra el 
Pa- 



frí- o del in- vier- 

ra pro- te- ger- 
C 



no Té- je- lo tier- - no, Un a- 

me Fa-vor de ha- cer- - me un a- 



m 






















— j 




— • 















bri- go o un sué- ter 



a- zul. 



bri- go 
G 



que han de ad-mi- rar 

C 



Te- jes y te- ^jis- te, a- ho- fá es- tás te- jien- do, 
G C ' ' 



siem- pre has te- ji- do 

F Em 



y siem- pre te- je- 
Am 



ras 
Dm 



De 



"•"jo-"* ven "•'te- jí- as 



di- a tras di- - a, 

G C 



quie- res te- jer ca- da di- a más y 



4. El Sombrerón 

Una leyenda de Guatemala 



Hace muchos años en Guatemala vivía un hombrecito conocido por 
el nombre de "El Sombrerón." Dicen que era tan pequeño que cabía en la 
palma de una mano. Siempre llevaba un sombrero enorme que cubría su 
cara. Tocaba la guitarra y cantaba hermosas canciones hechiceras, y siempre 
era precedido por cuatro muías de carga. Aimque era muy guapo y 
carismático, era mala suerte verlo, porque siempre traía tristeza y tragedia. 
Escuchen entonces la lamentable historia de la hermosa Celina y El 
Sombrerón. 

Celina era una muchacha de dieciséis años que vivía en una casa 
humilde a la orilla de un pueblito de Guatemala. Sus papás, Don Antonio 
Bemal y su esposa Ana tenían una pequeña tienda de tortillas en el centro 
del pueblo. La tortilleria era un lugar muy popular porque, diariamente, 
todos los del pueblo iban allí para comprar sus tortillas frescas y calientes. 

Don Antonio y Doña Ana estaban muy orgullosos de su linda hija y 
la querian mucho. Todos los días Celina trabajaba en la tortilleria con sus 
papás: se paraba detrás del mostrador mezclando la masa mientras saludaba 
alegremente a los clientes que entraban. Todos habían conocido a la 
muchacha desde su niñez y siempre sonreían al verla porque, además de ser 
muy trabajadora, era muy simpática y dinámica. 

Una tarde, un vecino, Don Benito Amador, entró a la tortilleria y 
anunció: — ¡Qué extraño! Hay cuatro muías amarradas a un lado de la 
tienda. 

Otra vecina. Doña Rosa Flores, también estaba en ese momento 
comprando sus tortillas y dijo a los Bemal — Quizás éstas son las muías de 
El Sombrerón. ¡Deben de esconder a Celina porque El Sombrerón busca a las 
muchachas como ella! 

Don Antonio salió con Don Benito para mirar las muías amarradas, 
pero ya no estaban. Los clientes terminaron de hacer sus compras y se 
despidieron sin hablar más del asunto. 

Esa misma noche, mientras la famiüa se preparaba para acostarse, fue 
sorprendida por el "clip clop clip clop" de las pezuñas de animales que 




20 



21 



pasaban por el camino frente a su casa. Las pezuñas hacían un sonido 
extraño, casi espectral, antes de desvanecerse en el silencio de la noche. 

Los tres Bemal se acostaron en sus camas. Celina, sin embargo, no 
pudo dormir porque desde afuera de su ventana abierta escuchaba la música 
más bonita que había oído en toda su vida. ¿Era ésta celestial o sensual? No 
podía decidir, pero sí sabía que no podía ni deseaba mover siquiera un 
músculo. Sentía su cuerpo hechizado y esperaba que la música continuara 
toda la eternidad. Escuchaba los acordes de una guitarra, sus arpegios 
cayendo como un arroyo juguetón, y la voz apasionada de un hombre joven 
cantando palabras de amor y deseo. 

En su estupor Celina se atrevió a preguntar — ¿Quién me da esa 
serenata tan bonita? 

Sin embargo, las notas siguieron y nadie contestó. 

La música encantadora continuó durante toda la noche y Celina se 
quedó despierta escuchándola, y no durmió ni descansó. Por la mañana en la 
tortillería, la pobre muchacha tenía ojeras y se veía muy cansada. 

— ¿Qué te sucede hoy, hija? — preguntó su mamá — ¿estás enferma? 

— No, mamá — dijo Celina — al contrario - estoy muy contenta, 
aunque sí estoy cansada. Es que toda la noche escuché la música hermosa 
y no quise dormir. 

—¿Cuál música? — preguntó su mamá — tu papá y yo no oímos nada 
de música. 

Celina se reía de que sus papás hubieran dormido tan profundamente 
que no habían escuchado la serenata tan exquisita. 

Esa noche la familia de nuevo escuchó las pezuñas espectrales y 
Celina sintió una emoción viva y agradable. La música encantada comenzó 
tan pronto como la muchacha colocara su cabeza en la ahnohada. 

—Alguien me quiere mucho - ¿quién podrá ser? — pensó la muchacha 
antes de perderse completamente en la música. 

Cuando escuchaba las notas, ella tenía la sensación de que estaba 
volando como un quetzal sobre la selva tropical... la sensación de que se 
cubría con un manto de terciopelo y se sentaba frente a una hoguera en el 
invierno... tenía la sensación de que estaba cruzando las olas vigorosas en un 
barco de vela... Esa noche otra vez, la música fue maravillosa, pero en la 
mañana la pobre Celina amaneció aún más cansada que el día anterior. No 
mezclaba la masa con mucho entusiasmo, ni tenía interés de conversar con 
los clientes - en realidad Celina solamente soñaba con la llegada de la noche, 
con el deseo de escuchar ima vez más la música seductora. 



22 



Noche tras noche la hermosura de la música la dejaba débil y 
confundida. Finalmente una noche ya no pudo aguantar su curiosidad - tenía 
que saber quién le cantaba con esa voz cautivante. Caminó de puntillas a la 
ventana, movió las cortinas un poco y miró a hurtadillas hacia el patio. Allá, 
bañado por la luz de la luna, vio a un hombre muy pequeño que estaba 
sentado en una rama baja del árbol. Llevaba un sombrero grandísimo por 
lo cual Cehna no pudo distinguir la cara. Llevaba un elegante trajecito de 
vaquero - desde la chaqueta negra hasta las espuelas de plata que lucían con 
el brillo de la luna. Celina suspiró pero aunque no hizo ningún otro 
movimiento, de repente el hombrecito levantó la cabeza y clavó sus ojos 
negros directamente en los de Celina. Ella sintió la intensidad de su mirada 
hasta el fondo de su alma, y desde ese momento estuvo completamente 
enamorada de El Sombrerón. 

De allí en adelante Celina no podía comer ni trabajar. Sus padres se 
desesperaban. Ellos apenas reconocían a su hija que estaba tan pálida, 
delgada y callada que parecía andar entre sueños. Los clientes que iban a la 
tortillería notaban también los cambios en la muchacha y se preocupaban. 

— ¿Qué tiene Celina? ¿Está enferma? — se preguntaban unos a otros. 

Un día Doña Ana se confió a su amiga, la Sra. Flores — ^No sé qué 
pasa con mi hija... no entiendo qué pasa.... y no sé cómo ayudarla... 

Se retorcía las manos mientras hablaba y trataba de controlar las 
lágrimas que escapaban de sus ojos. — Ya no se comunica conmigo. 
Solamente habla de la música... 

— ¡La música! — exclamó la Sra. Flores asustada — ^y tú, comadre, 
¿escuchas la música también? 

— ^No, yo no oigo nada — dijo la mamá. 

— ¡Ay, amiga! — dijo la señora Flores — ^no quiero decírtelo, pero 
temo que Celina esté escuchando la música de El Sombrerón. Creo que se 
ha enamorado de él. 

Doña Ana se puso frenética. — ¿Qué hago? ¡Aconséjame, por favor! 
Celina es mi única hija. ¡No puedo perderla! 

— Pues, quizás podrías meterla en un convento — sugirió la señora 
— porque El Sombrerón es un fantasma y no puede entrar en ninguna iglesia. 

Ese mismo día, con tristeza pero también esperanza, e ignorando las 
débiles protestas de su hija, Don Antonio y Doña Ana viajaron muy lejos 
hasta Uegar al convento de Santa Rosario de la Cruz, y allí dejaron a Celina 
a cargo de las monjas, encerrada en el convento. 

En la carretera de regreso al pueblo Doña Ana empezó a llorar 



23 



— ¡Cómo la voy a extrañar! 

Don Antonio trató de consolarla diciendo: — Sí, será difícil sin nuestra 
hija, pero tenemos que protegerla de cualquiera manera que sea posible - y 
por lo menos en la iglesia la voz de El Somberón no la alcanzará. 

Pensó un rato más y añadió: — Celina es joven... y después de 
algunos meses habrá olvidado a ese hombrecito y entonces la traeremos otra 
vez a vivir con nosotros. 

Al escuchar las palabras de su esposo Doña Ana se alegró un poco. 

Al anochecer, como de costumbre, se escucharon las pezuñas en frente 
de la humilde casa - las pezuñas de las cuatro muías de El Sombrerón. Como 
siempre el hombrecito se acomodó ftiera de la ventana para dar serenata a 
Celina, pero inmediatamente presintió la ausencia de la muchacha. Durante 
la noche la buscó ansiosamente a través de las ventanas de los dormitorios 
de todas las casas del pueblo. Esa noche todos los habitantes del pueblo 
escucharon el sonido de las pezuñas misteriosas. Por la madrugada El 
Sombrerón se dio cuenta que su búsqueda era en vano y se quedó triste y 
silencioso. Dejó su guitarra y no volvió a cantar. Por primera vez en su vida 
sintió un dolor inaguantable en su corazón: El Sombrerón se había 
enamorado de Celina. 

En el convento las monjas atendían a la muchacha con mucho cariño 
y trataban de aliviar su sufrimiento. Rezaban por su recuperación, se 
sentaban al lado de su cama para contarle cuentos de la biblia y decoraban 
su cuarto sencillo con flores de los campos cercanos. Pero a Celina ya no le 
importaba nada. La reahdad era que no quería existir sin El Sombrerón. No 
se levantaba, no comía, ni hablaba. Una noche una monja enfró en su cuarto 
y encontró a la pobre Celina en su cama con su carita hacia la ventana y sus 
ojos mirando por las cortinas hacia la luna. Celina había fallecido. 

Fue una tarde triste e inolvidable cuando los papás trajeron el cuerpo 
de Celina a su pueblo ofra vez. Todos vinieron a la casa para despedir a la 
muchacha por última vez. La sala estaba llena de lamentos de quienes la 
habían conocido y amado desde su niñez. De pronto, todas las voces de los 
habitantes del pueblo frieron ahogadas por el sonido de un llanto agonizante 
parecido al grito de un lobo con profrmdo dolor. Las paredes de la casa se 
estremecieron con la intensidad del sollozo. 

— ¡Madre de Dios! — gritó Don Benito Amador. 

Pero nadie - ni siquiera la Señora Flores - pensó en la posibilidad de 
que ese llanto brotara de El Sombrerón que acababa de descubrir que su 
querida Celina estaba sin vida en la sala de su propia casa. Este era el llanto 



24 

de un corazón destrozado. 

Al anochecer el pueblo, con mucho pesar, enterró el cuerpo de la 
joven Celina en el cementerio del pueblo. 

A la mañana siguiente, cuando todos saüeron de sus casas, vieron algo 
increíble. ¡El pueblo entero se había transformado en una tierra de fantasía! 
Los techos estaban cubiertos con gotas de agua de colores, luciendo en el sol 
del amanecer - ¡ y las calles! Sobre las piedras corría un río con agua que 
parecía un arcoiris brillando con un millón de diamantes. 

— ¿Qué milagro es éste? — se preguntaban incrédulos. 

Nadie sabía la verdad: las gotas platinadas en los techos y el río 
colorido en la calle, eran en realidad las lágrimas cristalizadas de El 
Sombrerón, un recuerdo visible de todo lo que él había llorado por su querida 
Celina. 



25 



□ 



□ 



4. El Sombrerón 



tu 
5T] 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 



La hermosa Celina no comia 
No quería trabajar y no quería amanecer 
Y sus pobres papás se preocupaban 
Del hechizo que la transformó asi 



Estribillo: El Sombrerón es coquetón 

El Sombrerón es maldición 

El Somberón hay que guardar a las hijas 
De su canción 



El Sombrerón es coquetón 

El Sombrerón es maldición 

El Somberón la que escucha su guitarra 

Muere de pasión 



2. Y la luz de la luna la tocaba 

Reflejaba en los ojos y en el pelo también 
Por la ventana abierta escuchaba 
Una voz que le cantaba, "Amor, ven." 



Estribillo 



Aunque trate de proteger a su hija, papá 
Y mamá, aunque la quiera encerrar 
No pueden evitar la luz de la luna 
Viene el amor 
Con todo su dolor 

A confundir el corazón, el Sombrerón 

3. La hermosa Celina fallecía 

Sin el Sombrerón ya no quería existir 
El Sombrerón ya tiene llanto en su canto 
Por el amor y su poder de destruir 




4. El Sombrerón 



26 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 

F C 



Dm 



E 



-"•■a No'^que^ ri- a 



~m — 

La her- mo- sa Ce- li- na no co- mi-"* a 



* — * m 

a tra-ba- 

Dm 



1 



jar y no que- n- a a ma- ne- cer Y sus po-bres pa- pas se preo-cu- pa-"* ban 



Dm 



Estribillo: 



Dm 



Del"* he^ chi- zo que la trans-for- mó a- si. El Som- bre- rón, es 

F 



1^ 



J> U J 

es '*lnal- di 



^co- que- tón. El Som- bre- rón. 

Cm' ' 



ción, El 



1. 



Gm'' 



Dm 



m 



Som- bre- rón. 



J 1. hay que guar- dar a las hi- jas de su 

1 2 la que es- cu- cha su gui- 

Dm ' 



can- ci- ón. El ta- rra mué- re de pa- si- ón-. 
bI- E' Am Dm b'' 



P 



Aun- que tra- te de pro- te-ger a su hi- ja, pa- pá, Y ma- má, aun- que la 
£7 Am E' 



m 



quie- res en-' ce- rrar 
A 



No pue-des e- vi- tar la 

Gm C Gm 



Vie- ne el 



luz- - déla lu- - na 
C ^. 



n n in 



mor Con to- do su do- 

C 



lor, A con- fan- dir el co- ra- zón, el Som- bre- rón - 



5. La camisa de Margarita Pareja 

Una leyenda del Perú 



Recientemente una alumna americana estaba visitando a su abuela en 
la linda ciudad de Lima, Perú. Pasaron una tarde agradable en los comercios 
más elegantes del centro de la ciudad y la joven se dió cuenta que varias 
veces su abuela, al mirar los precios en las etiquetas de la ropa, exclamó: 
— ¡Es más cara que la camisa de Margarita Pareja! 

Finalmente la joven le preguntó qué significaba esta expresión. La 
abuela contestó que era un dicho muy conocido en Lima, y usado 
especialmente por las personas mayores de edad cuando querían criticar los 
precios altos. Añadió que le parecía que el dicho tenía su origen en la época 
colonial de Lima. 

— Pero ¿quién era Margarita Pareja? — la muchacha quiso saber. 
Así la abuela le contó la linda historia de Margarita Pareja y su amor, Luis. 

En el año 1765, Don Raimundo Pareja, el colector general del puerto 
de Callao, era uno de los hombres de negocio más prósperos de Lima. Vivía 
en un palacio con su esposa Doña Carmela y su única hija, Margarita. A los 
dieciocho años, Margarita era la belleza de la ciudad. La invitaban a todas 
las fiestas y bailes más importantes y ella siempre bailaba y conversaba con 
mucho aplomo y gracia. Era muy bonita. Tenía el pelo negro rizado 
adornado con moños de colores, los ojos negros vivaces y la cintura esbelta. 
Era muy mimada por sus padres, los cuales le daban todo lo que eUa 
deseaba. Tenía tres guardarropas llenos de vestidos y zapatos para cada 
ocasión. Durante sus años de estudiante, Margarita Pareja había asistido a 
los mejores colegios que existían en el Perú, así como también había pasado 
dos años en París estudiando francés. Además de ser rica y bella, Margarita 
era muy intehgente. Le encantaba leer y escribir poesía, y también discutir 
de política y los nuevos descubrimientos científicos del día. Detrás de su 
conducta dulce y alegre únicamente sus padres sabían que ella también tenía 
una voluntad obstinada e incansable. 

En otro barrio de la gran ciudad vivía un joven pobre y guapo que se 
Uamaba Luis Alcázar. Era huérfano y vivía en un sólo cuarto de una casa de 
huéspedes. Luis nunca asistía ni a fiestas ni a bailes, y no tenía interés en 
las mujeres. Lo que le interesaba y le importaba mucho era su trabajo de 




28 



29 



oficinista en una compañía grande de importaciones. Luis había sido muy 
estudioso durante sus años escolares, y aunque ahora trabajaba en la posición 
más baja de la compañía, por medio de su esfuerzo esperaba avanzar 
rápidamente. Probablemente esto sucedería, porque aunque Luis no tenía 
padres, sí tenía un tío, Don Honorato, el señor más rico de Lima, quien era 
el dueño de esa compañía de importaciones. El miraba el progreso de su 
sobrino con interés y escondido orgullo: quería que Luis avanzara en la 
compañía por sus propios méritos e inteligencia, no a causa de la relación 
familiar con el jefe. 

Cada año el 30 de agosto era un día festivo en Lima, todos los 
ciudadanos participaban en una procesión para honrar a Santa Rosa, la 
Santa Patrona de la ciudad. Todas las fábricas, oficinas, escuelas y tiendas 
estaban cerradas ese día y la gente caminaba alrededor de la Plaza de Armas 
en el centro. Los ricos y los pobres juntos llevaban su ropa más alegre y 
paseaban, cantaban y exponían estatuas y cuadros religiosos. Los 
vendedores despachaban jugos, frutas, nueces y elotes, y los niños se ponían 
máscaras y ondeaban banderas pequeñas. 

Margarita Pareja asistía a la procesión montada en un caballo blanco 
adornado con moños azules. Ella saludaba a todos con gracia, de acuerdo a 
su posición elevada en la sociedad. Luis estaba parado entre la 
muchedumbre, gozando de un día sin trabajo, y la vio acercarse. Cuando la 
muchacha paseaba frente a él, ella por casuadidad lo miró. Sus miradas se 
cruzaron, sus ojos se clavaron, y en un sólo instante sus almas se fimdieron 
y se enamoraron profundamente. Luis siguió la procesión corriendo y al 
final cuando Margarita se bajó del caballo, la tomó en sus brazos y la besó. 

Durante los meses siguientes, a Luis le resultó difícil concentrarse en 
su trabajo. Cada tarde que podía, la pasaba con Margarita en su patio. 
Descubrieron que a pesar de la riqueza de ella y la pobreza de él, tenían 
mucho en común; compartían sus perspectivas, sus metas, sus creencias, y 
sobre todo, un amor apasionado. Mientras conversaban sobre libros 
interesantes, invenciones nuevas o culturas exóticas, sus ojos declaraban: 
"Te quiero." 

Cuatro meses después decidieron casarse. Luis, respetuosamente, le 
pidió a Don Raimundo la mano de su hija. El padre se horrorizó con la 
sugerencia de que ese muchacho humilde friera su yerno, y se lo negó 
firmemente. Luis se fríe de la casa deprimido y desfrozado. 

Don Raimundo lo miró alejarse. Estaba encolerizado. Buscó a su 
esposa y a su hija y las encontró en el jardín. 



30 



— ¡Ese pobretón! — gritó — ¡Puedes escoger a cualquier galán de la 
ciudad - y quieres casarte con ese pobre insignificante! ¡No lo permitiré! 

Se escucharon sus gritos enfurecidos por toda la calle. Los 

vecinos comenzaron a chismear y a los pocos días la historia alcanzó los 
oídos de Don Honorato, el tío de Luis. Él se puso aún más fiirioso y gritó 
— ¡Ese don Raimundo! ¿Cómo se atreve a insultar a mi sobrino de tal 
manera? ¡Luis es el mejor hombre joven en toda la ciudad de Lima! 

Margarita estaba desconsolada. Lloraba, gritaba y arrancaba el pelo. 
Amenazaba con hacerse monja. Pero don Raimundo rehusaba cambiar su 
decisión. Doña Ana sentía compasión por su hija, se acordaba de la 
intensidad del amor, y rogaba a su esposo que reconsiderara, pero él reiteraba 
su decisión. Margarita resolvió quedarse en su cama y rehusó comer o 
beber. Se puso delgada y pálida, y su cuerpo se debilitó. 

Cuando don Raimundo temía que se iba a morir, se ablandó y dijo 
— Sí lo quieres tanto me supongo que tengo que dar mi bendición a esa boda. 

Luego él trató de hablar con Don Honorato, pero éste se sentía aún 
muy ofendido con el tratamiento humillante que había sufiido su sobrino. 

— Yo consiento esa boda pero con una condición — dijo el tío — ni 
ahora ni nunca puede regalarle ni un real a su hija. Margarita tendrá que 
formar su hogar con Luis con la ropa que lleva puesta, y nada más. 

Don Raimundo estuvo enojado pero se puso a pensar en los deseos de 
su hija. — Está bien — consintió sin alegría y con un apretón de manos 
prometió — Juro no dar a mi hija más que la camisa de novia. 

Llegó el mes de mayo y toda la ciudad celebró la gran boda de 
Margarita y Luis. ¡Qué resplandeciente lucía la novia en su traje de boda! 
Don Raimundo y Don Honorato olvidaron sus desacuerdos y miraron 
orgullosamente a la feliz pareja. 

Don Raimundo también cumplió con su juramento: ni en vida ni en 
muerte dio a su hija nada más. 

¡Pero qué camisa de boda era! El bordado que adornaba la camisa era 
de oro y plata, los botones de perlas, y el cordón que ajustaba el cuello era 
una cadena de diamantes. ¡La camisa de boda valía una fortuna! 
Luis y Margarita gozaron de un matrimonio feliz y próspero, y tuvieron 
muchos hijos y nietos. Se supone que la lujosa camisa de novia todavía 
pertenence a los descendientes de la familia Alcázar, porque nadie ha vuelto 
a verla desde aquel día de la boda - y jamás se ha visto otra semejante. 

Por eso - aún dos siglos después - cuando un limeño habla de algo 
caro, muchas veces dice: — ¡Es más caro que la camisa de Margarita Pareja! 



31 



□ 



tllU 



□ ■ 



É 



5. La camisa de Margarita Pareja 

Words and music by Patti Lozano 



Ella tenía un montón de vestidos 

Y de sus dedos brillaban anillos 
De - esmeraldas y de perlas 
Él sólo tenia un par de zapatos 
Dos pantalones - ambos baratos 

Y - un sólo cinturón viejo 



Siempre me cuentan 



Y siempre dicen 



Estribillo: De repente en el camino quizás fue el destino 

Los dos se descubrieron y sus almas fundieron 

En un sólo instante de allí en adelante 

Su amor les traería compasión y alegría 



2. Ella estudiaba el francés en París 
Y viajaba a cada país 

De - norte y sudaméríca Siempre me cuentan - 
El trabajaba con resolución 
Día tras día en su pobre rincón 

En - la linda ciudad de Lima Y siempre dicen - 



Estribillo 



3. "¡No seas tonta, por favor, Margarita! 
¡Olvida a Luis - la pasión se te quita 
rá!" aconsejaban sus papás 
"Ella es bella, es verdad, mi sobrino, 
¡Pero ella es rica, y tú - campesino - 
Y - por eso no serán felices!" 

Estribillo 



Siempre me cuentan 



Y siempre dicen - 



4. Los dos se casaron - fiie una boda con misa 
La novia llevaba una linda camisa 
Con - hilos de oro y de plata Y ahora digo 
Pasaron los años - la camisa ya es mía 
Un lindo recuerdo de mi familia 
De - de Margarita y Luis - misabuelitos 

Estribillo 




5. La camisa de Margarita Pareja 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 

D Bm 




E-lla te^'m'-'Tunmon-tón de ves-ti- dos Y de sus^de^dos bri- lia- ban a- ni- líos 
FÍm G A A' 




de 
D 



es-me-ral-das y de per- las 

3m D 



Siem-premé cuen-tan Él 
Bm 



so- lo te-~'m-"*'a un par de za- pa- tos Dos pan- ta- lo^'nes,'*' Am- bos ba- ra- tos. 



Am- bos ba- ra- tos, 
A A' 



Estribillo Y) 



un só- lo cin- tu- rón vi- e- jo Ysiem-pre di-cen,De re- 

FÜ Bm Bm/A G 



y i ' r jr / 'r r r r 

mi- - - no, Qui- zas fue el des- ti- - - no. L( 



pen- te en el ca- mi- - - no. Qui- zás 
D Em D 



^P' ^ ^ r r J ^ i f r r r 'rlf 

dos se des- cu- brie - ron Y sus al- rnas fiin- di- - e- - - 
D 



ron, En 



Bm Bm/A 



p f }• 'I' r i u 

en a- de- lan - te su a- 



un só-lo in- stan - te, De a- 
D Em D 



li en 



Asus" r\ Al 



Descant (durante el estribillo) 
D 



Bm Lra/A 





























el 



Em 



Asus" A'' 



i 



Mar- ga- 



ri- ta Pa- re- 



6. La profecía de la gitana 

Una leyenda de España 



Cuando uno viaja por España, en todas partes se nota la mezcla de las 
culturas de los moros y de los cristianos. Su influencia se ve en la 
arquitectura, en la música folklórica y en las artesanías. Los moros de 
Africa invadieron la península Ibérica - la tierra que hoy se llama España - 
en el año 711, y gobernaron durante más de siete siglos. El sur y el centro 
del país prosperaron bajo la autoridad de los moros, pero en el norte poco 
a poco se formaron reinos cristianos que se resistieron a los moros. Sobre 
todo en el reino cristiano de Asturias, en el noroeste de la península, habían 
muchas batallas contra los moros. Esta misma región luego se convertiría en 
el lugar de nacimiento de la libertad española. 

Muchas leyendas han sobrevivido los siglos de conflictos entre las dos 
culturas en Asturias. Esta historia nos cuenta acerca del príncipe moro Abd 
al-Aziz, y cómo se salvó de los soldados del poderoso y famoso Don Pelayo, 
un noble cristiano que vivía en lo que aún hoy es la provincia de Asturias. 

La batalla duró dos días. Los soldados del joven príncipe Abd al- 
Aziz habían luchado con valor, pero el ejército de Don Pelayo los excedió en 
número y en pasión por su causa, y los vencieron. Todos los soldados 
moros fueron matados, o encadenados y puestos en prisión por mandato del 
noble Don Pelayo. Sólo el príncipe y su criado habían escapado. Al 
mediodía habían huido a pie de las sangrientas tierras de Don Pelayo. Al 
principio había sido fácil cruzar rápido los campos de trigo en el valle, pero 
luego era más difícü subir las colinas pedregosas. Los dos hombres estaban 
fatigados y desmoralizados. 

Después de muchas horas alcanzaron im arroyo y el criado supHcó 
— Vamos a paramos aquí un rato para descansar y tomar agua. Tengo tanta 
hambre y sed que ya no puedo seguir. 

— ^No — dijo el príncipe — ^Puedes beber del arroyo pero no podemos 
descansar aquí. Estoy seguro que Don Pelayo ha descubierto nuestro escape 
y que ya habrá mandado a sus soldados a capturamos. 

— ¿Qué piensa hacer usted? — preguntó el criado. 

— Quiero llegar a esas montañas antes del anochecer. Allí hay un 
puebHto donde podemos escondemos. Necesitamos dormir y descansar para 




34 



35 



recuperar nuestras fuerzas y poder caminar hacia Córdoba mañana temprano. 

Los dos volvieron a caminar, pero la noche llegó antes de que 
llegaran al pueblo. Habían llegado a una zona rocosa donde era peligroso 
andar en la oscuridad porque las rocas eran desiguales y además, con un 
paso en falso, podrían resbalar de un acantilado y caer a la muerte. Los dos 
se pusieron a buscar un refugio para pasar la noche. 

Finalmente el criado vio una cueva amplia y le dijo al príncipe: — Esa 
cueva parece ser grande y estar vacía. Nos protegerá del viento y podremos 
dormir sin que nadie nos descubra. ¿Qué piensa usted? 

Abd al-Aziz caminó hacia la cueva y se paró frente a la entrada con 
los brazos cruzados y una expresión meditabunda. Luego se sonrió y dijo 
con tranquilidad — Sí, estoy contento con esta cueva. Aquí estaremos 
seguros. Dormiremos en paz porque Alá nos protegerá. 

— Ojalá que yo tuviera la misma confianza que usted — dijo el criado 
— ¿Puedo preguntarle por qué se siente tan seguro? 

— Sí, mira en la parte de arriba de la entrada — dijo el príncipe — ¿qué 
ves allí? 

— Nada más que una pequeña araña — contestó el criado. 

— Sí, y esa pequeña araña es la razón por la cual ya no temo a la 
noche o a la cueva — dijo el príncipe — vamos a entrar, nos acomodamos, 
y luego te explicaré todo. 

Así los dos entraron a la cueva y recostaron sus cuerpos agotados en 
la tierra suave y fresca. 

Abd al-Aziz empezó a hablar en la oscuridad. — ¿Te acuerdas cuando 
hace seis meses fuimos al festival en Granada? 

Sí — contestó el criado — usted se quedó festejando hasta la 
madrugada en esas cuevas de las afueras de la ciudad. 

Sí, me divertí bastante — recordó el príncipe — pero ¿sabes que en 
esas cuevas viven los gitanos? Pues, tenía curiosidad y esa noche visité a 
una gitana para que me dijera mi fortuna. Yo esperaba que me dijera algo del 
amor o de las riquezas - pero ¿sabes lo que me dijo? 

El criado no dijo nada, sin embargo, el príncipe siguió de todos modos 
con su narrativa. 

— Me acuerdo perfectamente de las frases que me dijo. Aunque me 
pareció muy extraño, dijo: 'Te recomiendo que siempre cuides a las arañas. 
Te aconsejo que siempre las respetes y las protejas. Nunca olvides mis 
palabras.' 

— Pues, yo comencé a reírme— admitió el príncipe — pero esa gitana 



36 



se puso muy seria y me dijo: "Si valorizas la vida, pondrás atención a mis 
consejos - porque algún día en tu futuro, una araña pueda salvarte la vida." 

— ¿Qué piensas de eso? — le preguntó al sirviente, pero no hubo 
respuesta porque el hombre fatigado se había dormido durante la narración. 
Entonces Abd al- Aziz cerró los ojos y durmió profimdamente sin soñar. Nada 
lo molestó hasta la mañana, cuando su criado lo despertó moviéndole 
insistentemente su hombro. 

— ^No diga nada, por favor — suspiró el criado — pero escuche. 

Los dos hombres oían el ruido de pezuñas fixera de la cueva y una voz 
potente gritando — ¡Aquí! ¡Busquen en esta cueva! 

— ^No, es una pérdida de tiempo — contestó otra voz — nadie ha 
entrado allí en muchos días. 

— Entonces, ¿qué hacemos? — dijo una voz joven. 

El príncipe y el criado escucharon desde atrás de ima roca que estaba 
al fondo de la cueva, sin mover un músculo, casi sin respirar. 

— Pues, hay un pueblo cercano. Apuesto que es donde están 
escondiéndose. Iremos allí ahora para continuar nuestra búsqueda — dijo la 
primera voz. 

— Pero... ¿y si no están en el pueblo? — preguntó la voz joven. 

— Entonces tendremos que volver a Don Pelayo. Tendremos que 
admitir que el príncipe moro y su criado se escaparon - ¡y Dios nos cuide de 
su enojo! 

Luego las voces y el ruido de las pezuñas se apagaron mientras los 
soldados de Don Pelayo galopaban hacia el pueblo en las montañas. 

— ¡Gracias a Alá! — exclamó el príncipe — ^Nos quedaremos aquí 
hasta la tarde y luego podremos pasar el pueblo, y llegar hasta Córdoba sin 
preocupamos. 

— ¿Por qué no nos buscaron en la cueva? — se maravilló el criado. 

Los dos moros salieron de su escondite detrás de la roca y se 
acercaron a la entrada soleada de la cueva. 

— I Es un milagro! — exclamó el criado, arrodillándose y levantando 
sus manos como agradecimiento. 

— No... es la araña de la profecía de la gitana — dijo el príncipe. 
Durante la noche la pequeña araña había construido su telaraña; una delicada 
cortina de hilos platinados que ahora cubría completamente la entrada de la 
cueva. 



tllL rro. 







6. El canto de la gitana 

Words and music by Patti Lozano 



Pasa por las cortinas a la oscuridad de mi lugar 
Siéntate y pregúntame de tu futuro y de la verdad 
Escucha bien mis sugerencias con mi voz te salvaré 
Mentiras, bromas, realidades mi secreto - sólo lo sé 

Estribillo: Soy gitana misteriosa, vagabunda mundial 
Mi mirada es poderosa y mi voz universal 

2. Sugiero que siempre trates las arañas con afección 
Aviso que le des limosna a la vieja en un rincón 
Aconsejo que no te cases con tu amor el mes de mayo 
Recomiendo que no viajes a las montañas a caballo 

Estribillo 



3. Vienen de las montañas y de valles para consultarme 
Los ricos de sus mansiones y los pobres para rogarme 
Los cristianos, los moros, los príncipes, los sirvientes 
Los viejos y amargados, los jóvenes e inocentes 



Estribillo 



38 




Words and music by Patti Lozano 
C 



Am 



Em 



Pa- sa por las cor- ti- nas a la os- cu-ri- dad de mi lu- gar 



Am 



Em 



0. ^ ^ ^ ' é 



Sién- ta- te y pre- gún-ta- me de tu fu- tu-ro y - de lavar- dad 
Am G F G 



Es- 









































LI3 J 


^ — • • • 


• 


• 


^ 


1 0- 




i; 






1 











cu- cha bien mis su- ge- ren- cias Con mi voz- 

Am G F 



¿Men- 







^ — _ 




— J 












































l_biV 

ti- ra; 


, bro- mas o re- 


-é 

a- 




• 

ü- 


da 


J 

-des? 


— M 

Mj 




s 


e- 


1 

ere 


-to 


m 

só 


LJ 

-lo 


1 

lo 





o 

se 





• 

- So 


— 

y gi 







— 



ta- na mis- te- ri- o - sa. Va- ga- bun- da mun- dial 
F b'' E a 



Mi mi- 



n_ ni vf>r_ 



ra- da es po- de- ro^ 



* 

Y mi voz 



u- ni ver- "^sal Soy gi- 



7. Caipora, el Padremonte 

Una leyenda de Brasil 



En nuestro mundo hay muchos que respetan la belleza de la selva 
tropical, y entienden la importancia de cada árbol y animal. También existen 
aquéllos que quieren, a cualquier precio, sacar ventajas de sus fuentes 
naturales. En Brasil, quienes aman la selva tropical hablan con respeto 
acerca de Caipora, el Padremonte. 

Caipora es un poder omnipotente que gobierna la selva, cuida de sus 
habitantes y castiga a aquéllos que amenazan sus tesoros naturales . Nadie 
ha visto a Caipora, así que, en reaüdad, no se sabe cómo es, pero hay varias 
leyendas que tratan acerca de su presencia en el bosque. En ésta vamos a 
conocer entonces a dos jóvenes trabajadores que tienen un encuentro fatídico 
con Caipora, el Padremonte. 

Dos leñadores jóvenes iban juntos cada mañana a trabajar en el monte 
cerca del pueblo donde vivían con sus esposas e hijos. 

Toño, seis meses mayor que su compañero, Chico, nunca dejaba de 
maravillarse de la selva cada vez que iba al monte. Mientras caminaba 
admiraba la delicadeza de las flores tropicales que crecían entre las raíces 
macizas de los árboles. Miraba con placer a las formas graciosas de las 
enredaderas gruesas colgando desde las ramas. Trataba de no estorbar las 
bandadas de flamingos parados en los charcos de agua salobre. Le encantaba 
ver las innumerables mariposas de colores brillantes y escuchar los monos y 
guacamayas regañándose indignadamente, arriba en el colchón de hojas 
verdes. 

Su compadre Chico no observaba nada de la naturaleza. Caminaba al 
lado de Toño siempre hablando en voz alta. No miraba en el sendero que 
seguían, y así siempre pisaba a los insectos que se movían en las hojas 
caídas y muchas veces tumbaba los nidos de animales pequeños. Se divertía 
tirando piedras a los monos en las ramas, para poder escuchar sus gritos 
cómicos de dolor cuando eran heridos. A Chico no le gustaba ser leñador; 
se creía destinado a poseer riquezas y fama, y siempre hablaba de sus planes 
de futuro. 

El trabajo de los dos era cortar leña, ponerla en su mochila, y después 
llevarla a sus casas. Allí quemaban la leña para hacer carbón el cual luego 




40 



41 



venderían en el pueblo. 

Los dos leñadores escogían su lugar en el monte con mucho cuidado. 
Toño nunca perjudicaba el bosque; buscaba árboles con ramas bajas que 
podía cortar sin hacer daño. Nunca cortaba demasiadas ramas de un sólo 
árbol, y jamás cortaba los troncos porque no quería destrozar las casas de los 
animales que podrían vivir allí. La leña de Toño no era de calidad muy 
buena y por eso era pobre, pero estaba muy contento con su vida. Cuando 
Toño descansaba, se sentaba a la sombra de un árbol y tocaba su pipa, una 
flauta esculpida en madera liviana. 

Chico, en cambio, buscaba los árboles más majestuosos y con su 
machete los cortaba de tronco. No le importaba qué animal viviera en sus 
ramas, o ni siquiera si el árbol hubiera permanecido allí durante cien años - 
porque Chico solamente quería leña de la mejor calidad. Chico descansaba 
de su trabajo con su rifle; practicaba su puntería tratando de matar tucanes, 
ocelotes, y otros animalitos. 

Un día Chico no fue al monte porque quiso quedarse en el pueblo con 
los amigos. Toño se fue solo y entró al bosque con gran placer porque la 
verdad era que no disfrutaba la compañía de Chico. Sin embargo pronto 
percibió que ese día en el bosque todo era diferente... peculiar... expectante... 
Los pájaros no cantaban y los monos se sentaban en las ramas mirando sin 
hacer ruido. Toño vio a los ojos de otros animales mirando a hurtadillas 
desde los heléchos. El aire no se movía: parecía espeso, sin embargo los 
árboles parecían estremecerse con anticipación. Toño estaba inquieto y 
temeroso pero no sabía por qué. 

De pronto sintió un viento frío y después una niebla gris cubrió el 
bosque y ya no vió nada más. Escuchaba muchos ruidos salvajes que no 
reconocía. Toño ahora se sentía aterrorizado. Se quedó paralizado, no podía 
trabajar ni regresar al pueblo. Siempre había atesorado el bosque pero ahora 
pensaba que quizás hoy se moriría allí. 

Se arrodilló en las hierbas y cerró los ojos para no ver la oscuridad 
espantosa. Al poco rato olía un aroma dulce y agradable como a pasto 
recién cortado. De pronto la tierra empezó a agitarse con pasos pesados; 
Toño abrió los ojos con terror y vio que de las tinieblas salía una aparición 
monstruosa. Un viento suave murmuraba el nombre "Cai...po...rá" y Toño 
se dió cuenta que era el legendario Caipora, el Padremonte. 

Toño se levantó y con la cabeza inclinada, se paró delante del enorme 
cuerpo. Se sentía paralizado por el miedo y temía el momento en que los 
colmillos afilados penetraran en su cuello. Pero eso no sucedió. 



42 

— ¡Mírame, hombre! — mandó el Caipora. 

Lentamente Toño miró desde las patas hasta la cabeza del ser 
espantoso. Era enorme, y su piel tenía el color y la textura de las hierbas. 
Sus uñas eran ásperas, desiguales como la corteza del pino. Tenía la cabeza 
de lobo con los colmillos blancos, y los ojos brillantes y amarillos como los 
del jaguar. La característica que más asustaba era que tenía los pies 
invertidos, ¡con los dedos hacia atrás! 

Caipora se fijó en la figura del hombre desdichado, y gritó muy fuerte. 
Toño vio con asombro que de la grotesca boca abierta salían mariposas 
anaranjadas y semillas pequeñas, que al caer en la tierra inmediatamente 
crecían y florecían, convirtiéndose en hermosas flores. 

— ¡Toca tu pipa, hombre! — mandó Caipora. 

— ¡Sí! — balbuceó Toño y rápidamente la sacó de su bolsa y tocó una 
melodía hermosa. 

Caipora cerró sus ojos amarillos para escuchar, mientras de su cuerpo 
desprendía el aroma de las hierbas fi-escas. Todo el bosque parecía quedarse 
quieto para gozar las notas de la pipa del hombre. 

— ¿Me das tu pipa? — pidió Caipora cuando la canción se acabó. 

— Sí... con placer — contestó Toño humildemente, ofi^eciéndosela con 
la mano todavía temblando. 

El Padremonte la tomó en su pata inmensa y se fijó en el leñador una 
vez más, luego se dio vuelta abruptamente, y otra vez desapareció entre las 
tinieblas. 

Toño se arrodilló y suspiró con alivio. Permaneció inmóvil por 
mucho rato, pero poco a poco se dio cuenta que la niebla se había levantado 
y los ruidos de la selva habían regresado a los de un día regular. 

— Quizás file un sueño — pensó Toño — ¡tengo que trabajar mucho 
para olvidar esta experiencia! 

Empezó a cortar las ramas más bajas con mucho cuidado y al 
anochecer volvió a su casa con su mochila llena de leña como siempre. 

Después de la cena empezó a quemar la leña como de costumbre, pero 
notó con sorpresa que esa madera produjo el mejor carbón que había hecho 
en su vida. A la mañana siguiente llevó el carbón al pueblo y sus clientes se 
maravillaron de su buena calidad. Ganó mucho dinero con ese carbón. 

De allí en adelante, no importaba de dónde Toño cortara la leña, el 
carbón siempre salía de una calidad superior. Entraba a su querido bosque 
con alegría y sin temor de un nuevo encuentro con Caipora. A veces 
pensaba escuchar las notas de su flauta soplando en las brísas. En pocos 



43 



meses el carbón de Toño se hizo muy reconocido; él se convirtió en una 
persona muy rica y tenía mucho tiempo para descansar, jugar con sus hijos 
y gozar de la vida. 

Chico siguió la rutina monótona de caminar al bosque todos las 
mañanas. Sentía mucha envidia en las tardes cuando pasaba por la casa de 
Toño, tambaleando por el peso de la leña en su mochila, y éste lo saludaba 
desde su porche. 

— ¿Cómo es posible que mi compadre, que casi no trabaja, se haya 
vuelto tan rico, mientras yo, que corto tantos árboles diariamente, todavía 
soy pobre? — se preguntó. 

Finalmente un día Chico no pudo contener la curiosidad y dijo a su 
compadre — Por favor, dime el secreto de tu buena fortuna. 

Toño todavía se maravillaba de su encuentro con Caipora y muchas 
veces dudaba que en realidad hubiera vivido esa experiencia; por eso se 
sentía avergonzado de contar demasiados detalles. 

— Pues, me supongo que mi fortuna cambió el día que tú no fuiste a 
trabajar y me encontré con Caipora, el Padremonte. 

— ¡Te encontraste con Caipora - el Monstruo de la Selva Tropical! — 
exclamó Chico — ¿Qué te hizo? 

— Pues, tuve mucho miedo — admitió Toño — pero no me hizo nada. 
Pidió mi pipa y yo se la di - es todo. 

Chico estaba enloquecido de envidia. — ¿Una pipa - es todo? — pensó 
él — pues, yo fumo todo el tiempo... tengo muchas pipas en rrü casa. Yo 
escogeré una de las mejores para regalar a Caipora - ¡y pronto me hará tan 
rico como a Toño! 

La mañana siguiente Chico entró al bosque, se paró entre los árboles 
y gritó con voz malhumorada — ¡Caipora! ¿Dónde estás? ¡Caipora! ¡Soy 
Chico... un leñador! ¡Muéstrate aquí! 

De repente el sol en el bosque brilló con luz insoportable y con un 
grito terrible salió Caipora. El aire se llenó con el olor a hojas podridas. 

— ¡Mírame, hombre!— mandó Caipora. 

Chico sintió un temor repentino. 

— Mira, Caipora, ¿puedes darme buen carbón? Te traje mi pipa. 
Tómala. 

Con mano temblorosa le ofreció su pipa favorita - llena de tabaco, 
lista para fumar. 

Caipora gritó furioso, y de su boca abierta salieron avispas y víboras, 
y con un golpe de su pata destrozó la pipa del hombre. 



44 



— ¡Tú destrozas mi bosque! ¡Tú matas mis árboles y mis animales! 
¡Tú, leñador miserable, nmica más volverás a dañar mi bosque! — gritó 
Caipora enfurecido. 

El viento sopló, y torbellinos de hojas escondieron completamente la 
figura del Protector del Bosque y del leñador desgraciado. Cuando el viento 
se calmó y las hojas se asentaron en la tierra, ambos - Caipora y Chico - 
habían desaparecido. Chico no volvió al pueblo esa noche, ni nunca más. 

Por lo general las personas que viven en el pueblo no entran al bosque 
durante la noche, porque la oscuridad total atemoriza, y también porque 
muchos animales se vuelven más agresivos y sin miedo. 

También se habla de la aparición misteriosa que flota incansadamente 
por las noches entre las ramas de los árboles. Es la forma espantosa de un 
hombre agonizante con una pipa quebrada en la boca, y sus pies están 
invertidos, con sus dedos hacia atrás. 



45 



□ 



7. El Caipora 



Words and 



Estribillo: 

En las ramas, el Caipora, 
Amo del bosque y protector 
La omnipotencia de su presencia 
Llena cada árbol, cada flor 
En las hierbas, el Caipora, 
Padremonte y conductor 
Por agua, aire, tierra y sangre 
Juzga su mundo con fervor 



Toño, Toño, Toño trabajaba en el bosque 
Trabajaba en el bosque sin cesar 
Toño respetaba las plantas y animales 
Toño cuidaba las joyas naturales 
Toño no cortaba los troncos tropicales 



Vino el Caipora - Toño lo miró 
Chispas en los ojos - Toño estremeció 
¡Ay! ¡Qué susto! Un rezo balbuceó 
El Caipora le dejó escapar 



Estribillo 

Chico, Chico, Chico trabajaba en el bosque 
Trabajaba en el bosque sin cesar 
Chico sí mataba las plantas y animales 
Chico sí robaba las joyas naturales 
Chico sí cortaba los troncos tropicales 



Vino el Caipora - Chico lo miró 
Chispas en los ojos - Chico sonrió 
¡Ay! ¡Qué sorpresa! Su pipa ofreció 
El Caipora en espanto se cambió 



Estribillo 



7. El Caipora 



46 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 
Dm A'' 



1 

"•mas El Cai- po- 



En las ra- "*mas El Cai- po- "•ra. A- mo del bos-que y pro-tec- tor La om- 
Gm Dm A 



■I'boL'^- da floi 



ni- po-ten- cia ae "•'su pre-sen- cia in- va- de ca- da ár-^ 'bol.'^ca- da flor 
Dm A'' b'' F 



• — • — — 0- 



as hier- "*"bas, El Cai- po- ■*'ra, Pa- dre-mon- te y pro-tec- tor 
Dm E'' A^ Dm 



En las 



Por 



Gm 



^=5 



a- gua, ai- re, ti- e^ 
C F 



1^- — ~ w — m • ~ — # — ^ 

rra y san- gre, Juz- ga su mun-do con fer- vor. 
— C7 



JjjjJjJJ i Jj^ 



* -d-d-d ^ -d-d-d • ^ -d * _ , , 

To-ño To-ñoTo-ño tra-ba- ja- ba en el bos-que Tra- ba ja- ba en el bos-que sin ce- sar. 
D7 Gm C 



J J J jp'j J' 1 ^ i i J ^ ^ r ^ uj J J ^'j i 



To- ño res- pe- ta- ba las plan- tas y a- ni- ma- les, , To- ño cu- i- da- ba las 
F # ^ E? 



d * ' i \ ^ 



* 



jo- yas na- tu- ra- les To-río no cor- ta- ba los tron- eos tro- pi -ca- les 
Al W PQ A'' 



Vi-no el Cai-po-ra To-ño lomi-ró 
G Dm G Dm 



Chis-pas.en los o- jos To-ño es-tre-me- ció 
B^- C D 



■i 



^5 



/Ay! iQué sus- to! Un re- zo bal-bu-ceó- El Cai- po- ra le de- jó es- ca- par 



8. Los Árboles de las Flores Blancas 

Una leyenda de México 



¿Cuál tiene más fuerza: el amor o el odio? Esta antigua leyenda 
mexicana examina esas fuerzas opuestas, y al mismo tiempo explica cómo 
llegó el árbol de magnolia a la Ciudad de México. Es interesante notar que 
los pétalos de las flores blancas de este árbol son tan delicadas que al tocarlas 
se dañan, pero tienen una fragancia hermosa y fuerte que no se desvanece 
con facilidad. 

En el siglo XV los zapotecas festejaron que un joven rey acababa de 
ocupar el trono en la bella ciudad de Juchitán, en la región de México que 
hoy en día se llama Oaxaca. El nuevo rey se llamaba Cosijoeza y era sabio, 
benévolo y valiente. Aunque era un guerrero distinguido, le gustaba 
igualmente gozar de la hermosura de la naturaleza. En su palacio tenía 
jardines extensos con mucha variedad de plantas, ñores y árboles que le 
daban placer, así como bancas de piedra en los cuales le gustaba sentarse y 
desde allí admirar los akededores. En todos sus jardines tenía una cierta 
especie de árbol favorito que valoraba más que a los demás; era alto y daba 
sombra con sus lustrosas hojas verdes, y tenía grandes flores blancas que 
daban una fragancia celestial. Estos árboles solamente se encontraban dentro 
del palacio de Juchitán, pero eran conocidos y codiciados hasta en 
civilizaciones muy lejanas. 

Una tarde llegaron unos emisarios del poderoso rey azteca Ahuitzotl. 
Ahuitzotl y los aztecas eran los enemigos de Cosijoeza y los zapotecas. 
Habían ocurrido muchas batallas sangrientas enfre las dos tribus. Los 
guardias de Cosijoeza, ubicados en las paredes, inmediatemente se pusieron 
alertas temiendo vma pelea. Pero los emisarios habían llegado únicamente 
con el propósito de entregar un mensaje al joven rey zapoteca. 

— Nuestro amo, el rey de los aztecas, Ahuitzotl le manda saludos... 
También le pide que nos dé algunos Arboles de las Flores Blancas para 
plantar en los canales de nuesfra magnífica ciudad, Tenochtitlán. 

Cosijoeza fingió pensar la petición pero la verdad era que odiaba al 
rey azteca, y jamás hubiera querido compartir sus árboles tan preciados con 
los enemigos. 

Después de una pausa dijo — ^No, no es posible. Estos árboles jamás 




48 



49 



saldrán de mi reino. Váyanse ya porque ésta es mi respuesta fmal. 

Los emisarios se marcharon muy sorprendidos y con expresión de 
enojo por el insulto ( "osijoeza se sentó en su jardín para meditar sobre el 
asunto. Sabía que su enemigo Ahuitzotl ahora mandaría a^us guerreros 
aztecas a luchar contra los zapotecas y tratarían de tomar Los Arboles de las 
Flores Blancas a la fuerza. Se sintió tríste; no quería una batalla sangrienta 
en su reino, y no quería causar la muerte sin sentido de cualquier zapoteca. 

—Pues — pensó el joven rey — la vida nunca es simple. Más vale que 
nos preparemos. 

Luego reunió a sus jefes guerreros y Ies advirtió que algún día cercano 
los aztecas iban a atacar a Juchitán. 

— Tenemos que preparamos para el ataque — dijo Cosijoeza — todos 
ustedes saben que los aztecas son numerosos y poderosos, y que sus dioses 
son sanguinarios y crueles, además están muy enojados porque yo los insulté. 
Ustedes, mis guerreros valientes, tendrán que luchar con todo su poder para 
salvar sus vidas y las de las familias del reino. Preparen las paredes de 
protección, los sótanos de escondite y las flechas envenenadas. 

Los guerreros comunicaron las predicciones angustiantes y las órdenes 
explícitas de Cosijoeza a través de Juchitán; la gente asustada trabajó mucho 
para prepararse para el ataque tan temido. 

Mientras tanto los emisarios de Ahuitzotl regresaron a Tenochtitlán 
y contaron la respuesta insultante del joven rey zapoteca. Como lo había 
anticipado Cosijoeza, el rey azteca se puso muy enojado. 

— ¡Reuniré mi ejército y destrozaré ese rey insignificante! ¡El corazón 
de ese insolente rey zapoteca será el primer sacrificio de la batalla que 
ofi"eceremos a nuestro dios de la guerra Huitzilopochtii! — gritó. 

Luego se calmó y comenzó a pensar. El rey azteca era muy astuto, 
igual al joven enemigo zapoteca. 

— No — dijo — no, mejor voy a hacerle una trampa. No gastaré la 
sangre de mis guerreros. Todavía puedo sorprender al enemigo... tomaré 
muchos prisioneros, y al mismo tiempo podré llevarme todos Los Arboles 
de las Flores Blancas. 

Entonces llamó a Coyolicatzín, su hija más bella e inteligente. Le 
explicó su plan y la muchacha escuchó atentamente. 

— Hija mía, quiero poseer Los Arboles de las Flores Blancas, y 
conquistar el reino zapoteca a la misma vez. Es necesario que me ayudes. 
En tres días saldrás de Tenochtitlán acompañada por dos criados. El viaje al 
reino zapoteca será largo y difícil. Cuando llegues allí, ñiera de la ciudad. 



50 



te lavarás en el río y luego te pondrás la ropa más hermosa y tus joyas más 
preciosas. ¿Me entiendes? 

— Sí, papá — contestó Coyolicatzín, confundida pero atentamente. 

Ahuitzotl siguió — Luego, sin los criados, buscarás el palacio del rey 
zapoteca. Pasa a través de los portales con decisión, de modo que nadie te 
haga preguntas. Allí encontrarás jardines extensos con Los Arboles de la 
Flores Blancas. Espérate allí. El joven rey ingenuo te encontrará en su 
jardín y deberás hacerlo enamorarse de ti. Tú debes fingir estar enamorada 
de él también. Te casarás con el rey zapoteca y tendrán una gran boda. 

A Coyolicatzín no le gustó esto, pero bajó la cabeza, suspiró y dijo 
— Sí, papá - para usted y para Tenochtitlán. 

— ^No será para siempre — prometió Ahuitzotl — después de la boda 
tu tarea será descubrir, poco a poco, todos los secretos del rey zapoteca. 
Cuando sepas todo, volverás a Tenochtitlán con la excusa de visitar a tu 
tribu. Me dirás todos sus secretos, y luego ¡nuestro ejército marchará a 
Juchitán para destruirlos! Tú, mi princesa, te quedarás en Tenochtitlán, y 
todos te admirarán por tu valentía y destreza. Luego podrás casarte con un 
noble guerrero azteca de tu elección, y nunca más volverás a Juchitán. 

— Yo haré lo mejor que pueda para honrar a usted y a nuestra tribu — 
prometió Coyolicatzín, y se alejó del templo de su padre para comenzar los 
preparativos del viaje. 

Mientras tanto, en Juchitán Cosijoeza estaba inquieto. Tenía el 
presentimiento de que el enemigo iba a atacar pero esto no había sucedido; 
todos los caminos que conducían a su reino se quedaban extrañamente 
quietos. Cada día él se sentaba en una banca de su jardín para descansar, 
pensar y planear estratégias de batalla. 

Cierto día, cuando estaba sentado allí, vio a una joven mujer bella, 
sola, y hermosamente vestida, recostada contra el tronco de uno de Los 
Arboles de las Flores Blancas. 

— ¿Quién eres? — preguntó sorprendido Cosijoeza — ^pareces una 
princesa bajada de un templo en el cielo. 

Ella sonrió, se puso roja y contestó — Vengo de tierras ajenas... estoy 
perdida, y ando en busca de la feücidad. 

Cosijoeza sintió curiosidad por conocer a la misteriosa mujer, y se 
sintió muy atraído por ella también. La invitó a su palacio, y ella, de acuerdo 
con el plan de Ahuitzotl, aceptó la invitación. 

Dentro del palacio zapoteca, Coyolicatzín se fascinó por las 
diferencias entre su propia cultura y la del joven rey. Ella aprendió muchas 



51 



palabras nuevas en el idioma zapoteca, probó numerosas frutas y vegetables 
que eran desconocidas por ella, y aprendió a hacer artesanías y ropa 
característica de la región. Se olvidó de ser misteriosa, en cambio tenía 
muchas preguntas y comentarios . El joven rey dejó a un lado sus 
problemas, y disfrutó de la conversación con la hermosa mujer. En pocos 
días Cosijoeza se había enamorado completamente y pidió casarse con ella. 

— Quiero que seas mi esposa, y además te conviertas en la reina de los 
zapotecas. 

De pronto Coyolicatzín recordó lo prometido a su padre y contestó 
— Es difícil que yo sea tu esposa porque mi padre es el rey azteca, Ahuitzotl. 

Cosijoeza se puso muy enojado. Se dio cuenta del engaño de la 
muchacha y ya no quiso hablar más con ella. Llorando mucho, Coyolicatzín 
volvió a Tenochtitíán y admitió ante su padre que había fallado en su misión. 
Ahuitzotl se sintió disilusionado pero perdonó a su hermosa hija. Resolvió 
buscar otro plan para vencer al arrogante rey zapoteca. 

En Juchitán el rey zapoteca estaba amargamente destrozado por el 
engaño de la joven mujer; ya no le importaba nada. Incluso sus queridos 
Arboles de las Flores Blancas no le daban placer. Sin embargo, después de 
un tiempo, el se dio cuenta que todavía deseaba casarse con Coyolicatzín a 
pesar de su falsedad. 

Luego mandó cinco emisarios zapotecas al rey Ahuitzotl en 
Tenochtitíán, con sus manos cargadas de riquezas - pájaros tropicales, 
floreros magníficos, collares de plata, jarras de miel, y más. 

— Nuestro benévolo rey Cosijoeza le ofi"ece estos regalos de Juchitán 
y respetuosamente pide la mano de la princesa Coyolicatzín — dijo el jefe de 
los emisarios. 

¡Qué alegría sintió Azuitzotl; su plan tenía éxito! Aceptó las riquezas 
con cordialidad, y anunció que la bella Coyolicatzín se casaría con el rey 
zapoteca. La joven volvió a Juchitán muy feliz, y después de tres meses de 
preparativos, todo el reino celebró la boda de la hermosa princesa azteca con 
el querído rey zapoteca. 

Cosijoeza y Coyolicatzín se ponían cada día más contentos y 
enamorados. La gente zapoteca adoraba a la reina bella e inteligente. Toda 
la región prosperaba bajo el reinado del matrímonio feliz. A Cosijoeza le 
gustaba contar todo a su esposa. No le ocultaba ningún secreto del reino, y 
la consultaba para todas las decisiones importantes. En poco tiempo 
Coyoücatzín sabía cómo se reforzaban las paredes del palacio, dónde estaban 
los sótanos de escondite y especialmente cómo preparar el veneno para las 



52 



flechas. También recordaba que su padre en Tenochtitlán esperaba esta 
información cada día más desesperadamente. La joven reina se sentía 
afligida por su dilema; tenía que obedecer a su padre, aunque amaba a su 
esposo con todo el corazón, así como también al pacífico pueblo zapoteca; 
sabía que nunca más sería capaz de traicionarlos. 

— ¿Qué hago? — pensó llorando — ¡soy yo la que está metida en la 
trampa de mi padre! 

Finalmente decidió — Mi esposo es un hombre comprensible y me 
ama. Yo le contaré toda la verdad. 

Esa tarde Coyolicatzín invitó a su esposo al jardín, y se sentaron bajo 
uno de Los Arboles de las Flores Blancas, el mismo árbol donde se habían 
visto por primera vez. Coyolicatzín, temblando y sollozando, confesó toda 
la conspiración junto a su padre, desde su comienzo en Tenochtitlán. 

Cosijoeza escuchó todo, y luego la abrazó y la calmó con palabras 
cariñosas; — Te perdono, esposa mía, has demostrado lealtad a mi reino en 
todas tus acciones y confío plenamente en ti. 

El rey sintió una profima compasión por su joven esposa que durante 
tantos meses había guardado una carga tan pesada en su corazón. — ¿Qué 
puedo hacer para demostrarle mi perdón y mi amor? — pensó el rey mirando 
a las hojas de su árbol tan querido, y de repente supo la solución. 

Al día siguiente Cosijoeza mandó como regalo al rey azteca diez 
grandes Arboles de las Flores Blancas. El amor había conquistado su odio. 
Ahuitzotl, el poderoso rey azteca, y Cosijoeza, el bondadoso rey zapoteca, 
jamás volvieron a pelear. 

Aún hoy se pueden ver Los Arboles de las Flores Blancas - las 
magnolias - en Tenochtitlán, la antigua capital de los aztecas, ahora conocida 
por todo el mundo bajo el nombre de Ciudad de México. 



"[ Jul rm. 



□ 



8. La Magnolia 

Words and music by Patti Lozano 



Melodía aguda: 

Ven, mira la flor 

Hermosa la flor 

Blanca, suave y fina la flor 

Ven, mira la flor 
Hermosa la flor 
Los pétalos de terciopelo 

Frágil es, pero fuerte es 
Su fi-agancia en la memoria 



(2X) 



Melodía grave: 

Siempre se celebran ejércitos fuertes 
Siempre se escriben lindas poesías 
Jactándose las guerras y batallas sangrientas 
Siempre se erigen esculturas altas 
Siempre se componen obras teatrales 
Honrándose a los generales triunfantes 



Pero el mejor - 
Es sólo el amor 



El gran conquistador 
Simplemente es amor 



Y. 



(2X) 



Entre los paises hay competiciones 
Entre los equipos hay exhibiciones 
Mostrándose al mundo sus hazañas invencibles 
Entre las familias hay discusiones 
Entre los vecinos hay altercaciones 
Disputándose las amistades de sus hijos 

Pero el mejor - El gran conquistador 

Es sólo el amor Simplemente es amor (2X) 



Todos: 

Amor siempre 
Amor eternal 
Amor es la fragancia 
La fragancia iiunortal 



8. La Magnolia 



54 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 
Melodía aguda: 



Am 



Am 



Em 



Ven, mi- ra la flor 



Her- mo- sa la flor 

G 



Blan- 
Pé- 



Dm 



ca, 
ta- 



sua- ve y 
los- - de 



fi- na la flor' 
r- p - cío- pe-lo 



Frá- 
C 



es, pe- ro fuer- te es su &a- 



gan- ci- a en la me- mo- 

Melodía grave: c Am C 



n- a. 



C Am C Am 

n n \ Q n P ujjjjj ijjjj.n 



Siem-pre se ce- le-bran e- jer- c¡- tos fuer-tes, Siem-pre se ce- le- bran lin-das po- e- sí- is, 
Em ^ G 



„ Pe- ro el me-ior 

Todos: C 




mor es la fra- gan- cí a La fra- gan- cía in- mor- tal 



El origen del nopal 

Una leyenda de México 




México es una linda tierra de paisajes diferentes: hay montanas 
majestuosas, playas cristalinas, selvas húmedas y ciudades ajetreadas. Pero 
más que todo, cuando uno piensa en un sólo paisaje de México se presenta 
la imagen del cacto en el desierto. El cacto más conocido y querido es el 
nopal, una planta baja y pimzante. Se desarrolla adoptando formas muy 
interesantes, y sobre las hojas crecen frutas que se parecen a peras rojas. 
Es una planta muy útil; se come la hoja como una verdura, y la fruta es ima 
delicadeza. Este nopal, que se encuentra frecuentemente en las artesanías 
mexicanas hoy en día, fue utilizado en el escudo azteca hace quinientos años. 
La leyenda que sigue nos relata el origen del nopal. 

Hace muchos siglos vivían varias tribus de indios en esa tierra que hoy 
se llama México - los mayas, los zapotecas, los toltecas - y muchas más. 
La tribu de los aztecas era nómada; ellos no eran simpáticos con nadie; las 
demás tribus decían que eran "chichimec," que se traduce como "los 
bárbaros" o "hijos de perros," a causa de su crueldad en el combate y el 
sacrificio sangriento de los prisioneros de guerra. 

Cerca del año 800 los aztecas estaban viviendo en siete cuevas cuando 
el dios Huitzilpochtli les dio un mandato misterioso: — Busquen una tierra 
nueva donde luego construirán una gran ciudad. 

— ¿Cómo sabremos si la tierra es buena? — preguntaron los indios. 

— Encontrarán un águila encaramada en un nopal, devorando una 
serpiente. Construirán la ciudad en ese sitio. 

La tribu de aztecas empezó entonces una larga caminata en busca de 
estas señales. Siempre los acompañaba Huitzilopochtli, el dios de la guerra. 
Anduvieron errantes durante muchos siglos buscando el signo especial. 

Finalmente cerca del año 1300 los aztecas llegaron al gran valle de 
México donde vieron el lago Texcoco. El supremo sacerdote reunió la tribu 
y anunció —Este lugar es bueno. Aquí viveremos hasta que nuestros dioses 
nos den la señal que nos muestre dónde construir nuestra ciudad. 

La zona alrededor del lago Texcoco era muy inhóspita; era un 
verdadero pantano lleno de víboras venenosas. Tenían que viajar hasta las 
montañas para traer agua saludable, y la tierra era infecunda para el cultivo. 



57 



Tribus bien establecidas ya rodeaban las montañas, así que los aztecas tenían 
que hacer su comunidad en una isla grande en medio del lago Texcoco. 

Los aztecas eran muy trabajadores, y enseguida se pusieron a 
construir su ciudad. La vida era difícil; tenían que alimentarse con carne de 
víbora y pato, peces y las larvas de los mosquitos que llenaban el aire. Poco 
a poco, año tras año, la ciudad crecía mientras los aztecas esperaban la señal 
que su dios había prometido. 

Huitzilopochtli, el dios más cruel, vivía con los aztecas y exigía los 
sacrificios de corazones humanos. Los aztecas lo adoraban, y a la misma vez 
le tenían mucho miedo. Para satisfacer su necesidad de sangre, los aztecas 
continuamente hacían guerra contra tribus vecinas con el sólo propósito de 
juntar prisioneros destinados al sacrificio. Todo el mundo temía y odiaba a 
los aztecas; mientras su tierra y la ciudad prosperaban, su crueldad y su poder 
también aumentaban. 

Huitzilopochtli tenía una hermana que vivía muy lejos, al norte, en 
una tribu pacífica. La pobre mujer suíría mucho pensando en la pena que 
causaba su hermano. Su hijito se llamaba Cópil: aunque era todavía un niño, 
era inteligente y compasivo, y observaba el sufiimiento de su madre. 

—Cuando yo sea grande — declaró el muchacho — marcharé al sur, 
y haré prisionero a mi tío para que no pueda causar tanto dolor. 

— ^No, hijo — dijo su madre — ^no busques a tu tío jamás. Es poderoso 
y cruel. No podrás vencerlo. 

Cópil veía que su promesa asustó a su madre y no dijo nada más, pero 
durante su juventud la voluntad de detener a su tío salvaje siguió creciendo. 

Pasaron muchos años. Ahora Cópil era un joven hombre valiente, y 
nunca había olvidado su resolución de conquistar a su tío. Había pasado 
años de entrenamiento, y ahora tenía el cuerpo atlético y musculoso, y la 
mente alerta y hsta de un general. Cópil formó un ejército de mil hombres, 
se despidió de su madre y empezó la larga marcha a la ciudad de los aztecas. 

Después de muchas semanas el ejército llegó al bosque que rodeaba 
las afueras de la ciudad. Cópil decidió pasar la noche allí; a la mañana 
siguiente entrarían a la ciudad para capturar al dios Huitzilopochtli. 

Cópil no sabía que los aztecas tenían espías escondidos en el bosque, 
los cuales escucharon las estrategias de sus soldados. Durante la noche 
éstos corrieron a contarle a Huitzilopochth todos los detalles del ataque. 

Huitzilopochtli se puso muy enojado, y su voz resonaba como el 
trueno cuando dio esta orden terrible: — A medianoche mis tres sacerdotes 
irán al bosque y encontrarán a Cópil. Mientras mi sobrino duerme, le 



58 



sacarán el corazón y me lo traerán como ofrenda. 

Los tres sacerdotes partieron en su misión, contentos de obedecer al 
dios sanguinario. Llegaron al bosque y fácilmente encontraron el ejército de 
Cópil. Los soldados estaban tan fatigados de su larga marcha, que ninguno 
se despertó ni sintió la presencia de los cautelosos sacerdotes. Distinguieron 
a Cópil por su cinturón adornado y su collar de plata. Los tres sacerdotes se 
pararon sobre el joven capitán, mirándolo dormir. El sacerdote supremo sacó 
de su cinto la piedra afilada usada específicamente para los sacrificios. Se 
agachó y rápidamente con un sólo golpe, partió el pecho de Cópil, metió la 
mano y sacó el corazón palpitante. Cópil se murió sin saber nada. 

Los tres sacerdotes volvieron a la ciudad y entregaron el corazón a 
Huitzilopochtli. El dios lo tomó con satisfacción pero habló con tristeza. 

— ¡Qué joven ingenuo, mi sobrino! ¿Cómo pensó que podría 
vencerme ami? Ingenuo, pero muy valiente... No quiero que se olviden del 
valor de mi sobrino. Lleven su corazón a la pequeña isla cercana, en el lago; 
entiérrenlo allí entre las rocas y las hierbas. 

Los tres sacerdotes obedicieron las órdenes de Huitzilopochtli. 

A la mañana siguiente ellos volvieron a la isla, y descubrieron que 
durante la noche había crecido una magnífica planta de nopal entre las 
piedras y hierbas, en el mismo lugar donde habían enterrado el corazón. 

— Esta planta ha crecido del corazón de Cópü — dijo el sacerdote 
supremo — La fruta roja nos recordará su valor y el sacrificio de su vida. 

Mientras miraban el nopal, un águüa inmenso se bajaba con gracia y 
posaba en una hoja punzante. Cargaba una serpiente en las garras. En ese 
momento el valle se puso oscuro y hubo un relámpago tremendo. Los tres 
sacerdotes escucharon la voz poderosa de Huitzilopochtli. 

— Ya no viviré con la tribu. Los guiaré desde mi habitación en el 
cielo. Hómenme con los sacrificios de corazones himianos, y durante 
muchos siglos ustedes permanecerán como la tribu más poderosa de la tierra. 

Los tres sacerdotes se arrodillaron, y admiraron el águila y el hermoso 
nopal, la señal que su dios les había prometido hace trecientos años. 

Los aztecas permanecieron en el lago Texcoco, y allí construyeron la 
ciudad más bella y magnífica que su tierra haya conocido. Nombraron su 
ciudad "Tenochtitlán" en honor de Tenoch, el supremo sacerdote. 

Todavía existe una ciudad magnífica y enorme en el mismo lugar; se 
llama la Ciudad de México. El escudo azteca - el águila encaramada en el 
nopal, devorando una sirpiente - se observa todavía en la bandera mexicana. 



9. Plantaremos una flor 




Words and music by Patti Lozano 



Plantaremos una flor en nuestro jardín 
Plantaremos una flor aunque sea chiquitín 
Plantaremos una flor - no importa el color 
Plantaremos una flor chiquitín - ¡chiquitín! 



1 . Escogeremos una rosa - no quiero otra cosa 
Escogeremos una rosa para nuestro jardín 

Plantaremos una flor, celebramos el amor 
Plantaremos una flor chiquitín - ¡chiquitín! 

2. Escogeremos un nopal - lo comeremos al final 
Escogeremos un nopal para nuestro jardín 

3. Escogeremos un clavel porque huele a miel 
Escogeremos un clavel para nuestro jardín 

Versos extras: 

4. Escogeremos un clavelón - pondremos más en el balcón 
Escogeremos un clavelón para nuestro jardín 

5. Escogeremos un rascamoño - florecerá hasta el otoño 
Escogeremos un rascamoño para nuestro jardín 



60 



9. Plantaremos una flor 

E FÍm 



flr\r pn niiPQ- tm mr- H 



tí 



Plan- ta- re- mos u- na flor en núes-"* tro jar- din. Plan- ta- 

E 



■ na flor, aun- que se- airchi-ir ^qui- 



re- mos u- na flor, aun- que se- a"»''chi-"*r -*qui- tin. Plan- ta- 

£7 A _ FS 



— # #- 

Plan- ta- 



re- mos u- na flor, 



No im- por- ta el co- lor, 
E A E 



re- mos u- na flor 
B7 



chi- qui- tin 1 Chi- qui- tin! Es-co- ge- 

















































1 — • 





i 






' 




' — J 


i — J 



















B^ 



m 



tí 



re- mos u- na ro- sa pa- ra nues- tro jar- din, 

E E^ A ^ Fit 



Plan- ta- 



mm 



•0 — # 



re- mos u- na flor. Ce- le- bra- mos el a- mor, 
B'' E A E 



Plan- ta- 



'ft ^ r-i 



re- mos u- na flor chi- qui- tin I Chi- qui- tin! 



^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



10. Las manchas del sapo 

Una leyenda de Argentina 



Las ranas del mundo son exquisitas; hay ranas pequeñas que hacen 
acordar a las joyas, como las de América Central, con ojos rojos brillantes 
y patas anaranjadas; las de la selva tropical de Sudamérica, engañosamente 
inocentes, en su arcoiris de colores, que paralizan y matan con su veneno, y 
por supuesto, las legendarias ranas "toro"de Norteamérica que proyectan un 
sonido rítmico y profundo, creando melodiosas canciones en las tardes de 
verano. A la gente que visita el zoológico le encanta mirar las diferentes y 
exóticas ranas que provienen de alrededor del mundo. 

En cambio, a nadie le interesa ver los sapos del mimdo. Muchos se 
burlan del pobre sapo torpe y gordo, con su piel gruesa y áspera de un café 
aburrido. Algunos tienen miedo del humilde sapo, quizás por la abundancia 
de supersticiones con que se les vincula; que si los tocas, te crecerán 
verrugas... que son utilizados por las brujas en sus encantos malvados - todo 
este desprecio a causa de la fealdad del humilde anfibio. Pero ¿saben qué? 
Ningún sapo pone atención a la indiferencia del mundo. Ellos se sienten 
orgullosos de su piel, porque les recuerda a un antepasado distinguido, el 
sapo que una vez voló hasta el cielo. Durante las noches cáüdas de la 
primavera, cuando el aire húmedo llena con los ritmos y cantos de los sapos 
en los charcos, todavía cuentan la leyenda siguiente - de cómo el sapo llegó 
a tener sus manchas. 

Han pasado muchas generaciones desde que, en una isla lejana, un 
sapo y un cuervo eran muy buenos compañeros. El cuervo admiraba a su 
amigo porque sabía nadar, y el sapo admiraba a su amigo emplumado porque 
sabía volar. El sapo no había explorado mucho el mundo, siempre se había 
quedado cerca del charco donde vivía con sus papás, sus hermanos y una 
multitud de tíos y primos. Frecuentemente recibía la visita del cuervo, el 
cual posaba en una piedra cercana, y con voz ronca y fea hablaba acerca de 
sus viajes espléndidos sobre colinas, pueblos, y campos llenos de flores. El 
sapo escuchaba sus palabras con profimda atención. El también deseaba 
poder ver esas maravillas algún día, pero más que todo ¡quería sentir la 
sensación de volar en el aire! 

Un día el cuervo Uegó al charco, graznando con emoción, y le mostró 




62 



63 



al sapo una invitación que se había enviado a todas las aves de la isla. La 
invitación decía: 



¡Vengan todas las aves a 
La Fiesta en el Cielo! 
¡Gozaremos de una tarde de baile 
Y la celebración de nuestros talentos! 



— ¡Por favor, llévame contigo! — dijo el sapo inmediatemente. 

— Tú no puedes venir conmigo - ¡tú eres solamente un sapo! — se 
burló el cuervo del amigo gordo, y luego se fue a hacer sus preparativos para 
la celebración. 

Según la invitación, cada ave tendría que demostrar un talento especial 
en la fiesta. El cuervo se posó en una rama encima del charco para 
contemplar su talento especial. Tenía una voz muy ronca, así que no podía 
cantar muy bien. No... a lo mejor los ruiseñores y los canarios iban a cantar. 
El cuervo no sabía contar chistes... probablemente los loros y los periquitos 
iban a entretener a los invitados con chistes divertidos. ¡Es cierto que no 
podía bailar! Se suponía que los flamencos y las golondrinas iban a bailar. 
Sin duda las águilas y los cóndores demostrarían la acrobacia aérea. El 
cuervo empezó a ponerse deprimido. Aún los quetzales y los pequeños 
pinzones podrían mostrar su plumaje elegante, pero el cuervo tenía 
únicamente plumas negras aburridas. 

De repente se acordó de su vieja guitarra. La sacó y comenzó a 
practicarla. Le faltaban dos cuerdas, pero por lo menos hacía un ruido 
interesante. El cuervo tocó su instrumento toda la semana y trató de 
recordar las letras de las canciones que su padre le había enseñado cuando 
era un bebé. 

La guitarra no estaba afinada y la voz del cuervo era ronca y fea, pero 
eso no le molestaba: creía que poseer entusiasmo era más importante que 
poseer talento. Los desdichados sapos que vivían abajo en el charco tenían 
que escuchar el concierto del cuervo día y noche hasta que todos sufrían de 
tremendos dolores de cabeza. 

Finalmente llegó el día de la gran fiesta. Por la mañana el cuervo 
pulía la vieja guitarra con hojas secas hasta que bríllara, y preparaba su voz 
haciendo escalas y arpegios. Al mediodía bajó al charco para arreglar su 



64 

plumaje negro con agua. 

— ¡Por favor, llévame contigo!— rogó el sapo a su amigo cuando lo 
vio junto al lago. 

— ^No, no puedes asistir a esta fiesta — dijo el cuervo — no tienes alas, 
no tienes plumas y no eres un ave. Mañana te diré todo. 

El sapo suspiró con gran tristeza y miró hacia el cielo con anhelo. 
El cuervo no le hacía caso y continuaba peinándose con agua del charco que 
llevaba en su pico. El sapo estaba a punto de rogar de rodillas cuando de 
repente vio la guitarra acostada sobre las hierbas silvestres detrás del cuervo, 
y se le ocurrió una idea maravillosa. Sin decir otra palabra se metió dentro 
de la guitarra por el espacio donde faltaban las dos cuerdas, y allí se quedó 
completamente quieto, inmóvil. 

El cuervo terminó de arreglarse y observó su reflejo en el agua. 

— ¡Qué guapo soy! — pensó él, mirándose de todos lados. 

— ¡Adiós, sapito! ¡Ya me voy! — dijo el cuervo. No veía a su amigo, 
pero no tenía tiempo para buscarlo porque no quería llegar tarde a la fiesta. 
Colocó la guitarra entre las garras y se fue volando, y tanto era su 
entusiasmo y emoción que ni siquiera se daba cuenta del peso adicional de 
la guitarra que cargaba. 

El sapo, escondido dentro del instrumento, estaba jubiloso de conocer 
la sensación incomparable de volar. Poco tiempo después llegaron a la fiesta 
en el cielo. El cuervo dejó su guitarra a la entrada y fue de prisa para ver el 
espectáculo. El sapo permanecía en su lugar escondido y miraba a 
hurtadillas desde el agujero de la guitarra. ¡Qué elegancia! ¡Qué 
hermosura! Todos los pájaros más bellos del mundo estaban allí, hablando, 
riéndose a carcajadas, tomando vino, picoteando semillas. 

Pronto comenzaron las demostraciones de destrezas y talentos 
superiores. Los ruiseñores y los canarios cantaban selecciones de una 
opereta alemana; los flamencos y las golondrinas presentaban baües 
folklóricos españoles; las águilas y los cóndores emocionaban a los invitados 
con sus hazañas de acrobacia aérea, y los pericos y los periquitos contaban 
chistes muy cómicos entre los diferentes actos. 

— Y ahora yo estoy listo para cantar ima balada acompañada por mi 
guitarra — anunció el cuervo orgullosamente. 

El sapo sintió tanto miedo que se puso fiío. — ¿Qué me harán si me 
descubren? — pensó él, con sus piemitas temblando. 

— No, gracias. Señor Cuervo — dijo el jefe, un arrogante pavo real, 
— desgraciadamente no hay tiempo porque ¡el baile comienza! 



65 



Todos aplaudieron con entusiasmo, cuando se presentó una orquesta 
de pelícanos; ellos afinaron sus instrumentos y comenzaron a tocar un tango. 
Todas las aves comenzaron a bailar con frenesí y nadie hizo caso al cuervo 
que gruñía en un rincón. 

El pequeño sapo suspiró aliviado, y volvió a mirar el espectáculo con 
gusto. La música llenaba su corazón con alegría. Todos bailaban al compás 
de la música; las cigüeñas con las guacamayas; los flamencos con los 
tucanes; los canarios con los pinzones; las águilas con las palomas - ¡qué 
fiesta fantástica! 

De repente, sin premeditación, el sapo saltó del agujero de la guitarra y se 
juntó con las aves. Brincaba de una pata a la otra con el ritmo de la música. 
Bailaba con mucha agilidad, entusiasmo y alegría; prímero con un ruiseñor, 
luego con ima cigüeña, luego con im periquito... hasta que ñie la pareja de 
todos. Las aves estaban encantadas con el pequeño bailarín y para el sapo - 
pues, ¡era una noche divina e inolvidable! De vez en cuando pensaba en su 
amigo y se preocupaba por lo enojado que se pondría si lo descubría en el 
baile de las aves; en esos momentos trataba de esconderse de la vista del 
cuervo malhumorado. 

Finalmente el sapo tuvo que descansar de bailar. Se sentó en una silla, 
jadeando y su pequeño corazón palpitando. Todas las aves se juntaron 
alrededor de él y aplaudieron apasionadamente. 

— ¿Cómo aprendiste a bailar tan divino? — preguntó ima gaviota. 

—¿Cómo llegaste a la fiesta si no tienes alas? — preguntó un loro. 

— ¿Tienes hermanos que puedas traer contigo la próxima vez? — 
preguntó im pinzón. 

El sapo no quiso decir nada y se quedó callado. 

— ¿Sabes cantar también? — preguntó una lechuza. 

El pequeño anfibio bailarín no pudo resistir la invitación. ¡Como a 
todos los sapos del mundo, le encantaba cantar! Se levantó y cantó con su 
potente voz una canción antigua de amor y traición. Las aves escuchaban 
con lágrimas en los ojos y cuando las últimas notas se desvanecían, la 
atmósfera festiva se colmó con gritos de ''¡Bravo! ¡BravoP' 

Ese ruido sacó al cuervo de su humor melancólico, y se juntó con las 
aves para ver qué era lo que les entretenía tanto. ¡Qué fastidiado se sintió 
cuando descubrió que el objeto de admiración era su amigo, el sapo! Pero 
¿cómo había llegado a la fiesta? Casi enseguida el cuervo se dio cuenta que 
el sapo debía haberse escondido dentro de su guitarra. Su corazón se llenó 
de resentimiento y quiso la venganza. Se colocó dentro del círculo de aves 



66 

y tomó la mano del sapo asustado. 

— Yo soy quien invitó al Sr. Sapo a nuestra fiesta porque conocía su 
gran talento musical — mintió el cuervo con una gran sonrisa de falsedad — 
pero ahora está haciéndose tarde, y su familia va a preocuparse, así que 
tenemos que despedimos. ¡Adiós! 

Agarró con fuerza la mano del sapo, lo metió bruscamente en su 
guitarra, y comenzó el vuelo de regreso a la tierra. 

— Me gustan tus amigos — dijo el sapo, tratando de entablar una 
conversación. 

El cuervo volaba y no contestaba. 

El sapo empezó a sentir un temor profimdo; tal vez el cuervo quería 
castigarlo... ¿qué le haría? 

— Discúlpame, amigo cuervo, pero yo me escondí en tu guitarra 
porque quería saber lo que es volar — dijo el sapo. 

— ¿Quieres saber lo que es volar? — gritó el cuervo — ¡Bien! ¡Ahora 
te enseñaré! 

El cuervo dio vuelta la guitarra y el pequeño sapo salió por el agujero 
y comenzó a caerse hacia la tierra distante. ¡Qué miedo sintió! ¡No quería 
morirse! Quería rezar pero no podía; solamente podía gritar — ¡Aaaaaaa! 

Después de caer durante lo que parecía una eternidad, el sapo pegó en 
la tierra. Aterrizó en las hierbas silvestres cerca del charco y no se murió, 
pero las piedras pequeñas y afiladas lastimaron mucho su piel. La espalda 
del pobre sapo se llenó de moretones y cortes que se hincharon. No podía 
caminar a causa del dolor, allí se quedó sobre la espalda, casi desmayado. 
A la mañana siguiente un tío lo encontró y lo llevó al charco. Su familia lo 
cuidaba y lo trataba con algas marinas, y mientras su cuerpo sanaba 
lentamente, él les contaba acerca del vuelo fantástico y de la fiesta de las 
aves en el cielo. Poco a poco las heridas sanaron, pero en su piel quedaron 
manchas descoloridas iguales a las que tienen los sapos de hoy. 

El sapo volador se hizo famoso por todos los charcos del mundo. 
Sapos peregrinos viajaban desde charcos lejanos para ver al pequeño héroe 
aventurero, tocar las manchas feas de su espalda, y escuchar el cuento de su 
vuelo increíble. 

Aún hoy día, todos los sapos crecen con manchas en la espalda para 
homar y recordar a su antepasado valiente. Aunque las ranas del mimdo 
tienen piel suave y colorida, la piel manchada del los sapos muestra su 
espíritu de aventura y su gran valor. 



10. El sapo y su canción 



"itllL "j^m. 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 



Estribillo: Yiip Yiip Yiip ¡Escucha 
Al sapo y su canción! 
De la piedra en el charco canta al mundo 
El sapo y su canción 



1 . El cuervo tiene una guitarra 
Pero soy más popular que él 
El cuervo tiene una guitarra 
Pero soy más popular que él 

2. La voz del cuervo es ronca y fea 

Y soy más popular que él 

La voz del cuervo es ronca y fea 

Y soy más popular que él 

3. El cuervo vuela y yo sólo salto 
Pero soy más popular que él 
El cuervo vuela y yo sólo salto 

Y soy más popular que él 

4. El cuervo es tonto y yo soy listo 

Y soy más popular que él 

El cuervo es tonto y yo soy listo 

Y soy más popular que él 

Verso extra: 



5. El cuervo es esbelto y yo soy manchado 
Pero soy más popular que él 
El cuervo es esbelto y yo soy manchado 
Pero soy más popular que él 






10. EI sapo y su canción 




68 



Words and music by Patti Lozano 
E A 



1 J'Jl }\ 



Estribillo; Yiip Yiip Yiip Es-cu- cha al sá- po y su can- ción 

E A E A E A 



De la pie- dra en er char- co can- ta al mun- do el 
E A E dm 



Ü 



'sa- po y su can- ción -. Verso: El cuer- vo tie- ne - 

Gtt Cüm A B 



u- na gui- ta- rra, pe- ro soy más po- pu- 
CSm GS 



lar que él El 
Cttm 



mm 



cuer- 
D 



vo tie- ne 



u- na gui- ta- rra, Y 



pu- lar 



soy 



más 



po- 



que él 






EQNTENTS 



Note: Each legend is followed by song lyncs and musical notation 

1. The soldier and the lady 

A legend from the Southwestern United States 72 

2. The Real Family 

A legend from Honduras 76 

3. Uncle Tiger and Uncle Rabbit 

A legend from Venezuela 80 

4. El Sombrerón 

A legend from Guatemala 84 

5. Margarita Pareja's Blouse 

A legend from Peru 90 

6. The Gypsy's Prophecy 

A legend from Spain 94 

7. Caipora, Keeper of the Forest 

A legend from Brazil 98 

8. The Trees of the White Flowers 

A legend from Mexico 104 

9. The Origen of the Prickly Pear Cactus 

A legend from Mexico 110 

10. How the Toad got its Splotches 

A legend from Argentina 1 14 

Song lyrics in English 120 
Glossaries (Spanish-English, English-Spanish) 128 



The Soldier and the Lady 

A legend from the Southwestern United States 



Everything that you are going to hear in this story happened over fifty 
years ago, but the people in this South Texas town remember it and talk 
about it still, as if it all happened just yesterday. 

Martin Bemal was a young soldier, exhausted from many months of 
marching and training in the army in San Antonio, Texas. Finally, he was 
given one week of vacation during the month of October, in the year 1940. 
It was nighttime, when, extremely tired, he drove down the dusty road 
toward his hometown in the South Texas valley. He was thinking solely of 
greeting his parents and then lying down in a soft bed, without worrying 
about anyone waking him up early the next morning. 

Suddenly in the distance he saw a figure. The darkness of nightfall 
made him think that it had to be only his imagination. His old Chevy drew 
closer; and, with surprise, he realized that the figure was actually a woman 
standing alone at the side of the road. She flagged him down with her hand. 
Martin stopped the car and opened the window. She approached the car and 
said in a soft, low voice, "Please, take me to the dance in the town." 

Certainly the soldier didn't know that this evening there would be a 
dance in his town, and tired as he was, he had no interest in attending it. He 
detected, however, an urgency in her voice, and he felt strangely captivated 
by the mysterious woman, so he decided to take her to the dance. 

As he drove, Martin glanced at his passenger. She seemed different 
from all the other women he knew. She was beautiftil and pale, with long 
hair and penetrating green eyes, and she looked fragile yet strong at the same 
time. While all the women of this era generally wore dresses that barely 
covered their knees, this young woman wore a beautiful black dress, 
embroidered with threads of many colors; the hem reached her ankles and the 
style seemed reminiscent of the previous century. She stared at him without 
saying a word, so to make conversation he asked, "What's your name?" 

"My name is Cruz Delgada," answered the woman. She smiled at him 
with sad, gentle eyes. They didn't speak again for the rest of the ride, but 
Martin was already completely fascinated with the mysterious woman. 

The dance was aheady in full swing when they arrived. The air 



I 

illMilUlUllilBl 



72 



73 



vibrated with the notes and rhythms of the noisy orchestra and the laughter 
of the dancing couples. Everyone noticed them as they entered, but the 
solder didn't recognize anyone, and no one greeted him. Everyone stared at 
them with curiosity: Martin, still wearing his military uniform, and Cruz 
Delgada, replendant in her beautiful, but antiquated dress. When he invited 
her to dance, he noticed an uncertain expression cross her face; nevertheless, 
she did follow him to the dance floor. Martin began to dance, but the woman 
stood motionless on the dance floor. Cruz stared with bewilderment at the 
sparkling colors radiating from the dancing couples and seemed confused by 
the pulsating rhythms of the rock and roll music. She looked at him, her eyes 
huge with desperation. Hoping to reassure her, Martin smiled and continued 
dancing, but Cruz suddenly sank to her knees and burst into tears, covering 
her face with her hands to hide her embarrassment. Some couples stopped 
dancing in order to observe this little drama, and some of the girls giggled, 
covering their mouths with their hands, as they watched poor Cruz standing 
there, not knowing what to do. 

At that moment, the band struck the first few well known chords of a 
famous waltz from the century before. Cruz dried her tears on the lace of her 
dress, and, with great dignity and her eyes shining in anticipation, she 
extended her arms to dance with Martin. 

They danced and whirled around the dance floor. Cruz seemed to be 
transported to another world. At times she threw her head back and laughed 
with joy, and at other times she danced with her eyes closed, blissfully lost 
in the music. The band, noticing the unusual woman's happiness, continued 
to play waltz after waltz. 

The dance ended at midnight. Cruz took Martin's arm and together 
they left the dance, both of them very tired but happy. There was a chill in 
the October night air, and the young woman's body shivered, so in a 
gentlemanly manner, he lay his mihtary jacket over her shoulders. They got 
into the Chevy, and the soldier talked to her at length about his military 
service and all about his family. She hstened attentively but didn't make any 
comments in reply. Little by httle Martin felt her sadness return to cover her 
like a blanket. 

"Is something wrong?" he asked her finally. She appeared not to hear 
him and gave no answer. He saw one tear run down her pale cheek, 
glistening in the moonlight. 

Martin wanted to drop her off at her home, but, when they arrived at 
the site along the highway where he had first seen her, Cruz simply said in 



74 



her soft, low voice, "Thank you for everything. It was an unforgettable 
dance." Then she touched Martin's face gently with her hand, and he was 
surprised that it left a pleasant but chilly sensation. She closed the car door 
and quickly disappeared into the darkness. 

Martin watched her leave, knowing that he wanted to see her again. 
For this reason he had purposely left his military jacket with her; now he had 
a good excuse to meet her again. He looked carefully at the terrain in order 
to return to the exact same spot on the highway. 

When he finally arrived at his house, his family was sleeping. As he 
lay in the darkness in his famihar bed, the eyes of his mind still followed the 
enchanted image of Cruz Delgada dancing. When he awoke in mid-morning 
with the sun shining through his window, his first thought was of the 
mysterious woman. After greeting his family, he drove his car down the 
highway looking for the site where he had left Cruz the night before. 

In the light of day, the place was quiet and desolate. The only 
structure he saw was an small adobe hut in the distance. He walked across 
the dry terrain, between rocks and cactus, unril he stood before the wooden 
door of the hut. Martin smoothed his hair nervously and then knocked on the 
door. A few minutes passed, and nobody answered. He knocked again 
several times until finally an old lady opened the door a tiny bit and peered 
at him wordlessly. 

"I'd like to see Cruz Delgada, please," the soldier told her, "Do you 
know where I can find her?" 

"It's not possible," she answered brusquely, trying to shut the door. 

"But Cruz has my military jacket. I lent it to her last night," he said. 

The old lady looked at him incredulously.After a long pause she 
repeated in a quavering voice, "It's not possible." 

Slowly she came out of the house, and nodded her head to indicate 
that he should follow her. They walked behind the hut and followed an old 
path which ended at a tiny cemetary. She stood silently before a weathered 
gravestone around which grew lovely flowers. The soldier saw with a 
sudden shock that his military jacket was hung carefiilly over the gravestone. 
He moved the jacket to read the inscription: 

Cruz Delgada 
1842-1873 

An eerie chill ran through his bones, and, bewildered, he turned to 
look at the old woman. With tears in her eyes, she looked at him and said, 
"Cruz Delgada was my mother." 



The Real Family 

A legend from Honduras 



2 



Tegucigalpa is the capital of Honduras. Nowadays, Tegucigalpa is a 
big city, but a long time ago when the legend you are about to hear took 
place, it was just a small and picturesque village. In the suburbs of the town 
is an old street named Floreana. Midway down and on the right of this shady 
street stands a certain house that is small, pretty and empty. No one has 
lived inside this house for many generations. Families do hve in the houses 
around it, and they enjoy the shade given by the taU trees in the patio of that 
empty home. But no one dares to live inside of it. Do you want to know 
why? 

Well, they say that many years ago a family lived there whose last 
name was "Real." The family consisted of the father, Don Periquito Real, 
his wife, Misia Pepa, and their only daughter, Laura. When the Real family 
came into town, everyone noticed their presence. It was impossible not to 
see them because they always dressed in bright-colored, flowery clothing. 
They especially enjoyed shades of blue highlighted with dazzling reds, 
yellows and greens. It was also impossible not to hear the Real family 
because they never ceased to talk in loud, harsh voices. If they happened to 
see an acquaintance during their outings, the family would immediately stop 
walking and would stand there, waving desperately with their arms, 
screaming, "HELLO? HOW ARE YOU? HELLO? HOW ARE YOU?" untü 
the mortified person would finally answer them. 

Don Periquito had a voice that was both deep and loud; Misia Pepa's 
voice sounded something like a hoarse ambulance siren; and Laura's voice 
was high and shrill. Listening to their greetiugs was not a pleasurable 
experience, but the Real family didn't mind that people tended to look 
inexplicably away at their approach because they were very entertained 
simply listening to the sound of their own voices. 

They beheved themselves to be very intelligent. They were wealthy 
and had traveled to the United States. Misia Pepa knew a few words in 
English which she spoke proudly and frequently, although she actually didn't 
understand them very well. She called her daughter "Lora," or "Lorita," as 
tlie name "Laura" is pronounced in English. She often announced loudly to 



76 



77 



everyone, "MY LORITA SINGS LIKE AN EXOTIC BIRD!" 

At parties, one could often hear the voices of the Real family over 
those of the rest of the guests. If someone happened to tell a joke, the Real 
family were the first guests to explode into gales of raucous laughter, many 
times obliterating the punch line. In the marketplace, over the merchants' 
imploring voices, one could always distinguish Misia Pepa's shrill voice 
repeating "HOW MUCH IS IT"^ HOW MUCH IS IT?" or "I WANT TWO! 
I WANT TWO!" 

The people of Tegucigalpa endured the Real family and really didn't 
pay much attention to them, until the their mindless gossip began to destroy 
the town's tranquility. Whatever they happened to hear in one place, they 
repeated in another. They repeated everything they overheard whether they 
understood it or not and without realizing that their words could cause a lot 
of harm and embarrassment. For example, one day in the town's beauty 
salon, Misia Pepa accidentally discovered a secret, and the next day she 
announced to the whole village, "SEÑORA VELASQUEZ IS BALD! 
SEÑORA VELASQUEZ IS BALD!" 

Another day, Don Periquito gleefully informed the whole village that 
Don Tomás owed a certain amount of money to Don Ramón and that Don 
Tomás had the money hidden but didn't plan to pay him. 

The people of the village began to get angry at each other due to the 
gossip spread around by the Real family. Finally, the town residents decided 
to limit contact with the three meddlers by not including them in any more 
parties or town meetings. 

This decision didn't bother the Real family at all! They simply spent 
more and more time in their house, conversing together and cackling with 
laughter. They were satisfied to rest in their patio chairs and chat from dawn 
to dusk beneath the shade of the trees. Because they no longer went to town, 
they had no new tales to share, but they entertained themselves divinely by 
repeating the same old gossip and phrases. 

The day came when the Real family completely stopped going to the 
market to shop. They didn't want to lose any precious moments of chatter 
on their patio. It was really not necessary for them to buy food in the market, 
because nuts and fiiiits fell down fi-om the trees into their patio every day. 
The three were quite content just eating fiiiits and nuts and nothing more. 
After awhile the family didn't even bother anymore to go inside their house 
to sleep at nighttime; they stayed outside on the patio. No one fi-om the town 
saw them anymore, but the constant murmur of their three voices could be 



78 



heard during warm, humid nights. Many months passed as the Real family 
continued to live in this manner. 

One day, a concerned neighbor entered the Real family's patio. He left 
immediately, terrified and screaming, "Ay, ay, ay! It's witchcraft!" 

Soon a group of neighbors returned with him. They entered the patio 
and stood there astonished and dumbfounded. There was the Real family, 
still there chattering in the patio, but it was difficult to recognize them, 
because they looked more like parrots than people! Their brightly colored 
clothing had become radiant blue, red, yellow and green feathers. Their arms 
that had waved so desperately had changed into wings that were flapping the 
air, and their noses had changed into long, hard beaks. Evidently they had 
almost forgotten how to speak, because they only repeated short phrases... 
"HELLO! HOW ARE YOU! HOW MUCH IS IT? I WANT TWO! 
SEÑORA VELASQUEZ IS BALD!" 

When the three became aware of the neighbors' presence, they 
shrieked and flew up to the security of the tree branches. There they 
perched, peering down from the leaves, indignantly screaming, "HELLO! 
HOW ARE YOU!" 

The Real family never came down from the trees again. They were 
more comfortable hving among the leaves now that they had become parrots. 
It is for this reason, that still today, the little house on Floreana Street in 
Tegucigalpa remains empty. Many parrots squawk and screech from the 
nearby trees. 

These days, one can see these kinds of brightly colored parrots in 
many parts of Honduras. They shriek, scream and repeat phrases incessantly. 
In honor of the Real family, some are called "periquitos" — or parakeets — 
and the others are called "loritos reales!" 



Uncle Tiger and Uncle Rabbit 

A legend from Venezuela 

Throughout the Americas, there is an abundance of stories that tell 
about the small but clever Uncle Rabbit, who always defeats his rival, the 
large, but foohsh Uncle Tiger. These legends probably originated from tales 
created by the poor laborers who worked on the rich haciendas and 
plantations during the nineteenth century. Let's see how Uncle Rabbit wins 
the battle of the wits this time. 

It was the first day of winter, and Uncle Rabbit was sitting in his 
kitchen feeling very depressed. Through the window he saw that, although 
it was still quite sunny outside, the tree branches were almost bare of leaves. 
At the same time, he listened despairingly to the fierce roar of the wind 
coming down his chimney. 

"Poor me!" moaned the rabbit. "What's going to become of me? 
How am I ever going to survive this winter?" 

All of the neighbors had commented to him since September that the 
coming winter was going to be one of the harshest ever. His fiiend Raccoon 
had accumulated and hidden many nuts and berries, and now he rested 
peacefully inside his house. Bear had a heavy coat of ñir, so he wouldn't 
even feel the chill, and besides, during the wintery season, he slept happily 
in the back of his dark cave. 

Unfortunately, Uncle Rabbit had not prepared for the winter in any 
way. In fact, he had poked ñm at the others as they made their meticulous 
preparations. "Work is for fools!" Uncle Rabbit always said laughing. 

Now, although he was not going to admit it to his neighbors, he was 
gravely mistaken. In his pantry were two jars of pickles — nothing else. 
"How will I bear the cold without even a sweater to cover me up?" he 
worried. "How will I find food when it's snowing? Gosh, I'll starve to 
death!" 

After awhile he left his house in order to walk and contemplate his 
lamentable situation. It didn't help him that the cold wind made him shiver 
ahnost immediately. 

Suddenly he saw something colorñil lying under a twisted oak tree. 
Uncle Rabbit walked over out of curiosity and discovered that it was a 
handsome coat made from very fine wool. It was blue with green, yellow 




80 



81 



and purple designs and had elegant buttons as well as a hood The rabbit 
looked all around for the owner of the exquisite coat but didn't see anybody. 
Finally he put it on, returned to the path and continued walking. Now he 
smiled happily and even whistled because the coat had fit him perfectly. 
"Well, that solves one problem — and it was easy!" he thought. "I'm a lucky 
fellow and I'm clever too. Now... what to do about the food problem?" 

He was so totally lost in his thoughts that he jumped with surprise 
when Uncle Tiger appeared in the path and called, "Uncle Rabbit, what a 
lovely coat you have! Where did you get it?" 

An idea began to take shape in the rabbit's mind. "This coat? Why, 
I knitted it myself," he answered indifferently, turning around to show off his 
handsome coat better. 

"You know how to knit?" Uncle Tiger asked incredulously. 

"Well, of course I do!" answered the rabbit. "1 spend all my evenings 
knitting in my house. I love to knit!" 

Uncle Tiger looked at the coat with envy and thought of the rapidly 
approaching cold winter. "Rabbit, could you make me a blue coat also? FU 
pay you whatever you wish." 

The rabbit pretended to consider the offer, and then answered, "Well, 
my problem doesn't have to do with the money, but, that if I knit you a coat 
as elegant as mine, I won't have time to go shopping or even to cook my 
meals. So... I'm really sorry, but I can't help you." He pulled on the hood 
and acted as if he were about to leave. 

"No, no, no! Wait!" called the tiger. "/ can do your shopping and 
cook your meals!" 

"And will you also bring me the wool you want?" asked the rabbit. 

"Of course! No problem. I'll bring you lots of blue wool, and I'll 
cook you dehcious meals while you knit," answered the tiger, as he imagined 
himself strutting downtown in his beautiful blue coat. 

"Very well," said Uncle Rabbit. "If you bring me the wool tomorrow, 
then we can begin right away." 

The following day Uncle Tiger arrived at Uncle Rabbit's door 
carrying a huge pile of very high quality blue wool in his arms. The rabbit 
welcomed him, took the wool and sent him off to the market to buy food. 
Then quickly, before the tiger returned, the rabbit took an old book on the 
art of knitting out from under his bed. The book had belonged to his 
grandmother. Altiiough he was lazy. Uncle Rabbit was also quite intelligent, 
and in a very short time he taught himself how to knit squares of wool. 



82 



"Wow! You've really made progress!'' said the tiger happily as he 
returned with bags full of groceries. Uncle Tiger began to cook while the 
rabbit knitted in the living room. 

The winter passed in this manner. Outside the snow fell and the 
storms raged, the lakes froze over and icicles hung from the tree branches, 
but the rabbit never had to leave his home. He stayed in his rocking chair by 
the fireplace, knitting thousands of wool squares. He became quite plump 
eating the tiger's scrumptious meals. 

Uncle Tiger, the poor fool, was contented just looking at the growing 
pile of blue squares, although he did feel exhausted on account of so much 
work. Every day he trudged through the snow to the market because the little 
rabbit was always hungry. The unfortunate tiger had become quite skinny. 

Every morning as he arrived with his bags full of wool and food, he 
asked, "Is my blue coat finished?" 

"It's almost ready," the rabbit always answered. 

"Don't forget the hood and the buttons!" the tiger always reminded 
him as he went to the kitchen to begin his chores. 

One morning as Uncle Tiger walked to Uncle Rabbit's house, he 
happened to notice that the ice on the roofs was starting to melt. He listened 
to the birds' singing, he looked at the new green leaves on the tree branches 
and suddenly he realized that spring had arrived! 

"Is my blue coat finished?" he asked with little hope as soon as the 
rabbit opened the door. 

"It's ahnost ready," answered the rabbit as usual, looking beyond the 
tiger to the sunny day outside. 

"Well, I guess I don't need it anymore," sighed the tiger in a very sad 
and weary voice. 

Uncle Rabbit felt a strong desire to leave his stuffy house. He wanted 
to run, jump and play in the fields. Not only had he survived the terrible 
winter, but he felt rested and full of energy. 

"Yes, you're right," agreed the rabbit, "You don't need it anymore 
now, but you will need it next winter." He placed his paw on the tiger's 
shoulder and added, "Look, I'm going to do you a favor. I'll collect and 
save aU the wool squares, and when it turns cold again, you come again to 
my house to cook. I'll finish your coat!" 

Uncle Tiger was very pleased with this plan and he said goodbye, 
tired but hopefiil, and Uncle Rabbit went happily to the fields to reunite with 
his friends. 



El Sombrerón 

A legend from Guatemala 



Many years ago in Guatelmala there lived a little man known by the 
name "El Sombrerón," meaning "he who wears a large hat." They say that 
he was so tiny he could fit in the palm of a person's hand. He always wore 
a huge hat that covered up most of his face. He played a guitar and sang 
beautifiil and bewitching songs, and his presence was always preceded by 
four mules laden with cargo. Although he was quite a handsome and 
charismatic httle man, no one wanted to see him because his presence always 
brought sadness and misfortune. The legend that follows tells the tragic 
story of the beautiful Celina and el Sombrerón. 

Celina was a seventeen year old girl who lived in a modest home at 
the edge of a small village in Guatemala. Her parents, Don Antonio Bemal 
and his wife. Ana, owned a small tortilla factory in the center of the town. 
The tortilla store was a very popular location because all the villagers went 
there daily to buy their tortillas fresh and hot fi"om the ovens. 

Don Antonio and Doña Ana were very proud of their lovely daughter 
and loved her very much. Celina worked every day in the tortilla factory 
with her parents. She stood behind the counter, mixing the tortilla dough as 
she cheerfully greeted the customers when they entered the store. All the 
villagers had known her since she was a young child, and they always smiled 
when they saw her, because, besides being a hard worker, she was a kind and 
vivacious young lady. 

One afternoon a neighbor, Don Benito Amador, entered the tortilla 
factory and announced, "How strange! There are four mules right outside, 
tied to the side of the store." 

Another neighbor. Doña Rosa Flores, also happened to be m the store 
buying her tortillas at that moment, and she commented to the Bemals, 
"Maybe those are el Sombrerón' s mules. You ought to hide Celina because 
el Sombrerón looks for girls just like her!" 

Don Antonio walked outside with Don Benito to see the tethered 
mules, but they were no longer there. The two customers completed their 
purchases and said goodbye without speaking of the matter again. 

That same night, as the family prepared for bed, they were surprised 




84 



85 



by the "clip clop clip clop" of animals' hooves passing down the road in 
front of their house. The hooves made a strange, almost ghostly sound before 
they faded away into the still night air. 

The three Bemals lay down in their bedrooms. Celina, however, 
could not sleep, because outside of her open window she heard the most 
beautiful music she had ever heard in her life. Was it celestial or sensual? 
She couldn't decide, but she did know that she was both incapable and 
unwilling to move a muscle. Her body felt bewitched, and she hoped that 
the music would continue to play for all eternity. She listened to the guitar 
chords, their arpeggios falling from the strings like the playful waters of a 
brook and to the passionate voice of a young man singing songs of love and 
desire, hi her stupor Celina somehow dared to ask, "Who is it that honors me 
with such a beautiful serenade?" The notes continued on, however, and no 
one answered. 

The enchanting music played throughout the night and Celina stayed 
awake to listen, never sleeping or resting. At work in the morning, the poor 
girl had dark shadows under her eyes and looked very weary. 

"What's the matter today, honey? Are you getting sick?" her mother 

asked. 

"No, mama," answered Celina, "actually I'm very happy, although I 
am very tired. It's because I listened to that beautiful music playing all night 
long and I didn't want to sleep." 

"What music?" asked her mother, "Your father and I didn't hear any 
music." Celina laughed at her parents who had apparently slept so soundly 
that they had missed the entire exquisite serenade. 

That night the family once again heard the ghostly sounds of animal 
hooves clattering by the house, and Celina felt a strange new overwhelmingly 
pleasant and thrilling sensation course through her body. The mesmerizing 
music began the moment the girl lay her head on her pillow. 

"Someone out there really cares for me a lot! Who could it be?" she 
wondered, just before losing herself completely in the music. When she 
hstened to the notes, she had the sensation of soaring like a quetzal over the 
tropical rainforest canopy — the sensation of wrapping herself in a thick, soft 
velvet cloak in front of a fireplace in the winter — the sensation of cresting 
vigorous ocean waves in a sturdy sailboat. This night the music was once 
again marvelous, but in the morning poor Celina felt even more exhausted 
than she had felt the day before. She was unable to mix the tortilla dough 
with any enthusiasm, and she showed no interest in conversing with any of 



86 



the regular customers. The truth was that Celina could think only of the 
approaching evening that she fervently hoped would bring the enchanting 
music to her once again. 

Night after night the beauty of the music left her weak and dazed. 
Finally one night she could no longer bear her curiosity: she had see who 
kept singing to her in the bewitching voice. She tiptoed to the window, 
moved the curtains aside a fraction and peeked out at the patio. There, 
bathed in the moonlight, she saw a tiny man sitting on a low tree branch. 
Celina was unable to see his face for it was hidden by an enormous hat. He 
was dressed like a elegant cowboy from his black jacket to his silver spurs 
that gleamed in the moonlight. Celina sighed, and although she made no 
other movement, the Httle man suddenly raised his head and fixed his sharp 
black eyes upon Celina' s. She felt the intensity of his gaze into the center of 
her soul, and at that moment she fell hopelessly in love with el Sombrerón. 

From then on Celina could no longer eat or work. Her parents 
despaired. They hardly recognized their daughter who had become so pale, 
thin and quiet and who seemed to walk as if in a dream. The customers 
shopping at the tortilla factory also noticed the changes in the girl and they 
worried too. "What in the world is wrong with Celina?" they asked each 
other. 

One day Doña Ana finally confided in her friend. Señora Flores. "I 
just don't know what's going on with my daughter. I don't understand what's 
wrong, and I don't know how to help her!" Doña Ana twisted her hands 
together as she spoke and tried to control the tears that escaped from her 
eyes. "She doesn't even communicate with me anymore. All she does is talk 
about the music..." 

"The music!" exclaimed Señora Flores with fright, "And you, dear 
friend, do you hear the music as well?" 

"No, I don't hear anything at all," answered the mother. 

"Ay, my friend!" said Señora Flores, "I really hate to say this, but I 
fear that Celina is listening to the music of el Sombrerón. I think she has 
fallen in love with him." 

Doña Ana became frantic. "But what should I do? Tell me, please! 
Celina is my only daughter. I cannot lose her!" 

"Well, perhaps you could take her to a convent," suggested the 
woman, "because el Sombrerón is a ghost and may not enter any kind of 
church." 

That same day, with great sadness, but also hope, and over the weak 



87 



protests of their daughter, Don Antonio and Doña Ana traveled a long way 
until they arrived at the convent of Santa Rosario de la Cruz. They left 
Celina safely there in the convent in care of the nuns. 

On the way home Doña Ana began to sob, "What am 1 going to do? 
Tm going to miss her so very much!" 

Don Antonio tried to console his wife, saying, "Yes, living without 
our daughter is going to be very difficult, but we must try to protect her in 
every possible way. At least in the convent, el Sombrerón can not reach her 
with his voice. He thought a while longer and then added, "Celina is young 
and after several months she'll have forgotten about this little man. Then we 
can bring her back to live with us again." 

Doña Ana felt somewhat comforted by his words. 

That evening, as usual, the hoof beats were heard in fi-ont of the little 
house - the hoof beats of el Sombrerón's mules. As always, the little man 
made himself comfortable on the patio in order to serenade Celina, but he 
immediately sensed the girl's absence. He began to look for her. All night 
long he searched for her with growing anxiety through all the bedroom 
windows in the town. The mysterious, ghostly hoof beats were heard 
echoing down every street. By dawn, el Sombrerón knew that his search was 
in vain, and he became silent and still. He lay down his guitar and sang no 
more. For the first time in his life he felt an unbearable pain in his heart: el 
Sombrerón had fallen in love with Celina. 

In the convent the nuns cared for Celina with great tenderness, and 
they tried everything they could think of to alleviate her suffering. They 
prayed for her recovery, they sat at her bedside and told her bible stories and 
they decorated her simple room with flowers from the fields nearby. But 
poor Celina was no longer aware of anything. The reality was that without 
el Sombrerón she had no desire to live. She didn't get out of bed, she didn't 
eat and she didn't talk. One evening, a nun entered her room and found 
Celina lying motionless in her bed, her young face looking toward the 
window and her eyes staring past the curtains up at the moon. Celina had 
died. 

It was a sad and unforgettable afternoon when Celina' s parents 
brought their daughter's body back to the village. Everyone came to the 
house to bid the lovely gjrl farewell for the final time. The parlor was filled 
with the mourning of those who had known and cherished Celina since her 
childhood. Suddenly, all the voices of the villagers were drowned out by the 
deafening sound of an agonized cry like the howl of a wolf in mortal pain. 



The walls of the house shook with the intensity of the sob. 

"Mother of God!" screamed Don Benito Amador. 

No one, not even Señora Flores, thought to consider that the cry came 
from the throat of el Sombrerón who had just discovered that his beloved 
Celina lay dead in the parlor of her home. His cry was that of a shattered 
heart. 

Early that evening, the whole village, with great sadness, buried 
Celina' s young body in the cemetery. 

The following morning, when everyone walked outside their front 
doors, an incredible sight greeted their eyes. The whole town had been 
transformed into a fantasy land! The roofs were covered with colorful 
droplets of water, shimmering brightly in the morning sun. And the streets! 
Over the cobblestones flowed a river of water that resembled a rainbow 
sparkling with millions of diamonds. 

"What kind of miracle is this?" the people asked each other 
incredulously. 

Nobody knew the truth: that the shimmering droplets clinging to the 
roofs and the rainbow river flowing through the street were actually the 
crystallized tears of el Sombrerón and were the visible evidence of all that he 
had cried for the loss of his beloved Celina. 



Margarita Pareja's Blouse 

A legend from Peru 



Recently an American student was visiting her grandmother in the lovely city 
of Lima, Peru. They spent an enjoyable afternoon downtown, and the young girl 
couldn't help noticing that several times her grandmother, while examining the 
pricetags on the clothes, exclaimed "Why, this is more expensive than Margarita 
Pareja's blouse!" 

Finally the girl had to ask what the expression meant. Her grandmother told 
her that it was a very well known saying in Lima, especially used by older people 
when they wanted to criticize items they thought were overpriced. She added that 
she believed that the expression originated in the Lima's colonial era. 

"But who was Margarita Pareja?" the girl wanted to know. The 
grandmother then told her the story of Margarita Pareja and her love, Luis. 

In the year 1765, Don Raimundo Pareja, the general collector of the port of 
Callao, was one of the most prosperous businessmen in Lima. He lived in an 
impressive mansion with his wife. Doña Carmela, and their only daughter, 
Margarita. At eighteen years old, Margarita was the belle of the city. She was 
invited to all the most important parties and balls of the day, and she always danced 
and made conversation with grace and poise. She was very pretty with her dancing 
dark eyes and her slender waist. Multi-colored bows adorned her black curly hair. 
She was quite spoiled by her parents who gave her everything she desired. She had 
three wardrobes full of dresses and shoes for every occasion and countless European 
style hats to shield her face from the sun. During her years as a student she had 
attended the best schools that existed in Peru, in addition to two years spent 
studying french in Paris. Besides being rich and beautiful, Margarita was very 
bright. She loved to read and to write poetry, as well to as discuss politics and the 
new scientific discoveries of the day. Only her parents knew that behind her 
easygoing, good-natured demeanor she also possessed a stubborn and determined 
will. 

In another comer of the big city lived a poor, handsome young man named 
Luis Alcazár. He was an orphan and lived in a single room in a boarding house. 
Luis never attended parties or balls, and he had no interest in the ladies. All his 
attention centered around his long hours of work as an office clerk in a large import 
company. Luis had always been very studious throughout his school years, and, 
although he now was employed in the lowest position in the company, he hoped that 
his diligent work would make him advance quickly. This was likely to happen 
because, although the young man had no parents living, he did have an uncle, Don 



90 



91 



Honorato, who was the richest man in Lima, and who happened to be the owner of 
the same import business that employed Luis Don Honorato watched his nephew's 
progress with interest and well-hidden pride He wanted Luis to advance on his own 
merits, not due to connections with the boss 

Every year the thirtieth of August was a festive day in Lima. All the citizens 
would participate in a procession that honored Santa Rosa, the Patron Saint of the 
city. All the factories, offices, schools and stores were closed on this day, and the 
people would slowly parade around the Plaza de Armas. The rich and the poor 
together wore their best clothes and strolled, sang songs and displayed religious 
statues and paintings. Venders sold juices, fruits, nuts and com, and the children 
wore masks and waved small, colorful religious flags. 

Margarita Pareja attended the procession mounted on a white horse adorned 
with blue ribbons She waved gracefijUy at everyone, as expected from a lady of 
her high social position in the city Luis was standing in the crowd enjoying his rare 
day of leisure, and he saw her approach. When the young lady passed before him, 
she happened to glance down at him Their eyes locked for a single moment, and 
in that instant their souls fused together and they fell deeply in love. Luis followed 
the procession through the streets, his heart pounding When the event ended and 
Margarita dismounted her horse, he took her in his arms and kissed her. 

EXiring the ensuing months, Luis found it dificult to concentrate on his work. 
He spent every afternoon possible with Margarita on her patio. They discovered 
that, in spite of her wealth and his poverty, they had much in common, they shared 
the same goals, beliefs and perspectives Above all, they shared a deep and 
passionate love. While they were conversing about new inventions or exotic 
cultures, their eyes were saying, "I love you." 

Four months later they decided to marry. Luis sought out Don Raimundo 
and respectfully asked for his daughter's hand The father listened to the request 
with silent fury. He was horrified at the suggestion that this insignificant young 
man should even consider the possibility of becoming his son-in-law. Needless to 
say, he firmly denied the marriage. Luis left the mansion devastated and depressed. 

Standing at the window, seething, Don Raimundo watched the suitor leave. 
Then he sought out his wife and daughter and finally found them reading in the 
garden. 

"That streetrat!" he yelled. "You have your pick of any suitor in the entire 
city and you want to marry this insignificant clerk! No! I will not permit it! Never! 

His raging screams were heard along the entire street. The neighbors began 
to gossip, and a mere few days later the story reached the ears of Don Honorato, 
Luis's uncle. He became even more fiirious than Margarita's father, and he 
screamed, "That pompous peacock Don Raimundo! How dare he insult my nephew 
this way? Luis is the finest young man in the entire city of Lima!" 



92 



Margarita was desconsolate. She cried, she screamed, she tore out hunks 
of her hair. She threatened to become a nun. Don Raimundo refused to change his 
mind. Doña Ana felt compassion for her daughter because she remembered love's 
overpowering intensity; and she begged her husband to reconsider his position, but 
he only reiterated his answer, "No, my daughter will not marry a poor office clerk." 

Margarita resolved to take drastic measures. She stayed in her bed and 
refiised to eat or drink. Little by little, she grew thin and pale and her body became 
weak. Only when Don Raimundo feared that she may die, did he finally relent and 
say, 'Tf you love him this much, I suppose I must give my blessing to this marriage." 

He made an appointment to speak with Don Honorato. But the uncle still 
felt very offended with the humiliating treatment that his nephew had received, and 
he told Don Raimundo, "I will only consent to this marriage on one 
condition — neither now or ever will you give even one penny to your daughter. 
Margarita must make a home with Luis wearing only the clothes on her back and not 
a thing more! 

Don Raimundo was very angry, but he forced himself to think foremost of 
his daughter's wishes. "AH right," he agreed without joy, and then with a handshake 
he promised, "I swear that I will give my daughter nothing more than her bridal 
gown." 

The month of May arrived, and all the city celebrated the grand wedding of 
Margarita and Luis. Margarita was resplendent in her wedding gown. Don 
Raimundo and Don Honorato forgot their disagreements and looked proudly at the 
happy couple. Don Raimundo complied with his promise: never again in life or in 
death did he give his daughter another thing. 

But what a wedding gown! The embroidery that adorned the blouse was 
made of pure gold and silver threads. The cord that adjusted the neckline was a 
chain of diamonds, and the buttons were pearls. Margarita's bridal blouse alone 
was worth a fortune! 

Luis and Margarita enjoyed a long and prosperous marriage and had many 
children and grandchildren. It is supposed that the extravagant wedding blouse still 
belongs to the descendents of the Alcazár family because no one ever saw it again 
after the wedding day, and no one has ever seen it since. 

It is for this reason that now, two centuries later, when a citizen of Lima talks about 
something expensive, many times she exclaims, 'Tt's more expensive than the blouse 
of Margarita Pareja!" 



The Gypsy's Prophecy 

A legend from Spain 




When traveling through Spain, one can see the blend of Christian and 
Moorish cultures everywhere. The two distinct styles are expressed in 
architecture, in folk music, in handicrafts, and in much more. 

The North African Moors invaded the Iberian peninsula, the land that 
is Spain, in the year 71 lA.D, and there they ruled for seven centuries. The 
south and central areas of the country prospered under Moorish authority, but 
in the northern regions small Christian settlements began to form and resist 
Moorish rule. Most notably in the zealous Christian kingdom of Asturias, 
located in the penninsula's northwestern comer, fierce battles took place 
between the Christians and the Moors. This same region would later become 
the birthplace of Spanish hberty. 

Many legends have survived as reminders of the numerous conflicts 
between the two religious and cultural forces in Asturias. The following 
story will tell us of the Moorish prince, Abd al-Aziz, and how he saved 
himself from the soldiers of the powerfiil and famous Don Pelayo who hved 
in what is still today the province of Asturias. 

The battle lasted two days. The soldiers of the young Moorish prince, 
Abd al-Aziz had fought bravely, but Don Pelayo 's army exceeded them in 
both number as well as íq passion for their cause, and the Christians emerged 
victorious. All the Moorish soldiers had either been killed or had been 
chained and thrown in prison by orders of Don Pelayo. Only Prince Adb al- 
Aziz and his manservant had escaped. 

Around midday they had fled by foot from Don Pelayo's bloody 
lands. It had been simple at first to cross through the broad fields of wheat 
in the valley, but later it became much more difficult as they had to climb up 
the rocky hills. The two men were both demoralized and exhausted. Finally, 
after many hours of traveling they reached a brook flowing with cool, clear 
water and the servant begged, "Please, let us stop here for awhile to rest and 
drink water. 1 am so tired and thirsty I can walk no fiirther." 

"No, " answered the prince regretfully, "You may drink from the 
brook, but we cannot rest here. I am certain that Don Pelayo has discoveied 
our escape, and he will have aheady sent his soldiers to capture us." 



94 



95 



"What do you plan to do?" asked the servant. 

"I want to arrive at the mountains before nightfall. A small village is 
there where we may hide ourselves; we must have sleep and rest in order to 
regain our strength to continue on toward Córdoba tomorrow." 

The two Moors resumed walking and soon reached the foothills of the 
mountains, but darkenss fell before they arrived at the village. They had 
come to a rocky area where it was dangerous to walk at night because the 
terrain was uneven. With one false step, they could tumble off a cliff and fall 
to their deaths. The men began to look for a sheltered place where they 
could spend the night. 

After awhile the servant spied a large cave and spoke to the prince, "I 
have found a cave nearby that appears to be large and empty. It will protect 
us from the wind, and we will be able to sleep there without being 
discovered. What do you think, my lord?" 

Abd al-Aziz walked to the cave and stood before the entrance with his 
arms folded, regarding it critically. Then he smiled, relaxed and said in a 
confident voice, "Yes, I am happy with this cave. We will be safe here. We 
shall sleep in peace because Allah will protect us." 

"I wish I had your conviction, lord." commented the servant, "May 
I ask why you feel so secure?" 

"Certainly," said the prince, "look at the top comer of the cave 
entrance. What do you see there?" 

"Well, nothing other than a small spider," answered the servant. 

"Yes, and that Uttle spider is the reason that I no longer fear the night 
or the cave," said the prince, "Let us enter and make ourselves comfortable. 
Then I shall explain everything to you." 

So the two men entered the cave and rested their aching bodies in the 
soft, cool dirt, hi the darkness, Abd al-Aziz began to speak, "Do you 
remember about six months ago when we went to the festival in Granada?" 

"Oh, yes," answered the servant, "You feasted and partied until dawn 
in those caves at the outskirts of the city ." 

"Yes, I enjoyed myself immensely," remembered the prince with a 
smile, "But did you realize that those were the caves of the gypsies? Well, 
1 was curious about them, so during the night I visited a gypsy woman and 
asked her to tell me of my ñiture. 1 expected her to speak of love or riches, 
but do you know what she told me?" 

The servant didn't answer, but the prince continued his narrative 
anyway. "I remember her exact words because they seemed so strange to 



96 



me. She said 'I recommend that you always take care of spiders. I counsel 
you to always respect and protect them. Do not forget my words! ' 

"Well, I couldn't help laughing," the prince admitted, "but the gypsy 
woman grew very serious and said, 'If you value your life, you will heed my 
advice, because one day in your future, a spider may save your life.'" 

The cave was silent. "What do you think of that?" he asked his 
servant, but there was no reply because the exhausted man had already fallen 
asleep. So Abd al-Aziz also closed his eyes and slept soundly without 
dreams through the night. Nothing disturbed him until morning, when he 
was awakened by his servant who was insistently shaking his shoulder. 

"Say nothing, lord," whispered the frightened man, "Just listen!" 

The men heard the clattering of hooves outside the cave, and a strong 
voice above the commotion, yelling, "Over here! Search this cave!" 

"No, that's a waste of time," answered another voice. "No one has 
entered that cave in ages!" 

"So what should we do now?" asked a young voice. 
The prince and the servant quietly hid behind a boulder in the back of the 
cave and continued to listen without moving a muscle, almost without daring 
to breathe. 

"Well, there's a village nearby. I'll bet that's where the infidels are 
hiding. We'll ride over there now to continue our search!" said the first 
voice. 

"But what if we don't find them there?" asked the young voice. 

"Then we will have to return to Don Pelayo. We will be forced to 
admit that the prince and his servant escaped. May God protect us from his 
fury!" With that, the voices and hoof beats faded away, as Don Pelayo' s 
soldiers galloped toward the village in the mountains. 

"Thanks be to Allah!" exclaimed Abd al-Aziz, as the two men 
collapsed with rehef "We will remain here until afternoon, and then we will 
travel past the village and on to Córdoba without worry." 

"Why didn't they look for us here in the cave?" marveled the servant. 
The two Moors left their hiding place behind the boulder, and approached the 
sunny entrance of the cave. "It's a miracle!" exclaimed the servant, clasping 
his hands and falling to his knees. 

"No, this is the spider from the gypsy's prophecy" said the prince. 
During the night, the small spider had constructed her web, a delicate curtain 
of silvery threads, that now completely covered the entrance of the cave. 



Caipora, Keeper of the Forest 

A legend from Brazil 



There are many in the world who respect the beauty of the rainforest 
and who understand the importance of every tree and animal. There also exist 
those who try to take advantage of her natural resources at any price. In 
Brazil, those in harmony with the rainforest speak reverently of Caipora, 
Keeper of the Forest. 

Caipora is said to be an omnipotent being who rules the rainforest, 
watches over those that live there and punishes the people who destroy her 
plants and living creatures. No one has actually seen Caipora, so we can 
only guess what he looks like, but there are various legends that tell of his 
presence in the rainforest. In this tale we will meet two young workers who 
each have fateful encounters with Caipora, Keeper of the Forest. 

Two young woodcutters went together every morning to work in the 
rainforest near the village where they lived with their wives and children. 
Toño, who was just six months older than his companion. Chico, marveled 
at the beauty of the rainforest every morning as he went to work. He admired 
the deUcate tropical flowers that grew between the massive roots of the trees. 
He noticed the graceful twists of the thick vines that hung from the spreading 
tree branches. He walked gently as not to disturb the flocks of flamingos he 
saw standing in the ponds of brackish water. He delighted in watching the 
innumerable brilliantly colored butterflies and in listening to the indignant 
chatter of the monkeys and the macaws from high up in the canopy of dense 
green leaves. 

His companion. Chico, didn't observe anything in nature. He walked 
along at Toño's side always talking in a loud voice. He never looked at the 
path they followed so he often stepped on insects scurrying on the fallen 
leaves and many times he thoughlessly smashed the nests of small animals. 
He enjoyed throwing small stones at the leaping monkeys and laughed at 
their comical shrieks of pain when they were hit. Chico did not like being 
a woodcutter; he believed he was destined to be rich and famous, and he 
always talked about his great plans for the fiiture. 

The woodcutters' task was to cut branches suitable for firewood and 
then load it into their backpacks or carts and lug it all home. There they 




98 



99 



would char the wood to turn it into coal, and later they would sell it to clients 
in the town nearby. 

The two woodcutters always chose their daily work sites with great 
care. Toño never damaged the forest; he always looked for trees with low 
branches that he could cut without causing harm. He never cut too many 
branches off any single tree, and his machete never touched the trunks 
because he didn't want to destroy the homes of any animals that might live 
there. Toño's firewood was not of a very good quality, and for this reason 
he was very poor, but he was happy with his life. When Toño felt like 
resting, he would sit in the shade of a tree and play his flute, a delicate little 
pipe sculpted out of balsa wood. 

Chico, on the other hand, searched for the most majestic trees, and, 
with sohd strokes of his machete, he cut them at the base of their trunks. He 
didn't care what animal might abide there or whether the tree might be a 
hundred years old; Chico only wanted top quality firewood. Chico rested 
from his labors with his rifle by practicing his aim at toucans, ocelots and 
other small creatures. 

One morning Chico didn't go to the forest because he felt like visiting 
with his buddies in the village. Toño went to work alone and entered the 
rainforest with great pleasure because the truth was that he didn't enjoy 
Chico's companionship very much. This morning, however, he quickly 
perceived that everything in the forest was peculiar — different — expectant. 
The birds were not singing, and the monkeys were perched quietly on the tree 
branches just watching. Toño saw the gleaming eyes of other animals peering 
out from between the ferns. The air didn't move; it seemed thick. The trees, 
however, seemed to shiver with a kind of anticipation. Toño felt anxious and 
fearful, but he couldn't exactly say why. 

a chilly wind brushed across his face, followed by a thick, gray fog 
tiiat slowly settled over the rainforest. Toño was unable to see anything more. 
He listened with growing apprehension to savage noises that he didn't 
recognize and had never heard before. 

Toño was now terrified. He stood there paralyzed with fear; he could 
not worii, nor could he see to return to his village. He had always treasured 
the rainforest, but now he feared that this day he might die there. He knelt 
down and closed his eyes tightly so he wouldn't have to look out at the 
frightening daricness. After awhile he smelled a sfrange, pleasant and sweet 
aroma, like freshly cut grass, which seemed to hover around him. Then the 
ground began to shake with the vibration of heavy footsteps; Toño opened 



100 



his eyes wide with terror and saw a monstruous apparition suddenly appear 
through the fog. The wind whispered the name, "Ca/.../7o...ra," and Toño 
realized that this must be the legendary "Caipora, Keeper of the Forest!" 

Toño stood up, his head bowed, and stood trembhng before the 
enormous body, dreading the sensation of sharp fangs piercing his neck. But 
it didn't happen. 

"Look at me, woodcutter!" ordered Caipora. 

Slowly Toño raised his head and gazed from die feet to the head of the 
ghostly being. He was enormous, and his fiir was the color and texture of 
the forest grasses. His fingernails and toenails were like rough, uneven pine 
bark. He had the face of a wolf with sharp white fangs and the glowing, 
yellow eyes of a jaguar. His most fiightening feature was that his feet were 
inverted, so his toes faced backwards! 

Caipora stared down at the figure of the miserable little woodcutter, 
and then he threw back his head and howled. Toño noticed with 
astonishment that from his grotesquely open mouth emerged bright orange 
butterflies and small seeds that, as they fell upon the earth, inmiediately grew 
and blossomed into beautiful flowers. 

"Play your pipe, woodcutter!" ordered Caipora. 

"Yes," stammered Toño, and quickly he took it out of his pocket and 
with trembling fingers, played a lovely melody. 

Caipora closed his yellow eyes to listen, and his body emitted the 
aroma of fresh herbs. The whole forest seemed to relax and to enjoy the 
gentle notes flowing from the woodcutter's flute. 

"Will you give me your pipe?" asked Caipora when the song ended. 

"Yes... with pleasure," answered Toño, and still trembling, he gave 
Caipora his wooden flute. 

The Keeper of the Forest took the flute in his immense paw and stared 
at the quaking woodcutter once more before abruptiy turning and 
disappearing into the dark mist. 

Toño sank to his knees and cried with rehef He remained this way for 
a long time, but httle by httle he noticed that the fog had dissipated, and the 
noises of the rainforest were once again those of any normal day. 

"Maybe it was a dream," thought Toño, "1 must work really hard to 
forget this experience!" He began to cut branches careñilly, and that 
afternoon he returned to his cottage with his backpack filled with wood as 
usual. 



101 



After dinner he began to char the wood, but he noticed with surprise 
that these particular branches produced the best charcoal that he had ever 
made in his life. When he brought it to the town, his clients exclaimed at its 
superior quality. He earned a lot of money from that load of charcoal. 

From then on, it didn't matter where Toño chose to cut his wood, the 
charcoal he made was always of an exceptional quality. After awhile he was 
able to enter his beloved rainforest again without fear of another encounter 
with Caipora, but sometimes he thought he heard the notes from his little 
flute blowing in the wind. In a few months Toño's charcoal had made him 
a wealthy man; he had plenty of time to rest, play with his children and to 
enjoy life. 

Chico, however, continued the monotonous routine of walking to the 
forest every morning. He was very envious every afternoon when he would 
pass by Toño's cottage, staggering under the weight of the wood in his 
backpack, and Toño would greet him from his porch. He would ask himself, 
"How is it possible that my friend, who hardly works at all, has become so 
rich, while I, who cut down so many trees every day, am still poor?" 

Finally one day, Chico couldn't contain his curiosity any longer, and 
he asked his friend, "Please, Toño, tell me the secret of your good fortune." 

Toño still marveled over his encounter with Caipora and many times 
doubted that he had actually had the experience. For this reason he felt 
embarrassed to relate too many details. "Well, 1 suppose my fortune changed 
that day that you didn't go to work, and I met Caipora, Keeper of the Forest." 

"You met Caipora, the Monster of the Rainforest!" exclaimed Chico 
incredulously, "What did he do to you?" 

"Well, 1 was very finghtened," admitted Toño, "but he didn't do 
anything to me... he asked for my pipe and I gave it to him... that's all." 

Chico was mad with envy, "a pipe! That's all?" he thought, "Well, I 
smoke all the time; I have lots of pipes at home. I'll choose one of the best 
ones to give to Caipora, and he'll make me even richer than he made Toño!" 

The next morning Chico entered the forest and, standing among the 
trees, impatiently screamed, "Caipora! Where are you? Caipora! I'm Chico, 
the woodcutter! Show yourself!" 

Immediately the sun shone with an unbearable light, and, with a 
terrible roar, Caipora appeared. The air filled with the unpleasant odor of 
rotting leaves. 

"Look at me, woodcutter!" ordered Caipora. 

Chico felt a sudden apprehension. "Look, Caipora, can you give me 



102 



wood that makes good charcoal? I brought you a really nice pipe. Take it." 
With a trembling hand. Chico offered the monstruous beast his favorite pipe 
stuffed with tobacco and ready to smoke. 

Caipora howled with fiiry; wasps and snakes shot out of his open 
mouth, and then, with a single swipe of his paw, he destroyed Chico's pipe. 

"You destroy my forest!" bellowed Caipora, "You kill my trees and 
my animals! You, miserable woodcutter, will never again return harm my 
forest!" 

A hot wind blew, and whirlwinds of decaying leaves completely 
obscured the bodies of the Protector of the Forest and the unfortunate 
woodcutter. When the wind calmed down and the leaves settled on the 
ground, both Caipora and Chico had disappeared. Chico did not return to the 
village, not that night, and never again. 

Generally the people who live in the village do not enter the forest at 
night because the total darkness is frightening and also because many animals 
tend to become more aggressive and fearless. People also speak of the 
ghostly apparition that nightly floats restlessly among the branches of the 
trees: it's the terrifying form of a anguished young man with a broken pipe 
in his mouth, and his feet are inverted with his toes facing backwards. 



The Trees of the White Flowers 

A legend from Mexico 



Which is stronger: love or hate? This ancient Mexican legend explores 
these opposite forces, and at the same time explains how the beautiful 
magnolia trees came to grow in Mexico City. It is interesting to note that the 
white flower petals of this tree are so delicate that they bruise even when 
they are just barely touched; the heavenly fragrance these flowers emit is 
much stronger than the beauty of the fragile blossoms. 

The time was the mid fifteenth century, and the Zapotee people were 
celebrating the young king who had just ascended the throne in the beautifiil 
city of Juchitán, in the region of Mexico that is today named Oaxaca. The 
new king's name was Cosijoeza, and he was wise, benevolent and brave. 
Although he was a distinguished warrior, he found great peace in the 
enjoyment of nature's beauty. Within his palace walls he had extensive 
gardens with a wide variety of bushes, flowers and trees that pleased him, as 
well as stone benches on which he could rest to enjoy his surroundings. In 
all his gardens he had one type of tree which he treasured above all others. 
It grew straight and gave shade with it's shiny, dark, green leaves, and it had 
large white flowers that gave off a celestial scent. These trees could be found 
only within the palace walls of Juchitán, but they were renowned and 
coveted in civilizations far away. 

One afternoon a group of important-looking emissaries arrived from 
the powerful Aztec king, Ahuitzoti. The Aztecs were sworn enemies of the 
Zapotees; many bloody battles had been fought between tihe two tribes. 
Cosijoeza's guards, stationed on the fortress walls, immediately became 
tense and alert, fearing a skirmish or some sort of deception. But the 
emissaries had come only to deliver a message to the young Zapotee king. 

"AJiuitzotL, our illustrious king sends his greetings," announced the 
chief emissary. "Also, he requests that you give us some of your famous 
Trees of the White Flowers to plant in the canals of our magnificent city, 
Tenochtitlán." 

Cosijoeza pretended to consider the request, but in truth he hated the 
ruthless Aztec king, and he would never voluntarily agree to share the most 
precious of his trees with his most hated enemy. After a pause, he said, "No, 




104 



105 



it is not possible. These trees will never leave my kingdom. Please depart 
now, as this is my fmal answer." 

The group of emissaries was surprised as well as insulted and left 
Juchitán with clenched fists and murderous expressions in their eyes. 

Cosijoeza sat in his garden to meditate upon the situation. He felt 
certain that his enemy Ahuitzotl would now send an army of Aztec warriors 
to fight with his people, and they would try to take the Trees of the White 
Flowers by force, killing ruthlessly and taking many prisoners as they did so. 
He felt very sad. He did not wish a bloody battle for his kingdom and did not 
want to cause the senseless death of any Zapotees. "Oh well," sighed the 
young king, "life is never simple. We had better prepare for the worst." 

Then he gathered his chief warriors together and warned them that 
someday soon the Aztecs were going to attack Juchitán. "We must prepare 
for the invasion" he said. "You all know that the Aztecs are numerous and 
powerful, and their gods are bloodthirsty and cruel. They are very angry 
because I insulted them. You, brave warriors, will have to fight with all your 
strength and skill in order to save the lives of the families of our kingdom. 
Our men must now fortify the walls, and the women must stock provisions 
in the hiding cellars, as well as prepare the poison for our arrows." 

The warriors spread Cosijoeza' s distressing predictions and explicit 
orders throughout Juchitán, and the frightened people worked hard to 
prepare for the dreaded attack. 

Meanwhile, Ahuitzotl' s emissaries returned to Tenochtitlán, and, 
standing before their king, relayed the young Zapotee king's insulting 
answer. As Cosijoeza had expected, the Aztec king was livid with anger. 

"I'll gather my army, and I'll destroy that insignificant king!" 
bellowed Ahuitzotl, "That insolent Zapotee king's heart will be the battle's 
first sacrifice to our fierce god of war, Huitzilopochtli!" 

Later when he calmed down, he began to think shrewdly. "No, I think 
I shall make a trap. In this way I will not spend the blood of my warriers, yet 
I can still surprise the enemy. I will take many prisoners and at the same 
time I will take possession of all the Trees of the White Flowers." 

Soon he sent for Coyolicatzin, his loveliest and most intelligent 
daughter. He sat her before him and began to explain his clever plan. "My 
daughter, I want to possess the renowned Trees of the White Flowers, and at 
the same time defeat the Zapotee tribe. I need your help." 

"Yes, father," said Coyolicatzin, bowing her head obediently. 

"This is what you must do," continued Ahuitzotl. "In three days you 



106 



will leave Tenochtitlán with two servants. Be aware that the trip to the 
Zapotee kingdom will be long and difficult. Now, when you arrive there, 
you will cleanse yourself in the river outside the city walls. Then you will 
put on your sweetest perfixme, your most beautifiil robe and your most 
precious jewels. Do you understand me so far?" 

"Yes, father," answered Coyolicatzin again, baffled but attentive. 

Ahuitzotl continued, "Then, without your servants, you will search for 
the palace of the Zapotee king. Enter the palace walls with great confidence 
so no one questions you. You will then see extensive gardens — quite 
impressive I am told — and you will see the Trees of the White Flowers. Wait 
there. The naive young king will find you there, and you will make him fall 
in love with you. You will marry this Zapotee king, and 1 will give you a 
splendid wedding. " 

Coyolicatzin did not like this at all, but she sighed and answered 
dutifully, "Yes, father, for you and for Tenochtitlán." 

"It will not be for always, daughter," promised Ahuitzotl quickly. 
"After the wedding, your task is to quietly discover all the secrets of the 
Zapotee kingdom. When you know everything, you will return to 
Tenochtitlán, telling your husband you must visit your tribe. Tell me all their 
secrets, and then our army wiU march to Juchitán to destroy them! You, my 
princess, will stay in Tenochtitlán, and all will admire you for your bravery 
and cunning. You may then marry a noble Aztec warrior of your choice, and 
you will never return to Juchitán." 

"I will do my best to honor you and my people," promised 
Coyohcatzin, and she departed her father's temple to begin the preparations 
for her journey. 

Meanwhile, in Juchitán, Cosijoeza was anxious. Why was nothing 
happening? All his instincts told him to expect an attack soon, but all the 
roads leading to his kingdom were strangely quiet. Every day he sat on a 
stone bench in his fragrant garden to relax, think, plan and worry. 

One morning, as he rested there, he saw a beautiñil young lady 
dressed in an exquisite robe, standing alone in his garden, leaning against the 
trunk of one of the Trees of the White Flowers. 

"Who are you?" asked Cosijoeza, startled. "You look like a princess 
who has descended from a temple in the heavens." 

She smiled, blushed, and remembered to answer with the words she 
had prepared. "I come from foreign lands... I am lost and wander in search 
of happiness." 



107 



Cosijoeza was curious about the mysterious young lady, and he felt 
very attracted to her as well, so he invited her to his palace, and she, of 
course, accepted the invitation. 

Inside the Zapotee palace, Coyolicatzin was fascinated by the 
differences between her native culture and this culture that was unknown to 
her. She quickly learned many new words in the Zapotee language, she 
sampled numerous fruits and vegetables that were foreign to her, and she 
learned to make the handicrafts and styles of clothing of the region. She 
neglected to be mysterious and couldn't hold back her many exuberant 
questions and comments. The young Zapotee king forgot about his worries 
and thoroughly enjoying talking with the young woman and showing her 
around his kingdom. Within a few weeks Cosijoeza knew this young woman 
was the love of his life, and he asked her to marry him, saying, "Please 
become my wife, and you shall become the queen of the Zapotee people as 
well." 

Coyolicatzin suddenly remembered her promise to her father 
Ahuitzotl, but at the same time she could not completely deceive the kind 
Cosijoeza, and she sadly answered, "It would be difficult for me to be your 
wife, because you see, my father is the Aztec king, Ahuitzotl." 

Cosijoeza was very angry. He realized the young woman had 
deceived him, and he refused to see her or speak with her again. 

Heartbroken, Coyolicatzin returned to Tenochtitlán and admitted to 
her father that she had failed in her mission. Ahuitzotl was disappointed but 
forgave his beautifid daughter while quietly resolving to find another plan to 
defeat the arrogant Zapotee king. 

Back in Juchitán, the young woman's betrayal had left the Zapotee 
king utterly devastated. Nothing seemed to matter anymore. Even his 
beloved Trees of the White Flowers gave him no pleasure. He finally 
decided, after much despair, that he wished to many Coyolicatzin in spite of 
her deception. 

He then sent five Zapotee emissaries to Ahuitzotl in Tenochtitlán, 
their arms laden with gifts — tropical birds, magnificent vases, necklaces of 
silver, jars of honey, and more. "Our wise king Cosijoeza offers you these 
riches from Juchitán and respectfiilly requests the hand of the princess 
Coyolicatzin in marriage," said the chief messenger. 

Ahuitzotl was gleefijl. His plan had worked after all! He graciously 
accepted the gifts and announced to his surprised people that the lovely 
IHincess, Coyohcatzin, would marry the Zapotee king, Cosijoeza. The young 



108 



woman happily returned to Juchitán, and after three months of preparations, 
the whole kingdom celebrated the wedding of their beloved king with the 
beautiñil Aztec princess. 

Cosijoeza and Coyohcatzin were very happy and every day feU deeper 
in love. The Zapotee people adored their beautiful, compassionate and 
intelligent queen. The whole kingdom seemed to prosper under the rule of 
the happy couple. Cosijoeza liked to tell his young wife everything. He did 
not hide any secrets and consulted her in all important decisions. Within a 
short time, Coyohcatzin knew where the fortress walls were weak, where the 
hiding cellars were and how they were stocked, and how to make the poison 
for the arrows. She was also aware that her father in Tenochtitlán awaited 
tiiis information more desperately with every passing day. Coyohcatzin felt 
weighted down by a pressing dilemma; she had to obey her father, yet she 
loved her husband with all her heart, as well as the peaceful Zapotee people. 
She knew she was no longer capable of betraying them. "What do 1 do?" 
she thought in tears, "I'm the one caught in my father's trap!" 

Finally she came to a decision: "My husband is an understanding man 
and he loves me. I will tell him the truth." That afternoon, Coyohcatzin led 
her husband into the gai den and they sat under one of the Trees of the White 
Flowers, the same tree where they had first seen each other. Coyohcatzin, 
tearful and trembling, confessed the entire devious plan since it's beginning 
with her father in Tenochtitlán. 

Cosijoeza listened to everything, and then he embraced her and 
calmed her with tender words. "I forgive you, dearest wife. You have 
demonstrated loyalty to my kingdom in all your actions and 1 trust you 
completely." The young king felt profound compassion for his young wife, 
for the many months she had suffered with such a tremendous burden in her 
heart. "What can I do to demonstrate my forgiveness and my love?" thought 
the king, looking up at the leaves of his treasured tree. Suddenly the answer 
came to him. 

The following day, Cosijoeza sent the Aztec king ten beautiful Trees 
of the White Flowers. His love had conquered his hate. Ahuitzotl, the 
powerful Aztec king, and Cosijoeza, the kind Zapotee king, never battled 
each other again. 

The Trees of the White Flowers, the magnolias, can still be seen at 
the site of Tenochtitlán, the ancient capital of the Aztecs, which today is 
called Mexico City, the capital of Mexico. 



The Origin of the Prickly Pear Cactus 

A legend from Mexico 




Mexico has many different landscapes; there are majestic mountains, 
pristine beaches, steamy jimgles and bustling cities. But more than anything 
else, when one pictures a single landscape of Mexico, it is that of a cactus in 
the desert. The most well-known and beloved cactus is the short, spiny 
prickly pear. It twists itself into unusual configurations as it grows, and on 
top of its succulent leaves grow jfruits that look like juicy red pears. The 
prickly pear is a very useful plant; the leaf is often cooked and eaten as a 
vegetable, and the fruit is a delicacy. This cactus, which is frequently 
depicted on the Mexican handicrafts of today, was depicted on the Aztec 
shield five hundred years ago. The following legend tells us the importance 
of the prickly pear cactus in Mexico. 

Many centuries ago, a number of Indian tribes lived in the land that 
is today Mexico: the Mayas, the Zapotees, the Toltecs, and many more. The 
Aztec tribe was nomadic; they were not friendly. Other tribes called them 
"chichimec," which translates to "barbarians" or "sons of dogs," due to their 
cruelty in war and the bloody human sacrifice of their prisoners of war. Near 
the year 800 the Aztecs were living in seven caves when their gods gave 
them an enigmatic order: "You must search for a new land where you will 
build a great city." 

"But how will we know if the land is good?" asked the Indians. 

"You will find an eagle perched on a prickly pear cactus, devouring 
a serpent. You will build your city on this site." 

So the tribe of Aztecs began a long journey in search of these signs. 
They were accompanied by Huitzilopochtli, the god of war. For many 
centuries they wandered searching for the special signs. 

Finally, around the year 1300, the Aztecs arrived at the great valley 
ofMexico, where they stood before the big lake named Texcoco. The head 
priest gathered the tribe and aimounced, "This place is good. Here we will 
stay until our gods show us the signal telling us where to build our city." 

The land around Lake Texcoco was inhospitable; it was a swamp 
filled with poisonous snakes. The Indians had to travel to the mountains to 



110 



Ill 



get drinkable water, and the land was not good for farming. Well established 
tribes already lived in the mountains surrounding the lake, so the Aztecs had 
to form their community on an island in the middle of Lake Texcoco. 

The Aztecs were hard workers; they began to build a city. Life was 
difficult; they had to eat snake and duck meat, fish, and the larvae of the 
mosquitos that were everywhere. Little by little, and year after year, the city 
grew, and the Aztecs still waited for the signs that their gods had promised. 

Huitzilopochtli, the cruel god of war, continued to live with the 
Aztecs, and demanded the daily sacrifice of human hearts. The Indians both 
adored and feared him. In order to satisfy his appetite for blood, the Aztecs 
continually warred against neighboring tribes with the sole purpose of 
gathering prisoners destined for the sacrificial altar. All the world hated and 
feared the Aztecs, but, as their land and city flourished, their cruelty and 
power blossomed as well. 

Huitzilopochtli had a sister who lived far to the north in a peaceful 
tribe. She suffered tremendously knowing of the pain that was caused by her 
brother. She had a littíe son named Cópil; although he was just a young boy, 
he was intelligent and compassionate and was aware of this mother's 
suffering. "When 1 am grown up," declared the child, "1 will march to the 
south and I will take my uncle prisoner so he will not cause any more pain." 

"No, my son," said his mother, "never look for your imcle. He is 
powerfiil and cruel. You will not be able to defeat him." 

Cópil saw that his words frightened her, and he said no more, but 
throughout his youth his desire to stop his savage uncle grew ever stronger. 

Many years passed. Now Cópil was a brave young man, and he had 
never forgotten his resolution to defeat his uncle. He formed an army of a 
thousand men, bid farewell to his mother and started the long journey to the 
Aztec city. After many weeks the army arrived at the woods that surrounded 
the outskirts of the city. Cópil decided to spend the night there; the following 
morning their army would enter the city and would capture Huitzilopochtli 
by siuprise. Sadly, Cópil didn't know that the Aztecs had spies in the forest 
who listened to the soldiers' plans and strategies. During the night they 
raced to tell Huitzilopochtli all the details of the approaching attack. 

Huitzilopochtli became very angry and his voice thundered out a 
terrible order, "At midnight my three priests will enter the forest and will find 
Cópil. While my nephew sleeps, they will cut his heart out and will bring it 
to me as an offering. 

The three priests left on tiieir mission, happy to obey their bloodthirsty 



112 



god. They arrived in the forest and found Cópil's army without any 
difficulty. The soldiers were so tired from their travels that not one woke up 
or sensed the presence of the cautious priests. 

They distinguished Cópil by his ornate belt and his silver necklace. 
The three priests stood over the young captain, watching him sleep. The 
head priest took from his belt a sharp rock used specifically for sacrifices. 
He bent down and with one swift stroke, divided Cópil's chest in half, 
inserted his hand and drew out the palpitating heart. Cópil died without 
being aware of anything. 

The three priests returned to the city, and delivered the heart to 
Huitzilopochtli. The god held the bloody organ with satisfaction but spoke 
to himself with sadness. "What a naive young warrior, my nephew — . 
However did he ever think he could defeat me? Naive, but very brave..." 

Then he spoke to his priests. "I do not want to bravery of my young 
nephew to be forgotten. Take his heart to the small island nearby in the lake 
and bury it there amongst the rocks and the grass." 

The three priests obeyed Huitzilopchtli's orders. 

The next morning they returned to the island to discover that during 
the night a magnificent prickly pear plant had grown amid the rocks and 
grasses in the spot where they had buried Cópil's heart! 

"This plant has grown fi-om the heart of Cópil," aimounced the head 
priest, "The red finit will forever remind us of his valor and of the sacrifice 
of his life." 

As they looked at the cactus, an enormous eagle gracefully flew down 
and perched on top of it. Caught in it's talons was a twisting serpent. At this 
moment the valley became dark, and blinding lightning filled the sky. The 
three priests heard Huitzilopochtli' s powerful voice: "1 will no longer hve 
with the tribe. I will guide you from the heavens. Honor me with sacrifices 
of himian hearts, and you wül remain the most powerful tribe in the land." 

The three priests knelt down and regarded the beautiful prickly pear 
and the eagle that was now beginning to devour the snake; this was the sign 
the gods had promised them five hundred years ago. 

The Aztecs stayed on Lake Texcoco, and there they built the most 
beautiful and breathtaking city the land had knovm. They named the city 
"Tenochtitlán," in honor of the head priest, whose name was "Tenoch." 

This magnificent and enormous city still exists in the valley; it is 
called Mexico City. The Aztec coat of arms, the eagle, perched on a prickly 
pear cactus, devouring a snake, is still seen today on the Mexican flag. 



How the Toad got its Splotches 

A legend from Argentina 



The frogs of the world are exquisite; there are tiny frogs that resemble 
jewels, such as those in Central America, with their brilliant red eyes and 
bright orange feet, or those from the South American rainforest, deceptively 
innocent in their rainbow of colors, as their venom paralyzes and kills 
within minutes, and of course, the legendary bullfrogs of North America, 
with their deep, melodious songs marking the rhythm of the summer 
evenings. People, visiting the zoo, love looking at the many exotic species 
of frogs that are gathered from all around the world. 

No one, on the other hand, is interested in the toads of the world. 
Many people make ñm of the clumsy, fat toad with his thick, lumpy, mottled 
brown skin. There is not much beauty in a toad. Some people are even 
frightened of the humble toad, perhaps due to the many superstitions in 
which he plays a major role: if you touch him, you will grow warts... toads 
are a major ingredient in evil spells... all this scorn just because of the 
ugliness of the poor amphibian. But do you want to know something? The 
toads don't care. No toad pays the least bit of attention to the indifference of 
the world. They feel proud of their rough skin because it reminds them of a 
distinguished ancestor: the toad who once flew to the sky. During the warm 
spring evenings, when the humid air is filled with the rhythms and songs of 
the toads in the ponds, they still tell the following legend — of how the toad 
came to have the splotches on his skin. 

Many generations have passed since, on a small faraway island, a toad 
and a crow were good friends. The crow admired his little friend because he 
could swim, and the toad admired his feathered fiiend because he could fly. 
The toad had not explored the world very much; he had always stayed near 
the pond where he lived with his parents, his brothers and a multitude of 
aunts, uncles and cousins. The crow visited him quite often and perched 
upon a nearby rock, in his ugly, hoarse voice, would tell him about his 
wondrous journeys over hills, towns and fields of flowers. The toad would 
hang upon his every word with rapt attention. He hoped he might also see 
these marvelous sights someday, but, more than anything, he wanted to feel 
the sensation of flying in the air! 




114 



115 



One day the crow arrived at the pond, crowing with excitement about 
an invitation that had been sent to all the birds on the island. It said: 



Hear ye, all birds! Please come 
To the Fiesta in the Sky! 
Enjoy an Evening of Dance 
And the Celebration of all our Talents! 



"Please take me with you!" was the toad's immediate response. 

You can't come with me — you're just a toad!" the crow teased his 
plump little friend before flying away to begin his preparations for the fiesta. 

According to the invitation, each bird would have to demonstrate a 
unique talent at the gala. The crow perched on a branch over the pond in 
order to contemplate his special talent. He knew he had a very rasping voice, 
so he did not sing especially well. No... probably the nightingales and the 
canaries would be chosen to sing. The crow didn't know how to tell jokes 
either... probably the parrots and parakeets would entertain the guests with 
funny jokes. He certainly did not know how do dance! He supposed that the 
flamingos and swallows would dance. Without a doubt, the eagles and 
condors would showcase their aerial acrobatics. The crow began to become 
depressed. Even the quetzals and the tiny finches could show off their 
colorful plumage, but the crow had only boring black feathers. 

All of the sudden he remembered his old guitar! He found it and began 
to practice. Two strings were unfortunately missing, but at least it made an 
interesting sound. The crow played his instrument all week and tried to 
recall the lyrics to the songs that his father had taught him as a baby. 

The guitar was not in tune and the crow's voice was exceedingly 
hoarse and unpleasant, but he was not concerned; he believed that to possess 
enthusiasm was infinitely more important than to possess talent. The 
unfortunate toads that lived in the pond below had to listen to the crow's 
concerts both day and night, and sooner or later they all had tremendous 
headaches. 

Finally the day of the great fiesta arrived. The crow spent the morning 
polishing his old guitar with dry leaves until it shone and warming up his 
voice singing scales and arpeggios. At noon he flew down to style his black 
feathers with pond water. 



116 



"Please take me with you!" begged the toad when he saw his friend. 

"No, you cannot come to this fiesta," said the crow. "You don't have 
wings, you don't have feathers, and you're not a bird! I'll tell you all about 
it tomorrow." 

The toad sighed with great sadness and looked up wistfully at the 
endless blue sky. The crow paid no attention to him and continued to preen 
himself with pond water. The toad was on the verge of begging on his knees, 
when he suddenly spied the guitar laying in the weeds behind the crow, and 
a marvelous idea came to him. Without saying another word, the toad hopped 
inside the guitar, wriggling through the space where the two strings were 
missing, and there he hid, completely quiet and motionless. 

The crow fmished preparing his appearance and observed his 
reflection in the pond. "How handsome I am!" he thought, admiring himself 
from all sides. "Bye, Toad! I'm offl" called the crow. He didn't see his 
friend, but he had no time to search for him now because he did not want to 
arrive late to the party. He held the guitar neck firmly in his talons and went 
flying off. Such was his enthusiasm and excitement that he didn't notice the 
slight additional weight of his guitar. 

The toad, hidden inside the instrument, was jubilant to feel the 
incomparable sensation of flight! It was more wonderful that he had ever 
imagined! 

In no time at all they had arrived at the fiesta in the sky. The crow, 
leaving his guitar at the entrance, hurried away to join his colleagues. The 
toad remained in his hiding place and peeked out of the guitar's sound hole. 
What elegance! What beauty! All the most beautiful birds of the world were 
there, talking, laughing, drinküig wine and nibbling on seeds. 

Soon the exhibitions of talents and skills commenced. The 
nightingales and the canaries sang selections from a German operetta, the 
flamingos and swallows presented Spanish folk dances, the eagles and the 
condors thrilled the guests with their aerial acrobatic feats and the parrots and 
parakeets told hilarious jokes between the various acts. 

"And now I am ready to sing a ballad accompanied by my guitar," 
announced the crow proudly. 

The toad froze with fear. "What will they do to me if I am 
discovered?" he thought, his little legs trembling. 

"No thank you, Mr. Crow," said the leader, a pompous peacock, 
"unfortunately there is no time for you now... because the dance begins!" 

The birds all applauded enthusiastically, as the pelican orchestra 



117 



stepped up; they tuned their instruments and began to play a tango. All the 
birds began to dance in a frenzy, and no one paid any attention to the 
disgruntled crow, who was grumbling to himself in a comer. 

The toad sighed with relief, and concentrated again on the spectacle. 
The music filled his little heart with happiness. Everyone danced to the beat 
of the music; the storks with the macaws, the flamingos with the toucans, the 
canaries with the finches, the eagles with the doves... What a fantasric party! 

Suddenly, without thinking, the toad jumped out of the guitar and 
joined the birds. He hopped from one foot to the other with the rhythm of 
the music. He danced with joyfiil, impressive agility and with wild 
enthusiasm as well; first with a nightingale, then with a stork, then with a 
parakeet... until he had been every bird's partner! The birds were enchanted 
with the tiny dancer, and as far the toad was concerned, well, it was an 
unforgettable evening! Occasionally he thought of his friend and worried 
about his anger if the crow discovered him at the birds' fiesta, and at those 
moments he attempted to hide himself from his bad-tempered fiiend's view. 

Finally the exhausted toad had to rest from dancing. He sat in a chair, 
panting, his little heart beating fast. All the birds gathered around him and 
applauded passionately. 

"How did you learn to dance so divinely?" asked a seagull. 

"How did you come to this fiesta without having any wings?" asked 
a parrot. 

"Do you have any brothers you could bring to the next party?" asked 
a finch. 

The toad felt it would be wise not to say anything. 

"Can you sing as well as you dance?" asked an owl. 

The toad could not resist the invitation. Like all the toads in the 
world, he loved to sing! He stood up and in his powerfiil voice, sang an 
ancient song of love and betrayal. The birds listened with tears in their eyes, 
and when the last notes faded away, the air reverberated with shouts of 
"Bravo! Bravo!" 

This noise brought the crow out of his melancholy reverie, and he 
joined the other birds to see who it was that entertained them so. 

How fiirious he felt when he discovered that the object of their 
admiration was none other than his earthbound friend, the toad! But how in 
the world had he arrived at this party in the sky? It suddenly dawned on the 
crow that the toad must have hidden himself inside his guitar. His heart 
filled with resentment, and he yearned for sweet revenge. He pushed himself 



118 



inside the circle of birds, and grabbed the hand of the frightened toad. 

"It is I who invited Mr. Toad to our fiesta because I knew of his 
immense musical talent," bed the crow with a big, false smile. "But it's 
getting late now, and his family will start worrying, so Toad and I must leave 
now. Goodbye!" 

He dragged the toad back to the guitar, stuffed him inside, and began 
the journey back to the land. 

"I really like your friends," said the toad, trying meekly to initiate a 
conversation. The crow continued flying, flapping his wings angrily, and 
chose not to respond. The toad began to feel a profound fear; perhaps the 
crow would want to pimish him in some way. . . but how? 

"Please forgive me, friend crow," said the toad, "I only hid in your 
guitar because I wanted to know what it's like to fly." 

"You want to know what it's like to fly?" screamed the crow, "Well, 
fine! I'll show you now!" And with that, the crow turned his guitar upside 
down, and the htüe toad fell out the hole and began to fall toward the distant 
earth. What terror he felt! He did not want to die! He tried to pray, but 
couldn't; he could only scream, "Aaaaaaaa!" 

After falling for what seemed an eternity, the toad struck the earth. 
He landed in the weeds near the pond and did not die, but the tiny sharp 
stones on the ground damaged his skin terribly. The poor toad's back was full 
of bruises and swollen cuts. It was too painful for him to hop, so he lay there 
on his back almost unconscious. The following morning an uncle discovered 
him there and carried him back to the pond. His family cared for him and 
treated him with pond algae, and, as his body slowly mended, the toad told 
them about his fantastic flight and about the fiesta of birds in the sky. Little 
by httle his wounds healed, but discolored splotches remained on his back, 
the same as those that the toads have that we know today. 

The flying toad became famous throughout the ponds of the world. 
Pilgrim toads traveled from faraway ponds to see the tiny adventurous hero, 
touch the ugly splotches on his back and hsten to the story of his incredible 
flight. 

Still today, all toads have splotches on their backs in order to honor 
and remember their brave ancestor. 

Although the frogs of the world have soft, smooth and vibrant skin, 
the spotted skin of the toads indicate their adventurous spirit and then- 
exceptional bravery. 




120 



ENGIalSfi TRANSLATIONS BF SQN6 LTRIGS 

1. The Soldier and the Lady (El soldado y la mujer) 



A young soldier driving was I 
When I saw her standing in the dark road 
I opened my window and she approached me 
And said, "Take me to the dance, please" 

She got into my car but spoke little 
I stared at her mystical eyes 
Her pale face enchanted me 
And together we went to the dance 



2. The Parrots Scream (Gritan los loros) 



All night I listen from my bed 

The noise, the chirping, the little melodrama 

I get angry and don't sleep all night 

I throw my clock and break the window 



Refrain: 



Refram: And I can't forget her happiness when she danced 
I can't forget the soft touch of that lady 



The modem music made her cry 
She couldn't bear the sounds and noises until 
The guitar began to play 
The music of yesterday 

We danced and danced together 
Until the hour the dance ended 
With the cold of the night her body frembled 
And I covered her with my mihtary jacket 

Refrain 

I wanted to leave her at her house, but no 
She made me leave her in the dark road 
So alone and sad that I felt sorry 
And so I left her with my mihtary jacket 

I retxuned to see her, an old lady saw me 
I described the woman and the old lady cried 
She took me to the graveyard and - what a shock! 
On the gravestone lay my mihtary jacket 



The parrots scream - Why do they scream so much 
Without making any sense? 
The parrots talk - Why do they talk so much 
Of gossip - not of truths? 

Chipi chipi rácasu Quiri papa tócanu 
Pretty at first, and ugly afterwards 
Chipi chipi rácasu Quiri papa tócanu 
Pretty at first, and ugly afterwards 



The sun comes, the bell rings 

But I'm sleepy all morning 

When I close my eyes, a voice proclaims 

"The song of the parrots remains fixed [in the mind] always" 

Refrain 

You never hsten, but you talk and talk 
You never understand, but you always repeat 
You get excited and wave your hands 
You ahnost seem to grow a beak and wings 

Refrain 




121 




3. Weave me something of wool (Téjeme algo de lana) 



Weave me something of wool 

A coat or a blue sweater 

For the cold of winter weave it lovingly 

A coat or a blue sweater 

Weave me something of wool 
A coat that everyone should admire 
In order to protect me please make me 
A coat that everyone should admire 




4. El Sombrerón 



The beautiful Celina didn't eat 

She didn't want to work nor get up in the morning 

And her poor parents worried 

Of the witchcraft that transformed her this way 



Refrain: 



Refrain: You weave and you wove, now you are weaving 

You always have woven, and always will you weave 
You wove when you were young day after day 
And everyday you want to weave more and more 



El Sombrerón he's a flirt 
El Sombrerón he's a curse 
El Sombrerón the daughters must be guarded 
From his song 



El Sombrerón he's a flirt 
El Sombrerón he's a curse 
She who listens to his guitar 
Dies of passion 



Weave me something of wool 
While you weave I will not disturb you 

I'll brmg you your dnnks I'U bring you your meals 2 And the light of the moon touched her 



While you weave I will not disturb you 

Weave me something of wool 
Put on buttons and a cape also 
I will be your servant absolutely 
Put on buttons and a cape also 

Refrain 

When I was very young 

I consulted with a seamstress 

1 requested that she make me a flag 

But she wove me a coat 

I always wore my coat 

The winter no longer made me cold 

My body grew it was agony 

One winter when it didn't fit me anymore 



It was reflected in her eyes and in her hair also 

Through the open window she listened 

To the voice that sang to her, "My love, come" 

Refrain: 

Although you may try to protect your daughter, father 

And mother, although you may want to lock her up 

You can't avoid the light of the moon 

Lxjve comes 

With all of it's pain 

To confuse the heart, el Sombrerón 

3. The beautiful Cehna passed away 

Without el Sombrerón she didn't want to exist 
El Sombrerón now has weeping in his song 
For love and it's power of destruction 





5. Margarita Pareja's blouse (La camisa de Margarita Pareja) 



She had a moimtain of dresses 

And from her fingers sparkled rings 

Of - esmeralds and pearls They always tell me 

He only had one pair of shoes 

Two pairs of pants - both of them inexpensive 

And - one old belt And they always say - 




Refrain: Suddenly in the road perhaps it was destiny 

The two of them discovered each other and their hearts fused together 

In a single instant from then on 

Their love brought to them compassion and happiness 



2. She studied French in Paris 
And traveled to every country 

In - North and South America They always tell me - 

He worked resolutely 

Day afler day in his poor comer 

In - the beautiful city of Lima And they always say 



Refrain (Descant - high voices) 

3; "Don't be foolish, please, Margarita! - It is more expensive than 

Forget Luis - the passion will leave you!" The [wedding] shirt of 

GDunseled her parents They always tell me - Margarita 
"She is pretty, it's true, my nephew, Pareja 
But she is rich, and you're a peasant - 

And - for this reason you two will never be happy!" And they always say - 
Refrain 

4. The two of them married - it was a wedding with a mass 
The bride wore a lovely shirt ' 
With - threads of gold and silver And now I say - 
The years passed - the shirt now is mine 
A lovely memory of my family 
Of - Margarita and Luis - my grandparents 




123 



7. £1 Caipora 



6. The Gypsy's Song (El canto de la gitana) 



Pass through the curtains to the darkness of my place 
Sit down and ask me of your future and of the truth 
Listen well to my suggestions With my voice I will save you 
Lies, jokes, reahties, my secret - only I know 

Refrain: I'm the mysterious gypsy woman, worldly vagabond 
My look is powerful and my voice universal 

2. I suggest that you always treat the spiders with affection 
I advise you to give alms to the old lady in the comer 

I counsel you not to marry with your love in the month of May 
I recommend that you do not travel to the mountains by horse 

Refrain 

3. They come from the mountains and from valleys to consult me 
The rich from their mansiones and the poor [come] to beg me 
The Christians, the Moors, the princes, the servants 

The old and embittered, the young and innocent 

Refi^ 




Refrain: 

In the branches, el Caipora 
Landlord of the forest and protector 
The omnipotence of his presence 
Fills every tree, every flower 
In the grasses, el Caipora 
Father of the Mountain and conductor 
Through water, air, land and blood 
He judges his world ferverently 

Toño, Toño, Toño worked in the forest 
Worked in the forest never ceasing 
Toño respected the plants and animals 
Toño respected the natural jewels 
Toño didn't cut down the tropical trunks 

The Caipora came - Toño looked at him 
Sparks in his eyes - Toño trembled 
Oh, what a fright! He stammered a prayer 
The Caipora let him escape 

Refrain 

Chico, Chico, Chico worked in the forest 
Worked in the forest never ceasing 
Chico did kill the plants and animals 
Chico did rob the natural jewels 
Chico did cut the tropical trunks 

The Caipora came - Chico looked at him 
Sparks in his eyes - Chico smiled 
Oh! What a surprise! He offered his pipe 
The Caipora turned him into a ghost 

Refrain 





124 



8„ La Magnolia 



High melody: 

Come, look at the flower 
Beautiful the flower 
White, soft and dehcate the flower 
Come, look at the flower 
Beautiful the flower 
The petals of velvet 

Fragile it is. But strong is 
It's fragrance in the memory' (2X) 

Ix)w melody: 

Strong armies are always celebrated 
Lovely poems are always written 
Bragging of the bloody wars and battles 
Tall sculptures are always erected 
Theatrical works are always composed 
Honoring triumphant generals 

But the best - the greatest conqueror 
Is only love - shnply it is love (2X) 

Between countries there are competitions 
Between teams there are exhibitions 
Showing the world their invincible feats 
Between families there are arguments 
Between neighbors there are altercations 
Disputing the friendships of their children 

But the best - the greatest conqueror 
Is only love - simply it is love (2X) 



All: 



Love always eternal love 
Love is the fragrance the immortal fragrance 






125 




Let's Plant a Flower 

(Plantaremos una flor) 



Let s plants a flower in our garden 
Let's plant a flower although it may be small 
Let's plant a flower - the color isn't important 
Let's plant a little flower - little! 

1 . We will pick a rose - 1 don't want any other thing 
We will pick a rose for our garden 

2. We will pick a prickly pear flower - later we'll eat it 
We will pick a prickly pear flower for our garden 

3. We will pick a carnation because it smells of honey 
We will pick a carnation for our garden 

Extra verses: 

4. We will pick a marigold - we'll put more in the balcony 
We will pick a marigold for our garden 

5. We will pick a zinnia - it will bloom until autumn 
We will pick a zinnia for our garden 




10. The Toad and his Song 

(El sapo y su canción) 

Refrain: Jip Jip jip Listen 

To the toad and his song! 
From the stone in the pond 
Singing to the world 
The toad and his song 

1 . The crow has a guitar 

Pero I'm more popular than him 

The crow has a guitar 

And I'm more popular than him 

2. The crow's voice is hoarse and ugly 
And I'm more popular than him 
The crow's voice is hoarse and ugly 
And I'm more popular than him 

3. The crow flies and I only hop 
But I'm more popular than him 
The crow flies and I only hop 
And I'm more popular than him 

4. The CTOw is foolish and I am clever 
And I'm more popular than him 
The crow is foolish and I am clever 
And I'm more popular than him 

Extra verse: 

5. The crow is sleek and I am spotted 
But I'm more popular than him 
The CTOW is sleek and I am spotted 
And I'm more popular than him 




Glossaries 

Spanish-English 
English-Spanish 



Glosario - Leyendas con canciones 
español - inglés/Spanish - English 



128 



A 



ablandarse 

abrazar 

abrigo, el 

absoluto, en 

absurdo 

abundancia, la 

aburrido/a 

acantilado, el 

acercarse 

acomodarse 

acompañar 

acordarse 

acorde, el 

acueducto, el 

adelgazarse 

admiración, la 

adorno, el 

advertir 

afilado 

afinar 

afligido/a 

agachar(se) 

agarrar 

agonizante 

agotado 

agua potable, el 

agudo(a) 

águila, el 

agujero, el 

aire, el 

ajeno/ a 

ajetreado 

alas, las 

alegría, la 

algas marinas, las 

alita, la 

aliviar, aliviado 
alivio, el 
alma, la 
almacén, el 
almohada, la 
altercación, la 
amanecer (del sol) 



soften, to 
embrace, to 
coat 

absolutely not 
absurd 

abundance ,plenty 

boring 

chff 

approach 

be comfortable 

accompany, to 

remember, to 

accord, agreement 

aqueduct 

become thin 

admiration 

decoration 

notice, observe, to 

sharp 

tune, to 

afflicted 

bend, to 

grasp, grab, to 

in agony 

exhausted 

water, drinking 

sharp 

eagle 

hole 

air 

distant 
bustling 
wings 
joy 

marine algae 

wing (litde) 

ease, to, reheved 

relief 

soul 

store 

pillow 

argument 

sunrise 



amontonar 
anciana, la 
anfibio, el 
angustiadamente 
anhelo, el 
animar 
anoche 
anochecer, el 
anonado 
anterior 

anticipación, la 
anticipado, por 
anticuado 
apagar 
aparencia, la 
aparición, la 
apasionado 
apellido, el 
a pesar de 
aplomo, el 
apretón, el 
araña, la 
árbol, el 
arpegio, el 
arrodillarse 
arrogante 
arroyo, el 
artesanía, la 
asistir 
asoleado 
asombrado 
asombro, el 
ásf)ero(a) 
asunto, el 
asustar 
atacar 
atemorizar 
aterrorizado 
atesorar 
atraído 
atrevirse 
aumentar 
ausencia, la 



gather, to 

old woman 

amphibian 

distressed 

yearning, longing 

encourage, to 

last night 

dusk, nightfall 

overwhelmed 

previous 

anticipation 

in advance 

old-fashioned 

extinguish, to 

vision 

apparition 

passionate 

surname 

in spite of 

poise 

handshake 

spider 

tree 

arpeggio 

kneel 

arrogant 

stream 

handicrafts 

help, assist, to 

sunny 

amazed 

astonishment 

harsh 

subject 

frighten, to 

attack, to 

frighten, to 

terrified 

treasure, to 

attracted 

dare, to 

grow, to 

absence 



129 



3\ HIIZHT 


axX\ dllCC 


CdlllHJ' d 


warm, hot 


HVC, cl 


nuíi 


caliente 


hot 


3\'cnUira, 1h 


adx enture 


callado 


silent 


Hvcr^jon/ado 


embarras sed 


cambiar 


change, to 


'J \/ 1 tT\"J 1 il 

aVl^lio, Id 


wasp 


L-dlllllldl 


walk, to 






/ ' 't rii tn'tttt 1 11 
Cdlllllldld , Id 


walk, long 






camino, cl 


road 


n 




i'HiTiica /If* n^witt la 
LdllUdd UC llii>ld^d 


niiudj Mini 






camf>o dc trigo, cl 


wheat Held 


ifallal 111, i-1 


UdJlLVl 


^dllll/\^>dlll\J, Cl 


cciiicici y 


bdilc, cl 


dance 


canal, el 


canal 


UoJU' a 


low 


LdJldllU, Cl 


canary 


balbucear 


stammer, to 


cansadi)/a 


tired 


bandada, la 


HOCK 


capturar 


capture, to 


barco de vela, cl 


sailboat 


capucha, la 


hocxl 


bamo, cl 


neighborhood 


cara, la 


face 


llaVaHay la 


battle 


í'aramMario í*\ 

Cdl dllll'dllW, Cl 


ic>cle 


bello/ a 


bcautiiul 


carbón, cl 


cnarcoal 




I/CIIC V uiv-lll 


CdlCdJdLMi uC lldd,ld 


laiKTritpr oiilrtiirct 
ldUL,IliCl \JUlt.lUlol 


besar 


kiss, to 


carga, la 


load 


bobo 


SlUlflU, IvXJllSIl 


cargo de, a 


in charge ol 


rwvn 1 ct 
injvd, la 


mol if n 

IllwliUl 


Cdl ICld, Id 


lUUCll, CdlCd3 


rWWl Q 1 ^ 

(nJUd, Id 




caro/ a 


C AUCllM V c 


bcHidadoso 




carretera, la 


road 


bcHtlado 


cmbroi dertd 


casa dc huéspedes 


boarding house 


bordado , cl 


embroiderer' 


casarse 


marry, to 


bosque, el 


forest 


castigar 


punish, to 


bolón, el 


button 


casualidad, por 


by chance 


bramido, cl 


roar, howl 


casucha de adobe 


adobe shack 


brillar 


SlllllC, SUdlKlC, lO 


/^oiicri Ira 
CdUSd, Id 


CdliSC 


UllUVdl 


injuiicc, ivi 


t"^l 1 t«^I i~\Cf'\ 

CdUlClOS(J 


CdULll.Jlld 


bnndar 


ofler, to 


cautivado 


attracted 


brisa, la 


breeze 


celda, la 


ecu 


brotar 


bring forth, to 


celestial 


heavenly 


bruja, la 


witch 


cementerio, el 


CClllClCl J 


burlarse 


make fun of, to 


cercano 


near, close 


busca, en 


in search for 


cesar 


stop, to 


buscar 


look for, to 


chacjueta militarj^ 


1X1111 UU y JaCKCl 


UUMJllCUd, Id 


cparfn in \ 

dCiUCll \fi/ 


f harpo pI 

ClidlCU, Cl 


mirlHIp rv^ol 

L/UCIUIC, LAJWl 






chillar 


scjueak, to 






chillón/ a 


snnii 






chimenea, la 


ciiiiiiiicy 






chic^uitín 


liny 


ca Dali eroso 


t^nt \j ol fi^i 1 1? 
Clll V dll OUd 


CLllSlllCdl 




CdUdllVJ, Cl 




CllldlC, Cl 


joke 


caber 


fit 


ciego 


blind 


cabeza, la 


head 


ciclo, el 


heaven, sky 


cacto, el 


cactus 


cigüeña, la 


stork 


caer(se) 


fall, to 


cintura, la 


waist 



130 



cinturón, el 
ciudad, la 
claror de luna, el 
clavado/a 
clavar 

clavar la vista 
clavel, el 
clavelón, el 
coche, el 
codiciado 
colchón, el 
colgado 
colina, la 
collar de plata, el 
colmar 
colmillo, el 
comentar 
compasivo 
confesar 
confianza, la 
confiarse 
confundir 
congelar 
conjunto, el 
conquistar 
conseguir 
conspiración, la 
constante 
construir 
contener 
contentarse 
contundir 
convento, el 
convertirse 
coquetón, el 
corazón, el 
cordialidad, la 
cordón, el 
cortar 
cortes, los 
corteza, la 
costurera, la 
creencia, la 
criado, el 
cristalizado(a) 
crueldad, la 
cruzar 
cuadrado, el 
cubrir 



belt 
city 

moonlight 
stuck, precise 
fixate, to 
piercing look 
carnation 
marigold 
car 

greedy 
mattress 
hanging 
hill 

silver collar 
overwhelm 
canine tooth 
comment, to 
compassionate 
confess, to 
confidence 
confide, to 
conl'use, to 
freeze, to 
group 
conquer, to 
obtain, to 
conspiracy 
constant, steady 
build, to 
contain, to 
satisfied, to be 
bruise, to 
convent 

turn into . . ., to 

nirt(«) 

heart 

courtesy 

cord, braid 

cut, to 

cuts, bruises 

baik 

seamstress 
behef 
servant 
cristallyzed 
cruelty 
cross, to 
square 
cover, to 



cuello, el 
cuerpo, el 
cuervo, el 
cueva, la 
cuidar 



D 

daño, hacer 

darse cuenta 

de modo que 

de repente 

debiütarse 

dedo, el 

delgado 

dehcadeza, la 

demostrar 

deprimido 

derretir 

desacuerdo, el 

desaparecer 

descolorido 

desconcertado 

desconsolado 

descubrir 

desdichado 

deseo, el 

desesperación, la 

desesperarse 

desgraciado 

desmayado 

desmorahzado 

desnudo(a) 

despachar 

despedirse 

despensa, la 

despertar 

desprecio, el 

destello, el 

destreza, la 

destrozado 

destruir 

desvanecer 

detener 

devorar 

diario, a 

dicho, el 

dignidad, la 



neck 
body 

crow, raven 
cave 

take care of, to 



damage, to 

realize, to 

in a way that 

suddenly 

weaken, to 

finger, toe 

thin 

dehcacy 

demonstrate 

depressed 

thaw, melt, to 

mi sunders tanding 

disappear, to 

discolored 

disoriented 

disconsolate 

discover, to 

unfortunate 

desire 

desperation 

become desperate 

unfortunate 

faint,unconscious 

demoralized 

bare 

sell, to 

say goodbye, to 

pantry 

wake up, to 

contempt 

sparkle 

skill 

destroyed 
destroy, to 
vanish, disappear 
detain, stop 
devour, to 
daily 

expression 
dignity 



131 



divertirse 

dolor de cabe/ü, el 

dolor, el 

duda, la 

dueño, el 

dulce 

durar 

duro 



E 

ejército, el 

elote, el 

emanar 

emoción, la 

empequeñecer 

empezar 

emplumado 

en plena marcha 

enamorarse 

encadenado 

encaje, el 

encantador(a) 

encantar 

encaramado 

encerrar 

encolerizado 

encuentro, el 

enfermo 

enfriarse 

engaño, el 

engañosamente 

enloquecido 

enojarse 

enojo, el 

enredadera, la 

enseguido/a 

entablar 

enterrar 

entregar 

entrenamiento, el 
entrenar 
entretener 
envenenado 
envidia, la 
é|x>ca, la 
equijK), el 
equivocarse 



have a go(xl time 
headache 
pain 
doubt 
owner 
sweet 
last, to 
hard 



regiment 
ear of com 
originate, to 
emotion 
belittle, to 
begin, to 
feathered 
in full swing 
fall in love, to 
chained 
lace 

enchanting 
charm, to 
top, on 
lock up, to 
angr> 
meeting 
ill 

freeze, to 
deceit 
deceitful 
crazy, maddened 
become annoyed 
anger 

climbing vine 
following 
board up, to 
bury, to 
dehver, to 
training 
train, to 
entertain, to 
poisoned 
jealousy, envy 
epoch, time 
team 

make mistake, to 



errar 

esbelto/a 

escala, la 

escalofrío, el 

escapar 

esconder 

escondite, el 

escuchar 

esculpí do(a) 

esfuerzo, el 

espalda, la 

espanto, el 

espantoso 

especie, la 

espectral 

esperanza, la 

esperanzado 

espeso 

espía, el 

esplendido 

esposa, la 

espuela de plata, la 

estatura, la 

estremecer 

estnbillo, el 

estupefacto 

eternidad, la 

excedir 

exigir 

expectante 

exponer 

extender 

extrañar 



F 

fallar 
fallecer 
falsedad, la 
fantasía, la 
fantasma, el 
fascinado/a 
fatídico 
fatigado 
fealdad, la 
felicidad, la 
feroz 
fervor, el 



wander, to 

sleek, slender 

scale {musical) 

shiver 

escape, to 

hide, to 

hiding place 

listen 

carved 

effort 

back n 

shock 

terrifying 

species 

ghostly 

hope 

hopeful 

thick, greasy 

spy 

splendid 
wife 

silver spur 
stature 
tremble, to 
refrain 

dumbfounded 
eternity 
exede, to 
demand, to 
expectant 
display, to 
extend, to 
miss, to 



fail, to 
die, to 
falsehood 
fantasy 

ghost, phantom 

fascinated 

fateful 

tired 

ugliness 

hapjpiness 

fierce 

fervor 



festejar 


celebrate, to 


figura, la 


figure 


figurarse 


depict, to 


fijarse en 


notice, to 


fingir 


fake, to 


llanta, la 


flute 


flecha, la 


arrow 


noreado(a) 


flowery 


florecer 


blossom, to 


fondo, el 


depth 


fortuna, la 


fortune, fate 


frágil 


fragile 


fragrancia, la 


fragrance 


frase, la 


phrase 


frenesí, la 


frenzy 


frenético/a 


frantic 


fuente, la 


spring, fountain 


fuerte 


strong 


fumar 


smoke, to 


fundir 


fuse, merge, to 


furor, el 


fury 


G 




ganar dinero 


make money, to 


gastar 


spend, to 


gemir 


moan, to 


gitano, el 


gypsy 


gobernar 


govern, to 


golondrina, la 


swallow 


golpe, el 


stroke, blow 


golpear 


strike a blow, to 


gordo 


fat, obese 


gorra, la 


cap 


gota de agua, la 


drop of water 


gozar 


enjoy 


gracia, la 


grace 


grano, el 


grain 


graznar 


croak, cackle 


grotesco/a 


grotesque 


grueso 


thick, bulky 


guacamayo, el 


macaw 


guapo 


handsome 


guardarropas, el 


wardrobe 


guerra, la 


war 


guerrero, el 


warrior 


guiar 


guide, to 



H 



habitación, la 


home 


hacienda, la 


ranch 


hambre, la 


hunger 


hazaña, la 


exploit, feat 


hechicera 


bewitching 


helécho, el 


fern 


herida, la, herido 


injury, injured 


hermana, la 


sister 


hennosura, la 


beauty 


hierba silvestre, la 


weed (uncultivate 


hilo, el 


thread 


hinchar 


swell, to 


hogareñoa 


housekeeping 


hoguera, la 


fireplace 


hoja, la 


leaf, blade 


hombre de negocio, el 


businessman 


hombro, el 


shoulder 


honrar 


honor, to 


horrorizado 


horrified 


huérfano, el 


orphan 


hueso(s), el, los 


bone(s) 


huir 


11 ee, to 


húmcdo(a) 


humid 


humilde 


humble 


humillante 


humiliating 


hurtadillas, a 


on the sly 


I 

iglesia, la 


church 


iluminar 


light up 


imaginación, la 


imagination 


tncansadamente 


untiringly 


incapaz 


incapable 


incrédulo 


incredulous 


increíble 


incredible 


indiferencia, la 


indifference 


indignación, la 


indienation 


infecundo/a 


barren 


ingenio 


naive 


inhóspito 


inhospitable 


iniciar 


start, initiate, to 


inmenso 


immense 


imnóvil 


immobil 


inolvidable 


memorable 



133 



inquieto 
inscripción, la 
insistir 
insoportable 
intentatmentc 
intrigado, estar 
invadir 
invernal 
invertido 
invierno, el 
invitado, el 
isla, la 
isla, la 

J 

jactar 

jadear 

jamás 

jardín, el 

jarra de miel, la 

joven 

joya, la 

jugoso 

juguetón 

juramento, el 

L 

lago, el 
lágrima, la 
lana, la 
lápida, la 
lástima, la 
lealdad, la 
lechuza, la 
leñador, el 
libertad, la 
listo/a 
liviano/a 
llanto, el 
llegada, la 
llenar 

llevar a cabo 
llorar 
lobo, el 
Ion to real, el 



anxious, womed 

inscription 

insist, to 

insult erable 

intensivel) 

intngued, to be 

invade, to 

winter)' 

inverted 

winter 

guest 

island 

island 



boast 

pant, to 

never 

garden 

jar of honey 

young 

jewel 

juicy 

playful 

oath 



lake 
tear 
wool 

tombstone 
pity 
loyalty 
owl 

woodcutter 

liberty 

clever 

light 

weeping 

arrival 

fill, to 

take place 

cry, to 

wolf 

little parrot 



luchar 
lucir 
lugar, el 
luna, la 



M 

machete, el 
macizo/a 
madera, la 
madnigada, la 
magnífico 
maldición, la 
malhumorado 
mancha, la 
manchado a 
mandato, el 
manejar 
manto, el 
m;ira\illar 
marbete, el 
marchar 
mariposa, la 
marisma, la 
marrón 
masa, la 
matar, matado 
matrimonio, el 
meditabundo/a 
meditar 
mejilla, la 
mensaje, el 
mentir 
mentira, la 
mérito, el 
meta, la 
mezcla, la 
miel, el 
milagro, el 
mirada, la 
místico/a 
mochila, la 
molestar 
monja, la 
mono, el 
moño, el 
monstruoso/a 



fight, to 
shine, lo 
place 
moon 



cane, knife 
solid, massive 
wood 
dawn 

magnificent 
curse, oath 
bad hunK)red 
spot, stain 
spotted 
command 
drive, to 
mantle, cloak 
marvel 
label 

march, to 

butterfly 

swamp 

maroon 

dough 

kill, to / killed 

husband and wife 

meditative 

meditate, think.to 

cheek 

message 

lie, to 

lie (n) 

merit, value 

goal 

mixture 

honey 

miracle 

glance 

mystical 

sack, knapsack 

bother, to 

nun 

monkey 
bow of ribbon 
monstrous 



134 



monte, el 


woods, forest 


orgullo, el 


jnde 


montón d 


pile, heap 


nroiill nsaTTipnf p 


Tirol 1 ni V 


moretón, el 


black&blue mark 


origen, el 


origin 


morir 


die, to 


oscuro, obscuro 


daik 


moro, el 


Moor 






mostrador, el 


counter 


P 




mozo, el 


young man 






muchedumbre, la 


crowd 


paisaje, el 


landscap)e 


muerte, la 


death 


pájaro my na, el 


m>Tia bird 


muía de carga, la 


pack mule 


jjálido a 


pale 


mundial 


woridwide 


paloma, la 


dove, pigeon 






palpitante 


palpi tatins 






f)arar(se) 


stop, to 


N 




pared, la 


wall 






pasajera o, la,el 


passenger 


nacimiento, el 


birth 


pasión, la 


passion 


nadar 


swim to 


paso, el 


step 


nariz la 


nose 






negar 


refuse, to 


pata, la 


foot, paw 


nido, el 


nest 


pausa, la 


pause 


niebla, la 


cloud 


paz, la 


peace 


nieve, el 


snow 


p)echo, el 


chest 


niñez, la 


childhood 


pedir 


ask for, to 


noble, el 


nobleman 


pedregoso 


rock}' 


nopal, el 


prickly f>ear 




stick, to 


nuez, la 


nut 


pelea, la 


fight, battle 






pelear 


fight, to 






pehgroso 


dangerous 


O 




pelón(pelona) 


bald 






pena, la 


suffering 


obrero, el 


workman 


f)enetrante 


penetrating 


obscuridad, la 


darkness 


jjepino, el 


cucumber, pickle 


obstinado a 


obstinate 


pera, la 


near 


ocelote, el 


ocelot 


perceber 


observe, to 


ocultar 




jjérdida, la 


waste 


odiar, odio, el 


hate, to, hate (n) 


perdidosa 


lost 


cíender 


offend, to 


peregrino 


traveling 


oferta, la 


offer 


perezoso 


lazv' 


oficinista, el 


clerk 


periquito, el 


parakeet 


ofrecer 


offer to 


nprtpnpftPT 


belong, to 


ofrenda la 


nfffTino 


np^aHoí^a^ neso el 


heavy, weight 


ojalá 


God grant . . . 


f)étalo, el 


petal 


ojeras, la 


rings (under eyes) 


petición, la 


petition 


ojos, los 


eyes 


pezuña, la 


hoof 


ola, la 


wave 


pico, el 


beak 


oler 


smell, to 


pie, a 


on foot 


olvidar 


forget, to 


piedra(s), la, las 


rock(s) 


omnipotente 


omnipotent 


piel, el 


skin 


caldear 


wave 


pierna, piemita, la 


leg, little leg 



135 



pino, el 

pintoresco 

pinzón, el 

pipa de fumar, la 

pipa, la 

pisar 

pista de baile, la 
pista, la 
placer, con 
planear 
plantación, la 
plantar 
platicar 
platinado 
playa, la 
pluma, la 
plumaje, el 
poder, el 
poder, el 
poderoso 
podndo 
pollo, el 
polvoriento 
portal, el 
posar 
poseer 
precedido 
premeditación, la 
preocuparse 
presentir 
prestar 
príncipe, el 
principio, al 
profecía, la 
jjTometer 
propósito, a 
propósito, el 
prosperar 
próspero 
protección, la 
[HDteger 
protesta, la 
provenir 
pueblo, el 
puerta, la 
pulir 
pulsante 
pimtería, la 
pimtilla, la 



pine tree 

picturesque 

finch 

pipe for smoking 
pipe (musical) 
step on, to 
dance step 
floor 

pleasure, with 

plan, to 

plantation 

plant, to 

chat, to 

silvery 

beach 

feather 

plumage 

fxjwer 

fxjwer 

jxjwerful 

rotten 

chicken 

dusty 

city gate 

perch, to 

own, possess, to 

fjreceding 

[jremeditation 

worry, to 

presentiment 

lend, to 

prince 

first, at 

prophesy 

promise, to 

on purpose 

purpose (n) 

prosper, to 

prosperous 

protection 

protect, to 

protest 

come, arise, to 

village 

door 

polish, to 
pulsating 
marksmanship 
tiptoe 



punzante 

Q 

quebrado/ a 
quemar 
quetzal, el 
quieto 

R 

raíz, la 

rama, la 

rana toro, la 

rascamoño, el 

real, el 

reahdad, la 

recámera, la 

recipiente, el 

recomendar 

reconocer 

recorKxido 

recostar, recostado 

recuperar 

reforzarse 

refugio, el 

regalo, el 

regañar 

regresar 

rehusar 

reina, la 

reino, el 

reír 

relámpago, el 
reojo, de 
resbalar 
resolución, la 
respetar 
respirar 

resplandeciente 
respuesta, la 
retorcer 
reunir 
rezar 
rezo, el 
rincón, el 
risa, la 



sharp, pricking 



broken 
bum, to 
quetzal (bird) 
quiet 



root 

branch 

bullfrog 

zinnia 

coin (Peru) 

reahty 

bedroom 

jar, container 

reconmiend, to 

recognize, to 

well-known 

lean back, rest 

recuperate 

reinforce 

refuge 

present, gift 

scold, to 

return, to 

refuse, to 

queen 

kingdom 

laugh, to 

lightning 

askance, sideways 

slide, skid, to 

resolution 

resf>ect, to 

breathe, to 

radiant 

answer 

twist, to 

assemble 

pray, to 

prayer 

comer 

smile 



136 



risueño 


smiling 


silbar 


whistle, lo 


ritmo, el 


rythm 


simpático 


pleasant 


rizado 


curly 


sirviente, el 


servant 


roble, el 


oak tree 


sitio, el 


place 


roca, la 


rock 


sobrevivir 


survive 


rodear 


surround, to 


sobnno, el 


nephew 


rodilla, la 


knee 


soleado 


sunny 


ronco/a 


hoarse 


sollozar 


sob, to 


ruido, el 


noise 


sollozo, el 


sob 


ruidoso 


noise 


solo a 


alone 


ruiseñor, el 


nightingale 


sonar 


sound, to 






soñar 


dream, to 


S 




sonreír 


smile, to 






soplar 


blow, to 


sabio 


wise 


sorprendido 


surprised 


sabroso 


tasty 


sótano de escondite, el 


hiding place 


sacar 


take out, to 


subir 


climb, to 


sacar ventajas 


take advantage 


suceder 


happen, to 


sacerdote, el 


priest 


sueño, el 


dream 


sacrificio, el 


sacrifice 


sufrimiento, el 


suffering 


saltar 


hop, jump, to 


sugerencia, la 


ad\'ice 


saludable 


healthy 


sugerir 


suggest, to 


saludar 


greet, to 


suplicante 


suppliant 


salvage 


wild, savage 


suphcar 


plead, to 


salvar 


save, to 


suspirar 


whisper, sigh. 


sanar 


heal, to 






sangre, la 


blood 


T 




sangriento 


bloody 






sanguinario 


bloodthirsty 


talón, el 


heel 


sapo, el 


toad 


tambalear 


stagger, to 


satisfacer 


satisfy, to 


tarea, la 


task, job 


seco/a 


diy 


tejer 


knit, to 


secreto, el 


secret 


telaraña, la 


spider web 


sed, la 


thirst 


temblar 


tremble, to 


seductor/a 


tempting 


temer 


fear, to 


seguir 


continue, to 


temeroso 


fearful 


seguir al piso 


follow along, to 


tempestad, la 


storm 


selva, la 


jungle 


temporada, la 


season 


semilla, la 


seed 


terciopelo, el 


velvet 


señal, el 


sign 


tesorar 


treasure, to 


señas, hacer 


signal, flag down 


tienda, la 


store 


sendero, el 


footpath 


tiemo/a 


tenderly, soft 


sensibilidad, la 


sense 


tierra, la 


earth 


sensual 


sensuous 


tierra, la 


land, country 


ser, el 


being (n) 


tinieblas, las 


darkness 


serenata, la 


serenade 


tobillo/s 


ankle(s) 


serpiente, la 


snake 


tocar ( instrumento) 


play, to 


siglo, el 


century 


tonto/a 


foolish, stupid 



137 



toque, el 
lorbcllino, el 
torpe 

torlillería, la 
traicionar 
traje de boda, la 
traje de v aquero,el 
trampa, la 
triste, tristeza, la 
tronco, el 
trueno, el 
tucán, el 

U 

ubicado 
uña, la 
urgencia, la 



vacío/a 
valentía, la 
valer 
valiente 
valorar 
vals, el 
vencer 
veneno, el 
venganza, la 
verdad, la 
verdura, la 
vereda, la 
verruga, la 
vestido, el 
víbora, la 
vibrar 
vida, la 
viento, el 
vincular 
vivace 
volar 
voltearse 
voluntad, la 
volver 
voz, la 

vuelo de regreso, el 



touch 
whirlwind 
clumsy 
tortilla factory 
betray, to 
bridal gown 
cowboy outiit 
trick 

sad, sadness 
trunk (tree) 
thunder 
toucan 



situated, to be 
nail, toenail 
urgency 



empty 
valor 
value, to 
brave 

treasure, to 

waltz 

defeat, to 

poison 

vengeance 

truth 

vegetables 

path 

wart 

dress 

viper 

vibrate, to 

Ufe 

wind 

tie, unite, to 
vivid, lively 
fly, to 

turn around, to 
will n 
return, to 
voice 
return trip 



yerno, el 



zona rocosa 



son-in-law 



rcxky terrain 



138 

Glossary - Leyendas con canciones 
English - Spanish/inglés - español 



A 




attack, to 


atacar 






attempt, to 


intentar 


a lot 


mucho 


attend, to 


asistir 


abide, to 


cumplir con 


attract, to 


atraír 


absence 


ausencia, la 


await, to 


esfjerar 


abundance .plenty 


abundancia, la 


awake, to be 


estar despierto 


accompany, to 


acompañar 


aware, to be 


enterarse de 


accumulate, to 


acumular 






aching 


doloros 


B 




adjust, arrange, to 


arreglar 






admiration 


admiración, la 


back n 


espalda, la 


admit, to 


admitir 


backpack 


mochila, la 


adobe shack 


casucha de adobe 


bad-humored 


malhumorado 


adore, to 


adorar 


baffled 


perplejo 


advance, to 


avanzar 


bald 


f)elón(f)elona) 


advise, to, advice 


aconsejar, consejo 


ballad 


balada, la 


aim, to 


apuntar 


balsam wood 


madera de bálsamo 


air 


aire, el 


bare 


desnudo(a) 


alert 


listo 


barely 


escasamente 


alleviate, to 


aliviar 


bark 


corteza, la 


almost ready 


casi listo 


base 


base, la 


alone 


solo/a 


battle 


batalla, la 


altar 


altar, el 


be comfortable 


acomodarse 


amazed 


asombrado 


beach 


playa, la 


amount 


cantidad 


beak 


pico, el 


ancient 


antiguo 


beat, pound, to 


machucar 


anger, angrj' 


enojo, el, enojarse 


beautiful 


beUo/a 


anguished 


angustiado 


beaut>' 


hermosura, la 


ankle(s) 


tobillo s 


become aimoyed 


enojarse 


aimoimce, to 


animciar 


become aware of 


enterarse 


answer 


respuesta, la 


become desperate 


desesperarse 


anticipation 


anticipación, la 


bedroom 


recámera, la 


antiquated 


anticuado 


beg, to 


rogar 


anxious 


ansioso 


begin, to 


empezar 


apparition 


aparición, la 


behind 


atrás, detrás de 


apprehension 


aprehensión, la 


being (noun) 


ente, el 


approach, to 


acercarse 


belief 


creencia, la 


army 


ejército, el 


belittle, to 


empequeñecer 


arrival, amve, to 


llegada, la, llegar 


bellow, to 


bramar 


arrow 


flecha, la 


belong, to 


pertenecer 


ascend, to 


subir 


bend, to 


agachar(se) 


ask for, to 


pedir 


bene\olent 


benévolo 


assemble 


retmir 


berr) 


grano 


astonished 


asombrado 


betray, to, betrayal 


traicionar, traición 


astonishment 


asombro, el 


bewildered 


desatinado 


astounded 


atónito(a) 


bewitching 


hechicera 



139 



bid liircwcll, to 


despedirse 


c 




birth 


nacimiento el 






blend /Í 


armonía la 


í'ílí'k'lf lo 


pharlíir f nparpiir 

VllcUlal, V^i/<tlV<U 


blind 


ciego 


cactus 


papio 1*1 

VdVlvl, VI 


blissi ul 


feli/. 


calni down, to 


calmarse 


bloodthirsty 


sanguiniirio 


can't help . . . 


no hay remedio 


bloody 


sangriento 


cancel, to 


obliterar 


blossom to 


llorecer 


cane kiule 


tnarhpli» pl 

IIICIVIIVIV, VI 


blow to 


soplar 


^ di 11 11 V ii./dii 


I'o 1 mi 1 1 o 1*1 


bl ush to 


sonrojarse 




in/v V vui , 1 <i 


boarding house 


casa de huéspedes 


cap 


gorra la 


bod}' 


cuerpo, el 


captivate, to 


capti var 


bod, to 


hervir 


capture, to 


encantar 


bonc(s) 


hueso(s), el, los 


care 1 or to 


cuidar 


border, edge 


onila la 


card ully 


pon piiiHíiHo 


bon ng 


aburrido 




Val 1 V L<l, Id 


bother to 


molestar 


carved 


í'*;pi il ni í\ci( a ^ 

v^viu Lfi vivíya f 


boulder 


pedrejón, el 


cause, to cause 


causa, la, causar 


bow of ribbon 


moño, el 


cautious 


cauteloso 


bow, to 


inclinar(se) 


cave 


cueva, la 


brackish 


salobre 


cease, to 


cesar, dejar de 


branch 


rama la 


cell 


celda la 


hravi* hravprv 


v a 1 1 í* n 1 í • fira v 1 1 r m 

* cu 1 \> 1 1 \\r , 1 /l el > 1.11 «1 


í*i*mí'tprv' 

w 1 1 IV IV 1 y 


pumnosanto pI 

vaiiiL/v/odiiiv/, VI 


hrpatht* to 


1 1^01.711 CU 


ce nlur}' 


SI tilo l'l 


nrpalnliiKintJ 

L Jl V <1 U J KIAJ 


1 m oorií' n t í* 


pnanop to 
viicui£,c, lyj 


Vdllll'l di 


breeze 


bnsa, la 


char, to 


quemar 


hndal <ihirt 


camisa de noviaja 


c har coal coal 


carbón el 


bright 


claro brillante 


charm to 


encantar 


hnniJ forth to 


brotar 


chat to 


platicar 


broad 


ancho 


cheek 


mejilla, la 


broken 


quebrado/ a 


checriul 


alegre 


brook 


arroyo, el 


cherish to 


acariciar 


bruise 


contusión la 


chest 


pecho, el 


KmiQp to 


r/^ntiifiHir<¡p 

V.A_/111.U11U11 OV 


chick 


pollito, el 


brush, to 


acepillar 


chicken 


jX)llo, el 


bruscjuely 


brusco rudo 


childhood 


niñez., la 


r\iiiH/i\7 1 
UlUMJy, -ICa 


r'amíiruHii **! /l ü 
L-ulllalaUa, Cl' la 


rhill in) 

ClUll \flf 


pspaloirío Pl 

VdVdlUlllU, ti 


HllilH to 
UUilU, lU 




pnimriPV 
V luiiiuv y 


phimpTiP^ 1^ 

viuiiivuvu, la 


hiillfroiJ 

If Ul 111 


rana toro el 


chivalrous 


caballeroso 


hurdai 


carga, la 


choose, to 


escoger 


bum to 


quemar 


church 


iglesia, la 


hiir^t to 


deshacerse 


city 


ciudad, la 


bury, to 


enterrar 


clatter, to 


moverse ruidosamente 


businessman 


hombre de negocio, el 


cleanse, to 


limpiarse, lavarse 


bustling 


ajetreado 


clench, to 


agarrar 


butterfly 


mariposa, la 


clerit 


oíicinisla, el 


button 


botón, el 


clever 


inteligente 


buy, to 


comprar 


cüff 


escarpa, la 



climb, to 
climbing viae 
cling, to 
cloak 
clothing 
cloud 
clumsy 
coat of arms 
coat, of fur 
cobblestone 
coin (Peru) 
collapse, to 
colorful 
command 
comment, to 
community 
compassionate 
complaint 
comply, to 
concerned, be 
confess, to 
confide, to 
confidence 
confused 
conquer, to 
consent, to 
console, to 
contain, to 
conünue, to 
convent 
cook, to 
cord, braid 
com on the cob 
comer 
counsel, to 
counter 
countless 
courtesy 
cover, to 
coveted 
cowboy outfit 
cresting 
cristaUyzed 
cross, to 
crow n 
aowd 
cry, to 
c unning 



subir 

enredadera, la 
pegarse 

capote, abrigo, el 
ropa 

niebla, la 
torpe 

escudo de armas, el 

abrigo, el, de pieles 

guijarro, el 

real, el 

desplomarse 

colorido 

mandato, el 

comentar 

comunidad, la 

compasivo 

queja, la 

conformarse 

tener interés 

confesar 

confiarse 

confianza, la 

COTifundido 

conquistar 

consentir en 

consolar 

contener 

seguir 

convento, el 

codnar 

cordón, el 

mazorca de maíz 

esquina, la 

aconsejar 

mostrador, el 

innumerable 

cordialidad, la 

cubrir, tapar 

codiciado 

traje de vaquero,el 

crestando 

cristalizado(a) 

cruzar 

cuervo, el 

muchedumbre, la 

Uorar 

astuto 



curiy 
curtain 
customer 
cut, to, cut n 



D 

daily 

damage, to 
dance 

dance floor 
dangerous 
dare, to 
dad; 

darkness 
dawn 
dazed 

fla77ling 

dead 

deafening 
death 
deceit 
deep 

defeat, to 
dehcacy 
dehver, to 
demand, to 
demeanor 
deny, to 
depart, to 
depict, to 
depressed, to be 
depth 

descend, to 

desert 

design 

desire 

desire 

despairingly 

desperation 

despicable 

destined 

destroy 

determiiKd 

devastated 

devious 

devour, to 



rizado 
cortina, la 
cliente, el 
cortar, corte, el 



diario, a 

daño, hacer 

baile, el 

pista de baile, la 

peligroso 

atrevirse 

obscuro 

obscuridad, la 

madrugada, la 

aturdid 

deslimibrante 

muerto(a) 

oisordecedor 

muerte, la 

engaño, el 

profundo 

vencer 

delicacía, la 

entregar 

exigir 

conducta, la 
negar 

salir, partir 
figurarse 
deprimido, estar 
fondo, el 
bajar, descender 
desierto, el 
diseño, el 
deseo, el 

desesperadamente 

desesijeración, la 

despreciable 

destinado 

destrozar 

determinado 

devastado 

desviado 

devOTsr 



141 



die, to 


morir 


edüc 


borde, el 


dignity 


dignidad, la 


cene 


espectral 


dilemna 


dilema, el 


elbow 


codo, el 


diligent 


diligente 


emanate, to 


emanar 


disappear, to 


desaparecer 


einbarrasment 


vergüenza, la 


discolored 


descolorado 


embrace, to 


abrazar 


disconsolate 


desconsolado 


embroidered 


bordado 


discover, to 


descubrir 


embroidery 


bordadura, la 


disgruntled 


disgustado 


emerge, to 


emerger 


disillusionment 


desengaño, el 


emotion 


emoción, la 


dismount, to 


desmontarse 


employ, to 


emplear 


disoriented 


desctHiccrtado 


empty 


vacío/a 


display, to 


exponer 


enchanted 


encantado 


dissipate, to 


disiparse 


enchanting 


encantadcH-(a) 


distant 


ajeno/ a 


encounter 


encontrar 


distressmg 


penoso angustioso 


encourage, to 


am mar 


disturb, to 


estorbar 


end, to 


terminar 


do a favor 


hacer un favor 


endless 


sin fin 


door 


puerta, la 


endure, to 


aguantar 


doubt, to doubt 


duda, la, dudar 


enemy 


enemigo, el 


dough 


masa, la 


enjoy, to 


disfrutar, gozar 


downtown 


en el centro 


ensuing 


siguiente 


drag, to 


arrastrar 


entertained 


entretenido 


drastic 


drástico 


entrance 


entrada, la 


draw closer, to 


acercarse 


envy, envious 


envidia, la, envioso 


dread, ti 


temer 


epoch, time 


época, la 


dream, to dream 


sueño, el, soñar 


escape, to 


escapar 


dress 


vestido, el 


eternity 


eternidad, la 


drinkable 


saludable 


everyone 


todos 


drive, to 


manejar 


evidence 


evidencia, prueba 


drop of water 


gota de agua, la 


evil 


malvado 


drop off, to 


dejar salir 


exede, to 


excedir 


droplet 


gotita, la 


exhausted, to be 


agotado, estar 


dry, to dry 


seco/a, secar 


expensive 


caro/ a 


duck meat 


carne de pato, la 


expression 


dicho, el 


dumbfounded 


estupeiacto 


extend, to 


extender 


dusk, nightfall 


anochecer, el 


extinguish, to 


apagar 


dusty 


polvoriento 


exuberant 


exuberante 


E 




eves 


ojos, los 


eagle 


águila, el 


F 




ear of com 


elote, el 


fabricate, to 


fabricar 


earth 


tierra, la 


face 


cara, la 


earthbound 


bajar de los nubes 


factory 


fábrica, la 


ease, to 


aüviar 


fade, to 


desvanecer 


easygoing 


comodón 


fail, to 


fallar 



fake, to 


fingjr 


fall asleep, to 


dormirse 


fall down, to 


caerse 


lall in love, to 


enamorarse 


fall, knock down 


tumbar 


loll, lO 


caer 


fang 


colmillo, el 


fantasy 


lantasia, la 


farm, to 


cultivar 


fascinated 


fascinado/a 


fit 
I at 


gordo 


lateiui 


fatídico 


ledx, lo, icariui 


temer, temeroso 


feariess 


intrépido 


icai 


hazaña, la 


feather 


pluma, la. 


feature 


característica, la 


field of grain 


camjx) de grano, el 


fierce 


feroz 


iigni. Dame 


pelea, la 


ngni, to 


luchar 


figure 


figura, la 


fill tr. 
1111, lO 


llenar 


linen 


pinzón, el 


linger, toe 


dedo, el 


fireplace 


chimenea, la 


firewood 


leña, la 


fist 


puño, el 


fit, to 


caber 


fixate, to 


clavar 


flag down, to 


dar señas 


fiap, to 


sacudir 


flee, to 


huir 


llOCK 


bandada, la 


flourish, to 


florecer 


flow, to 


fi..í«- 
lluir 


flowery 


floreado(a) 


IIUIC 


flauta, la 


fly, to (flew) 


volar, voló 


fog 


niebla, la 


fold, to 


doblar 


follow along, to 


seguir al piso 


following 


enseguido 


fool, foolish 


bobo, el, nécio 


foot, paw 


pata, la 


foothill 


colina, la 


footstep 


paso, el 


force, to force 


fuerza, la, forzar 



142 



foreign 


extranjero 


foremost 


primero 


forest 


bosque, el 


forget, to 


olvidar 


fortify, to, fortress 


fortificar, fortaleza 


fortune, fate 


fortuna, la 


fountain 


fuente, la 


fraction 


iraccion, la 


fragile 


frágil 


fragrance 


fragrancia, la 


freeze, to 


congelar 


frenzy 


frenesí, la 


trequently 


frecuentemente 


fright, frightened 


asusto, el,asustado 


frog 


rana, la 


fury 


furor, el 


fuse, to 


fundirse 






gallop, to 


galopar 


gather, to 


amontonar 


gentle 


manso, suave 


get thin, to 


enflaquecer 


ghost, phantom 


lantasma, el 


ghostly 


espectral 


giggle, to 


reírse bobamente 


give off, to 


emitir 


glance n 


mirada, la 


glance, to 


lanzar una mirada 


gleam, to 


destellar 


gleefully 


con alegría 


glisten, to 


brillar 


go to bed 


acostarse 


goal 


meta, la 


good-natured 


afable 


gossip, to, gossip/z 


chismear, chisme 


govern, to 


gobernar 


grab, to 


agarrar 


grace, graceful 


gracia, la, gracioso 


grass, pasture 


lllCl Ua, id 


tldVCl y 


grave 


gravestone 


lápida, la 


greedy 


codicioso 


greet, to 


saludar 


groceries, market 


mercado, el 


grotesque 


grotesco/a 



143 



ground 


tierra, la 


horrified 


horrorizado 


group 


conjunto, el 


horse 


caballo, el 


grow, to 


crecer 


hot 


cálido(a),caliente 


grumble, to 


gruñir 


hover, to 


fluctuar 


guest 


invitado(a) 


howl, to 


chillar 


guide, to 


guiar 


huge 


enorme 


gypsy 


gitano, el 


humble 


humilde 






humid 


húmedo(a) 






hunger 


hambre, el 


H 




hunk 


jjedazo grande, el 






husband and wife 


matrimonio, el 


handicrafts 


artesanía, la 






handshake 


apretón, el 


I 




handsome 


guapo 






hang, to, hanging 


colgar, colgado 


ice 


hielo, el 


happen to . . . 


por casualidad 


icicles 


carámbono(s), los 


hapf>en to notice 


darse cuenta 


ill 


enl'ermo 


happiness 


feUcidad, la 


illness 


enfermedad, la 


hard 


duro 


image 


imagen, la 


harm 


hacer daño 


imagination 


imaginación, la 


harsh 


áspero(a) 


in full swing 


en plena marcha 


hate, to hate 


odio, el, odiar 


in order to 


pard 


have a good time 


divertirse 


in search of 


en busca de 


have to do, to 


tener que hacer 


incapable 


incapaz 


bead 


cabeza, la 


incessantly 


sin cesar 


heal, to 


sanar 


incredible 


increíble 


heart 


corazón, el 


incredulous 


incrédulo 


heartbroken 


muerto de pena 


indifference 


indiferencia, la 


heaven, sky 


cielo, el 


ingredient 


ingrediente, el 


heavenly 


celestial 


inhospitable 


inhóspito 


heavy 


pesado(a) 


inscription 


inscripción, la 


heed, to 


hacer caso do 


insert, to 


insertar 


heel 


talón, el 


insist, to 


insistir 


help, assist, to 


asistir 


insolent 


insolente 


hem (n) 


borde, el 


intensively 


intentatmente 


herb 


hierba, la 


intrigued, to be 


intrigado, estar 


hide, to 


esccnderse 


invade, to 


invadir 


hiding cellar 


sótano de escondite 


inverted 


invertido 


hiding place 


escondite, el 


island 


isla, la 


hilarious 


regocijado 






hiU 


colina, la 


J 




hoarse 


ronco 






hde 


agujero 


jar of pickles 


recipiente de pepii 


home 


habitación, la 


jealous 


celoso 


hood 


capucha, la 


jealousy, envy 


envidia, la 


hoof 


pezuña, la 


jewel 


joya, la 


hop, to 


saltar 


joke 


chiste, el 


hope (n) 


esp)eranza, la 


journey 


viaje, el 



144 



jubilant 


jubilante 


load, to load 


carga, la, cargar 


juicy 


jugoso 


lock up, to 


encerrar 


jungle 


selva, la 


look for, to 


buscar 






lost, to lose 


perdido/a, perder 






lost in thought 


ensimismado 


K 




loud 


alto, ruidoso 






love, to be in 


enamorado, estar 


kill 


matar 


low 


bajo/ a 


kind 


bcmdadoso 


lowliest 


lo más bajo 


kind of 


uno a modelo de 


loyalty 


lealdad, la 


kingdom 


reino, el 


lug, to 


traer 


kiss, to 


besar 


lumpy 


borujoso 


knee 


rodilla, la 






kneel down, to 


arodillarse 






knit, to 


tejer 


M 




knock, to 


golpear 










macaw 


guacamayo, el 






mad 


furioso 


L 




magnificent 


magnífico 






make fim of, to 


burlarse 


label 


marbete, el 


make mistake, to 


equivocarse 


lace (n) 


encaje, el 


make money, to 


ganar dinero 


laden, to be 


cargado 


mandate 


mandato, el 


lake 


lago, el 


maimer 


manera, la 


land, to 


aterrar 


mansion 


palacio, el 


landscaf)e 


paisaje, el 


march, to 


marchar 


last, to 


durar 


marksmanship 


puntería, la 


late 


tarde 


maroon 


marrón 


laugh, to 


reír 


marry, to 


casarse 


laughter outburst 


carcajada de risasja 


marvel, to 


maravillar 


laughter, gales of 


tempestades de risas 


mask 


máscara, la 


lazy 


perezoso 


massive 


sólido, imponente 


leader 


jefe, el 


master 


patrón, el 


leaf, blade 


hoja, la 


matter 


asunto, el 


lean, to 


apoyarse en 


mattress 


colchón, el 


leap, to 


saltar 


meal 


comida, la 


leave, to 


salir 


mean, to 


quiere decir 


leaves n p 


hojas, las 


measure 


medida, la 


leg 


pierna, la 


meditate, think,to 


meditar 


lend, to 


prestar 


meekly 


manso, dócil 


liberty 


libertad, la 


meeting 


encuentro, el 


lie, to 


mentir, acostarse 


melt, to 


desvanecerse 


hfe 


vida, la 


memorable 


inolvidable 


light 


hgero(a) 


merit 


mérito, el 


lightning 


relámpago, el 


message 


mensaje, el 


listen, to 


escuchar 


messenger 


mensajero, el 


little parrot 


lorito real, el 


meticulous 


meticuloso 


hvid 


encolerizado 


midnight 


de medianoche 



145 



military jacket 

mind 

mindless 

miracle 

misfortune 

miss, to 

missing 

mist 

mistaken 
misty 

mi simderstanding 

mixture 

moan, to 

modest 

money 

monkey 

monstrous 

moon 

moonlight 

Moor 

motionless 

mottled 

mount, to 

mountain 

mourning 

mouth 

move, to 

mule 

murderous 
muscle 

N 

nail, toenail 

naive 

narrative 

neck 

necklace 

neglect, to 

neighbor 

neighborhood 

nephew 

nest 

never 



chaqueta militarja 
mente, la 
sin (jensar 
milagro, el 
desgracia, la 
extrañar 
desaparecido 
neblina, la, vapor 
equivcx:<tdo 
vaporoso 
desacuerdo, el 
mezcla, la 
gemir 
humilde 
dinero, el 
mono, el 
monstruoso/a 
luna, la 

claror de luna, el 
moro, el 
inmóvil 
moteado 
montar 
montaña, la 
luto, el 
boca, la 
mover 
muía, la 
sanguinario 
miísculo, el 



uña, la 
ingenio 
narrativa, la 
cuello, el 
collar, el 
descuidar 
vecino, el 
vecindad, la 
sobrino, el 
nido, el 
jamás, nunca 



nevertheless 
nibble, to 
nightingale 
nighttime 
nobleman 
nod, to 
noise, noisy 
nose 

notice, to 

nun 

nut 



O 

oak tree 

oath 

obey, to 

obliterate 

observe, to 

obstinate 

obtain, to 

offend, to 

offer (n),to offer 

oiTering 

old woman 

omnipotent 

on account of 

on foot 

on purpose 

on the sly 

on the verge of 

origin 

ornate 

orphan 

outside, outskirts 
overhear, to 
overpriced 
overwhelmed 
owe, to 
owner 



sin embargo 
picar 

mi señor, el 
nocturno, noche 
noble, el 
inclinar 

ruido, el, ruidoso 
nariz, la 
tomar cuenta de 
monja, la 
nue/., la 



roble, el 
juramento, el 
obedecer 
obliterar 
perceber 
os tinado 
conseguir 
ofender 

oferta, la, ofrecer 
ofrenda, la 
anciana, la 
omnipotente 
porque 
pie, en 
propósito, a 
hurtadillas, a 
a punto de 
origen, el 
florido 
huérfano, el 
afuera, afueras 
oír por casualidad 
precio demasiado 
anonado 
deber 
dueño, el 



p 




poise 
poisened 


aplomo, el 
envaaenado 


pain 


dolor, el 


poison 


veneno, el 


painful 


dolwido 


poke fun, to 


burlarse de 


pale 


pálido/a 


polish, to 


puhr 


palm 


palma, la 


pompous 


pomjxxio 


palpitating 


palpitante 


pond 


charca, la 


pant, to 


palpitar 


porch 


porche, el 


pantry 


despensa, la 


jxjwer 


poder, el 


parakeet 


periquito, el 


powerful 


poderoso 


parlor 


sala, la 


pray, to 


rezar 


parrot 


loro, el 


predict, to 


predichar 


partner 


compañero, el 


presence 


presencia, la 


party, parties 


fiesta, la 


present, gift 


regalo, el 


passenger 


pasajera/o, la,el 


pretend, to 


fingir 


passionate 


apasionado 


previous 


anterior 


path 


vereda, la,camino 


jjricetag 


tarjeta con precio 


peace, peacefully 


paz, la, en paz 


prickly peai cactus 


nopal, el 


peacock 


pavo real, el 


jMide 


orgullo, el 


pear 


pera, la 


priest 


sacerdote, el 


peek out, to 


mirar a hurtadillas 


prince 


príncipe, el 


peer, to 


fijar la vista 


prisoner 


prisionero, el 


penetrating 


penetrante 


procession 


procesión, la 


perceive, to 


{percibir 


projected 


resaltado 


perch, to 


posar 


promise, to 


prometer 


petal 


pétalo, el 


prophesy 


profecía, la 


petition 


petición, la 


prosper, to 


prosperar 


phrase 


frase, la 


prosperous 


próspero 


pickle jar 


recipiente de pepinos 


protect, to 


proteger 


picturesque 


pintoresco 


protest 


protesta, la 


pierce, lo 


penetrar 


proudly 


orgullosamente 


piercing look 


clavar la vista 


pulsating 


pulsante 


pile, heap 


montón, el 


punchline 


broche de oro, el 


pillow 


almohada, la 


punish, to 


castigar 


pine tree 


pino, el 


purpose {n) 


propósito, el 


pipe (musical) 


pipa, la 


push, to 


empujar 


pipe for smoking 


pipa de fumar, la 






pity 


lástima, la 






place 


lugar, sitio, el 


V 




plantation 


plantación, la 






play, to 


tocar 


quaver, quake, to 


temblar 


playful 


juguetón, el 


quiet 


quieto 


plead, to 


suphcar 






pleasant 


simpático 






pleasure, with 


placer, con 






plumage 


plumaje, el 






plump 


rechoncho, gordo 







147 



R 

race, to 

radiant 

radiate, to 

rage, to 

rainforest 

ranch 

rapt 

raucous 
reach, to 
reality 
realize, to 
reason 
reassure, to 
recall, to 
recognize, to 
recommend, to 
refuse, to 
regain, to 
regard, to 
regiment 
regretfully 
relaxed, to relax 
relent, to 
reüef 

remind, to 

reminiscent 

renowned 

reply, in 

resentment 

resist, to 

respect, to 

resplendent 

resume, to 

return, to 

revenge 

reverie 

rifle 

road 

roar, howl, to roar 

robe 

rock 

rocking chair 
rocky 
roll up, ti 
roll, to 



correr de prisa 

resplandeciente 

radiar 

hacer furor 

selva tropical, la 

hacienda, la 

extátivo 

ronco 

alcanzar 

realidad, la 

darse cuenta 

razón, la 

asegurar 

recordar 

reconocer 

recomendar 

negar, rehusar 

recobrar 

considerar 

ejército, el 

lamentable 

relajado, relajar 

aplacarse 

alivio, el 

recordar 

tener recuerdos 

renombrado 

responder 

resentimiento, el 

resistir 

respetar 

resplandeciente 

recomenzar 

regresar, volver 

venganza, la 

ensueño, el 

rifle, el 

camino, el, 

bramido, el, bramar 

manto, abrigo, el 

roca, la, piedra, la 

sillón de hamaca 

pedregoso 

arrollarse 

rodar 



roof 
root 
rol, to 
nile, lo 
ruthless 
rylhm 

S 

sack, knapsack 
sacrifice 
sadness, sad 
sailboat 
sample, to 
satisfied, to be 
satisfy, to 
savage 
save, to 

say goodbye, to 

scale, to 

scold, to 

scream, to 

scrumptious 

sculp, to 

scurry, to 

search, to, to seek 

season 

secret 

security 

seed 

seethe, to 
sell, to 
sense, to 
sensuous 
serenade 
scrjjent, snake 
servant 
settle, to 
shade/ shadow 
shake, to 
share, to 
sharp 
shattered 
sheltered 
shield, to 
shine, to 
shiver n 



tejado, el 
raíz, la 
pudnr 
gobernar 
cruel 
ritmo, el 



mochila, la 

sacrificio, el 

tristeza, la, triste 

barco de vela, el 

probar 

contentarse 

satisfacer 

selvage 

salvar 

despedirse 

subir 

regañar 

gritar 

dehcioso 

esculpir 

echar a correr 

buscar 

temporada, la 
secreto, el 
seguridad, la 
semilla, la 
hervir 
despachar 
sentir, sospechar 
sensual 
serenata, la 
serpiente, la 
criado, el 
fijar 

sombra, la 

agitarse 

compartir 

afilado, agudo 

agitado 

{jrotegido 

defender 

lucir 

escalofrío, el 



148 



shiver, to 


estremecerse 


spreading 


extendido 


shock 


sobresalto, el 


spring 


primavera, la 


shoot out, to 


destrozar 


spur n 


espuela, la 


shop, to 


ir de comprar 


spy, to spy 


espía, el, espiar 


shoulder 


hombro, el 


square 


cuadrado, el 


shrewdly 


astuto, listo 


squeak, to 


chillar 


shriek, to 


chillar 


stagger, to 


tambalear 


shrill 


chillón/a 


stammer, to 


balbucear 


shrub 


mata, la 


stare, to 


clavar la vista 


sigh, to 


susprirar 


starve to death, to 


morir de hambre 


sight 


vista, la 


stature 


estatura, la 


sign 


señal, el 


step n 


paso, el 


signal, to 


señalar 


step on, to 


pisar 


silent 


callado 


stock, to 


acumular 


silver spur 


espuela de plata, la 


stop, to, stopped 


parar(se), parado 


sink, to 


dejarse caer 


store 


almacén, el, tienda 


sister 


hermana, la 


store 


tienda, la 


site 


sitio, lugar, el 


storm 


tempestad, la 


skill 


destreza, la 


strange, strangely 


raro, extraño 


skirmish 


escaramuza, la 


stream 


arroyo, el 


slender, skinny 


esbelto, delgado 


streetcat, bum 


vagabundo, el 


slight 


escaso 


strength 


fuerza, la 


smash, to 


romp)er con fuerza 


strike, to 


golpear 


smell, to 


oler 


string n 


hilo, el 


smile (n) smile, to 


risa, la, sonreír 


string bean 


ejote, el 


smoke, to 


fumar 


stroke, blow 


golpe, el 


smooth, to 


aUandar 


stroll, to 


pasear 


snow 


nieve, la 


strong 


fuerte 


soar, to 


subir muy alto 


strut, to 


pavonearse 


sob 


sollozo, el 


stubborn 


obstinado 


soften, to 


ablandarse 


smff, to 


rellenar 


solely 


solamente 


stuffy 


sofocante 


sohd 


sóhdo 


stupid, foolish 


bobo 


son-in-law 


yerno, el 


stupxDr 


estupwr, el 


soul 


alma, la 


style, to 


hacer en estilo 


sound, to 


sonar 


subject 


asunto, el 


soundly 


profundamente 


suddenly, sudden 


de rep)ente, súbito 


space 


espacio, el 


suffer, to 


sufrir 


sparkle 


destello, el 


suffering 


sufrimiento, el 


sparkling 


centelleante 


suitor 


pretendiente, el 


spell 71 


encanto, hechizo 


sunny 


asoleado 


spend, to 


gastar 


superstition 


superstición, la 


spader 


araña, la 


suppliant 


suplicante 


spin, to 


girar 


supposed, it is 


se supwne 


spiny 


espinoso/a 


surname 


apellido, el 


splotch(es) 


mancha(s) 


surround, to 


rodear 


spoil, to 


mimar (niño) 


survive, to 


sobrevivir 


spffead, to 


extender 


swallow n 


golondrina, la 



149 



swamp 
sweet 
swift 
swipe n 
swollen 



T 

take advantage of 
take care of, to 
lake out, to 
take shape, to 
tale 

talk at length, to 
talon 
task, job 
tasty 

teach, to (taught) 

tear M 

tear out, to 

tenderness 

tense 

terrain 

terrified 

terrifying 

tethered 

thick, bulky 

thicket 

thin 

thirst 

thought (n) 
thoughtlessly 
thread/s 
threaten, to 
thrill, to 
throne 
thunder 
tie, to 

time stood still 

tiny bit 

tiptoe 

tired 

toad 

toe 

top, on 
tortilla factory 
touch, to touch 



marisma, la 
dulce 
rápido 
golpe, el 
hinchado 



aventajarse 

cuidar 

sacar 

desarrollarse 
cuento, el 
hablar sin para 
garra, la 
tarea, la 
sabroso 

enseñar, enseñó 
lágrima, la 
arrancar 
ternura, la 
tenso, tieso 
terreno, el 
aterrorizado 
esfKintoso 
atado 

grueso, espeso 
maleza, la 
delgado 
sed, la 

pensamiento, el 
descuidado 
hilo/s, el, los 
amenazar 
emocionarse 
trono, el 
trueno, el 
amarrar, amarrado 
se paró el tiempo 
poquito,pequeño 
puntilla, la 
cansado, fatigado 
sapo, el 
dedo del jne, el 
encaramado 
tortillería, la 
toque, el, tocar 



train, to 
training 
trap, trick 
travel, to 
treasure, to 
treat, to 
tree 

tremble, to 
trudge, to 
trunk (tree) 
trust, to 
truth 
tune, to 
turn around, to 
turn into . . ., to 
turned backwards 
twist, to, twisted 



U 

ugly 

unbearable 

unconscious 

understand, to 

unforgettable 

uniform (n) 

unwilling 

urgency 

V 

vain, in 

valley 

value, to 

velvet 

vibrate, to 

vibration 

view n 

village 

villager 

vine 

viper 

visible 

vision 

vivacious 

voice 



entrenar 

entrenamiento, el 
trampa, la 
viajar 

atesorar, tesorar 
cuidar, tratar 
árbol, el 
estremecer 
caminar 
tronco, el 
confiar 
verdad, la 
afinar 
voltearse 
convertirse 
volteado 

retorcer, retorcido 



feo 

inaguantable 

inconciente 

entender 

inolvidable 

uniforme, el 

maldispuesto 

urgencia, la 



en vano 
valle, el 
valer 

terciopelo, el 
vibrar 
vibración 
vista, la 

pueblo, el, aldea Ja 
aldeano(a) 
enredadera, la 
víbora, la 
visible 
af)arencia, la 
vivaz 
voz, la 



w 



waist, belt 


cinturón, el 


wool 


lana, la 


wake up, to 


despertar 


wordlessly 


sin palabras 


walk, long (n) 


caminata, la 


worker 


labrador, el 


walk, to 


caminar 


worid 


mundo, el 


wall 


pared, la 


worr) , to 


preocuparse 


waltz 


vals, el 


wound 


herida, la 


wander, to 


eirar 


wrap, to 


en\ ol\ er 


wardrobe 


guardarropas, el 


\\ riggle, to 


ondular 


warm 


caluroso 


wrong 


malo, erróneo 


vvamn*' 


hacer guerra 






warrior 


guerrero, el 






wasp 


avispa, la 


Y 




waste 


pérdida, la 






watch over, to 


vigilar 


yearn, to 


anhelar por 


watch, to 


mirar 


yell, to 


gritar 


water, drinking 


agua potable, el 


\esterda\ 


aver 


wave (n) , to 


ola, la, ondear 


)oung, youth 


joven, joven. 


weak 


débü 


) oimg man 


mozo, el 


wealthy 


rico 






wear, to 


llevar 






weary 


cansado 






weathered 


desgastado 






wedding 


boda, la 






weeds 


mala hierba, la 






weight 


f)eso, el 






well-hidden 


bien escondido 






what it's like 


como es, está 






whirlwind 


torbellino, el 






whisper, sigh, to 


suspirar 






whistle to 


silbar 






wife 


esposa, la 






wis ele to 


menear 






will n 


voluntad, la 






wind n 


viento, el 






window sill 


repisa de ventana 






wings 


alas, las 






winter 


invierno, el 






wise 


sabio 






wistful 


pensativo 






witchcraft 


hechicería, la 






wolf 


lobo, el 






wondrous 


maravilloso 






wood 


madera, la 






woodcutter 


leñador, el 






woods 


monte, el 







Other Texts by Patti Lozano 
Published by Dolo Publications, Inc. 



Music that teaches Spanish! 
¡Música que enseña español! 

More music that teaches Spanish! 
¡Más música que enseña español! 



Audio-cassettes and Activity Masters 
to accompany Leyendas con Canciones 
may be purchased separately 



For additional information contact: 



Dolo Publications, Inc 
12800 Briar Forest Drive #23 
Houston, Texas 77077-2201 
(281) 493-4552 or (281) 463-6694 
fax: (281) 679-9092 
e-mail dolo@wt.net 




PATTI LOZANO 

In south Texas, a young soldier dances with a beautiful and mysterious lady who afterwards 
vanishes without a trace... in 8th century Spain, a gypsy's odd advice saves the life of a brave 
Moorish prince... in the tropical rainforests of Brazil, two poor woodcutters meet very dif- 
ferent fates through the powers of "El Caipora'"... in Guatemala, "El Sombrerón," a man so 
tiny, he fits in the palm of a hand, brings tragedy and despair to all who hear his enchanting 
music... 

These captivating and ageless legends, plus many more are retold within the pages of this 
book. The stories come from various Spanish-speaking countries, from the southwestern 
United States, to Mexico, South America and Spain. No matter from which country the 
legend originates, readers will identify with the universal themes of love and hate, poverty and 
wealth, war and peace, and trickery versus naivety. 

Each legend is told first in Spanish and then in English. All stories are followed by original 
songs, including lyrics and musical notation. The songs, which often reflect the musical styles 
of the legends' origins, can be enjoyed on the accompanying audio-cassette. 



Writer, composer and teacher of music and 
Spanish, Patti Lozano has published a variety 
of Spanish song books and other educational 
materials. In "Leyendas con Canciones" she 
draws on her travels to Spanish-speaking 
countries and her experiences with the many 
rhythms and styles of popular and traditional 
music. Her stories and songs will be cherished 
by aspiring learners of Spanish, as well as 
lovers of Hispanic cultures and traditions. 




Dolo Pablicatíons, Inc. 

Language Through Music 



ISBN 0-9650980-2-8